Compatible Nvidia video card for Dell Dimension XPS t600r

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

I need to upgrade my video card (1280x1024 in 32-Bit Color, NVIDIA GeForce
256 AGP). I was told that my computer could handle a 64 mb card (NVIDIA
Ultra Geforce 64 MB card). The good folks at Dell want to sell me one for
$385 (!) when I know and have seen same cards going for $20 - $40 at
eBay...
right now I am thinking that the Nvidia Geforce 3 Ti500 would do the
trick, but would like to get other opinions suggestions etc.
I don't use my computer for high end gaming, but mostly Avi's and
photoshop, so i don't need anything over the top high end, just solid
performance...
these are my systems specs...

Dell Dimension XPS T600r
Pentium III 600 chip
128 mb memory
NVIDIA GeForce 256 32 mb card
Thanks in advance...
D.
7 answers Last reply
More about compatible nvidia video card dell dimension t600r
  1. Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

    "gramskii" <diodecoder2@(Email Protected)> wrote in message
    news:5ea00b33d6eba5667786b2d82aea48e2@localhost.talkaboutcomputing.com...
    >I need to upgrade my video card (1280x1024 in 32-Bit Color, NVIDIA GeForce
    > 256 AGP). I was told that my computer could handle a 64 mb card (NVIDIA
    > Ultra Geforce 64 MB card). The good folks at Dell want to sell me one for
    > $385 (!) when I know and have seen same cards going for $20 - $40 at
    > eBay...
    > right now I am thinking that the Nvidia Geforce 3 Ti500 would do the
    > trick, but would like to get other opinions suggestions etc.
    > I don't use my computer for high end gaming, but mostly Avi's and
    > photoshop, so i don't need anything over the top high end, just solid
    > performance...
    > these are my systems specs...
    >
    > Dell Dimension XPS T600r
    > Pentium III 600 chip
    > 128 mb memory
    > NVIDIA GeForce 256 32 mb card
    > Thanks in advance...
    > D.
    >


    As a general statement, you appear to be sorely lacking in system memory for
    either gaming (mild to moderate) or I suspect Photoshop as well.

    A GeF3 Ti 200 or Ti500 would work fine in your machine and could be picked
    up (ebay or a local vendor) rather inexpensively. Bumping your system up to
    384 or even 512mb of RAM will cost a bit more. ( www.crucial.com )

    I've got an XPS T 500 w/512mb RAM, 64mb GeF3 video card, running WinXP Home.
    It does okay until you perform an identical operation in a P4 system. Since
    I don't do a lot of graphics or photo work on that machine, I can't really
    say, but my guess is that it would tax it a bit.

    I'm guessing that you will be looking at $100 to $200 if you upgraded both
    the card and RAM (perhaps more depending on buying new or used, and how much
    RAM you purchased).

    Good luck. The XPS T is a solid machine, but it's the old "dollars spent
    versus return" thing again....

    Stew
  2. Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

    Thanks for the tip on the Memory... I am planning to get alot more in the
    near future... I know that I could just get a new computer easily enough,
    but like you said I like the solid performance of my t600r, and the real
    problem with it is the video card fan burning out, not anything on the
    system...I'm waiting til Longhorn comes out before I upgrade this computer
    to something more juicier...
  3. Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

    "gramskii" <diodecoder2@(Email Protected)> wrote in message
    news:5ea00b33d6eba5667786b2d82aea48e2@localhost.talkaboutcomputing.com...
    >I need to upgrade my video card (1280x1024 in 32-Bit Color, NVIDIA GeForce
    > 256 AGP). I was told that my computer could handle a 64 mb card (NVIDIA
    > Ultra Geforce 64 MB card). The good folks at Dell want to sell me one for
    > $385 (!) when I know and have seen same cards going for $20 - $40 at
    > eBay...
    > right now I am thinking that the Nvidia Geforce 3 Ti500 would do the
    > trick, but would like to get other opinions suggestions etc.
    > I don't use my computer for high end gaming, but mostly Avi's and
    > photoshop, so i don't need anything over the top high end, just solid
    > performance...
    > these are my systems specs...
    >
    > Dell Dimension XPS T600r
    > Pentium III 600 chip
    > 128 mb memory
    > NVIDIA GeForce 256 32 mb card

    I've used both a GeForce3 Ti200 and a GeForce4 Ti4200 in an XPS R system
    (similar to your XPS T) and they worked fine. Why do you need a new video
    card? Unless it's for games or some other 3d application, you probably
    won't see any benefit.
  4. Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

    right thanks for the info... actually cuz my available card is on the
    fritz... lots of horizontal lines around script etc... (I think its an
    issue with the fan...). I want to get a new card before it burns out for
    good).
  5. Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

    "gramskii" <diodecoder2@(Email Protected)> wrote in message
    news:9c6329da22d179e5e5044337d484e342@localhost.talkaboutcomputing.com...
    > right thanks for the info... actually cuz my available card is on the
    > fritz... lots of horizontal lines around script etc... (I think its an
    > issue with the fan...). I want to get a new card before it burns out for
    > good).

    Ah, makes sense. Good luck with your upgrade!
  6. Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

    Cards with nVidia chips seem to burn out more often than other brands.

    nVidia chips have always run hot. nVidia sells chips and a reference design for
    manufacturing to a wide range of Pacific Rim manufacturers. Some manufacturers
    choose cooling and ventilation (heat sink and/or cooling fan) that proves to be
    inadequate over the long haul. Some manufacturers simply produce cheap junk.
    (Same can be said for cards with newer ATI chips, built by other so-called name
    brands. ATI does maintain direct quality control over CARDS sold under its own
    brand name. I'm not sure if there are actually nVidia brand CARDS.)

    A cooling fan cramped into the small space between board slots cannot be
    engineered to provide the highest reliability. Worse yet, a system not
    maintained regularly with regular cleaning out of accumulated dust and dirt ends
    up with dirt clogging the cooling fans. It does not take much dirt to stop a
    small cooling fan from spinning, so the fan stops, heat builds up, resulting in
    damage to the chip. Either the card simply stops working or it displays
    unwanted artifacts on screen rather than a clear and accurate image.

    Bottom line: nVidia graphics chip or other, clean the dust and dirt out of the
    cooling fans on graphics cards. Do so every six months or so. Using a can of
    compressed air may have detractors, but it really does work well for this sort
    of task. Any system that comes thru here gets blasted with compressed air.

    .... Ben Myers

    On Thu, 30 Sep 2004 01:01:06 -0400, "gramskii" <diodecoder2@(Email Protected)>
    wrote:

    >right thanks for the info... actually cuz my available card is on the
    >fritz... lots of horizontal lines around script etc... (I think its an
    >issue with the fan...). I want to get a new card before it burns out for
    >good).
    >
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