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Pentium 4 pinout

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October 31, 2001 6:21:41 AM

Hi. Is there a place I can find a description of the Pentium 4's 423/478 pinout? I <b>did</b> search but all I could come up with are the pinouts of 486 and my beloved 8088 (40 pins!).
So is there a specific place where I can find this. It's for my school, my <i>very bright</i> prof. doesn't know what an Athlon is so my report shouldn't be too complicated.
Thanks.

More about : pentium pinout

October 31, 2001 6:56:28 AM

get the P4 datasheet on this link
<font color=blue>ftp://download.intel.com/design/Pentium4/datashts/24919...;/font color=blue>

the P3 datasheet here
<font color=blue>ftp://download.intel.com/design/PentiumIII/datashts/245...;/font color=blue>

the Athlon datasheet here
<A HREF="http://www.amd.com/us-en/assets/content-type/white_pape..." target="_new">http://www.amd.com/us-en/assets/content-type/white_pape...;/A>

and AthlonMP datasheet (that describes the thermal diode) here
<A HREF="http://www.amd.com/us-en/assets/content-type/white_pape..." target="_new">http://www.amd.com/us-en/assets/content-type/white_pape...;/A>

scroll down to the last sections that describe the pinout and functions of each pin.

hope this helps.

girish

<font color=red>No system is fool-proof. Fools are Ingenious!</font color=red>
October 31, 2001 7:10:12 AM

sorry i couldnt make links for intel manuals, THG reslly screws up the ftp link by putting a <font color=blue>http://</font color=blue> infront of it! copy the link and paste in your download manager.

best of luck!

gary

<font color=red>No system is fool-proof. Fools are Ingenious!</font color=red>
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November 1, 2001 7:05:44 PM

Thanks girish. I'll slap that page on my report and get it over with.
I just wonder why most of the pins are power/other.
November 2, 2001 4:05:20 AM

these new CPUs need a lot of power, and that too at very low voltage. that means, going by the P=VxI equation, higher power at lower voltage means larger current. A 423 pin P4 2GHz draws as much as 42A of current, consuming 65W at 1.7V!

This 65W value is actually ~30% short of the actual, as some reports say. Intel delibrately published this lower value to 1. show that P4 is kinda green chip (low power consumption) and 2. with the inbuilt thermal management they were pretty sure lower grade heat sinks designed with underspecified values wont hurt the chips. Maybe true, maybe false.

girish

<font color=red>No system is fool-proof. Fools are Ingenious!</font color=red>
!