Getting lost in the forest

Archived from groups: rec.games.frp.dnd (More info?)

Any sugegstions for a table of "things that happen to the party when
they get lost in very dense forest"?

In a mod Im writing the party need to make wilderness survival roles
each day to avoid something interesting/nasty happening to them.

I don't want it to be "Encounter a Bug bear", I was thinking more along
the lines of

- Stumble into a concealed patch of swampy ground
- come across a dificult to cross stream
etc

suggestions?
61 answers Last reply
More about getting lost forest
  1. Archived from groups: rec.games.frp.dnd (More info?)

    "Murf" <rob_murfin@hotmail.com> wrote in message
    news:1115899262.729618.79380@g44g2000cwa.googlegroups.com...
    > Any sugegstions for a table of "things that happen to the party when
    > they get lost in very dense forest"?
    >
    > In a mod Im writing the party need to make wilderness survival roles
    > each day to avoid something interesting/nasty happening to them.
    >
    > I don't want it to be "Encounter a Bug bear", I was thinking more
    > along
    > the lines of
    >
    > - Stumble into a concealed patch of swampy ground
    > - come across a dificult to cross stream
    > etc
    >
    > suggestions?

    Party comes upon a small clearing in the forest. An ivy covered statue
    (bits and pieces or complete)
    sits in the middle of the clearing. What this statue's purpose is,
    well that is up to you.

    Some suggestions:
    1) The statue is just a statue. Perhaps it was taken from a local art
    exhibit, or was lost in transportation
    from one place or another. Maybe the statue has been there for a long
    time and the original creators
    of it are long gone. The statue might be the only record of what an
    ancient and lost race might look like.

    2)The statue is an Oracle. By paying proper respect to the deity the
    statue represents players can ask it
    one minor question for each tribute. The Answers are yes and no only.
    The god could be good, evil,
    or neutral. Maybe it isn't a god at all but an elemental force,
    Djinni, or Outsider. The creature might be
    trying to help or tempt players based upon its motivations.

    3)Stoned Adventurer: The statue is the remains of some person, or
    creature that fell prey to one of the
    many creatures in DnD that turn people to stone. If the players could
    somehow manage to return
    him/her/it they might find a friend in battle, a new arch-enemy, or a
    destructive force that they
    shouldn't have screwed with in the first place.

    4)Construct: The statue is either a non-functioning or functioning
    construct. If it still works, it could
    be pretending until a certain set of instructed actions take place.


    Fungus Farmers: The party finds the woods around them getting thicker
    and gnarly, the trees begin
    to push into the path (if there is one) or the players are forced to
    move in and out of the trees sometimes
    climb checks are needed to get over obstacles. Eventually and probably
    in the middle of the night
    the players begin to see dim lights near the ground of the forest. The
    lights are created by
    a certain Fungus that gathers as much available sunlight as it can
    during the day and converts it to
    the light they see at night. There is nothing more to the fungus
    except that crafty players might find
    some way to use it as a makeshift torch, since all it requires is some
    access to daylight for x amount
    of time for y amount of glow.

    Maybe a certain creature enjoys feasting on this fungus and will do
    just about anything to get more of it. The players might be able to
    bait this creature out into the open
    using the fungus. The creature would probably be an animal, or magical
    beast and maybe something
    that is a singular experience in this forest.

    Sudden small hills: The players travel through dense forest, that
    suddenly drops off about 25-30 feet
    straight down. If traveling quickly most would have to make a reflex
    save, balance check, or any skill
    you deem necessary. What causes the sudden drop, well that could be
    explained or not, that's up to you.

    Wounded animals: Although the players never find the actual animals,
    there are many signs in the woods
    that scream wounded animals. Blood, bits of fur, broken arrows, tree
    branches broken at odd angles.

    Flash flood or suddenly deep river crossing: The players are traveling
    during the worse time of a rainstorm.
    Since they are mostly shielded by the trees they continue to move
    along. They come across a streambed
    allow survival checks to see the signs of a possible flash flood. If
    not a stream they find a river, one that is
    shallow at both edges but gets very deep in the middle. This makes it
    much harder for small characters to
    cross unless they have a decent swim check, or a med or larger
    character to help them across.

    Dead Woods: Players should see signs of less animals, and frequent
    dead plants as they get closer to this
    section of the forest. The air around them cools down, and they find
    it hard to catch their breath if they
    are pushing themselves too much. The Dead Woods is a small section of
    forest devoid of light and filled
    with negative energy. This effect leaves players feeling cold and
    hollow. Only long term exposure to this
    area results in any serious damage. Healing magic might also be a
    little less effective here. The number
    of undead they find in this area might increase. Not unusual undead,
    but animal based skeletons, lost
    adventurers, etc.

    Those are some ideas. I'm sure I could come up with more, just don't
    have the time right now.

    DA
  2. Archived from groups: rec.games.frp.dnd (More info?)

    Murf wrote:
    > Any sugegstions for a table of "things that happen to the party when
    > they get lost in very dense forest"?

    They find a path. It may lead them out of the forest,
    or it may be just a game trail.

    A forest clearing, with enough of a view of distant
    hills to give the characters a little help in
    navigation - getting lost in a deep forest is
    very easy to do.

    A long-abandoned peddler's cart, with no sign
    of the peddler or his horse. The few tools and
    knick-knacks left behind are in poor condition
    but would do in a pinch for weaponsmith or
    armorsmith rolls, but these tools are not
    very portable. The covered cart would make
    a nice place to spend the night for a few
    adventurers.

    An area where dozens of large trees have recently
    been broken and uprooted. A ranger or other
    woodlands-savvy character may be able to identify
    the large creature(s) that rampaged here and
    thankfully moved on.

    A small basket half-full of nuts, apparently
    not here for long. No indication of who
    left it here.

    A graveyard, consisting of less than a score
    of grave markers weathered to the point of
    illegibility. Nothing remains of the community
    that buried their dead here. If anyone tries
    to dig up the graves, each one will be long
    empty.

    Walt Smith
    Firelock on DALNet
  3. Archived from groups: rec.games.frp.dnd (More info?)

    On Thu, 12 May 2005 12:01:02 GMT, Murf scrawled:

    > I don't want it to be "Encounter a Bug bear", I was thinking more along
    > the lines of
    >
    > - Stumble into a concealed patch of swampy ground
    > - come across a dificult to cross stream
    > etc
    >
    > suggestions?
    >

    Traps set by hunters for animals and forgotten about

    Concealed dangerous terrain (caves, unstable ground etc.)

    Poisonous insects/plants

    Dense foliage that may need to be cleared (covers brambles etc. but can be
    passed through by Druids?)

    Severe weather posing a threat in certain parts - woodlands on a hill may
    attract lightning, very tall trees could pose problems in high winds
    (falling branches/trees)

    --
    http://www.rexx.co.uk

    To email me, visit the site.
  4. Archived from groups: rec.games.frp.dnd (More info?)

    Some of these could be hooks or seeds for an adventure.
    Some are just flavor.

    The remains of a small campfire in a clearing. Have no
    traces of what or who created the fire. Could be good
    guys, could be orcs. Who knows? The fire is still
    burning. Where did they go?

    An abandoned cabin, stocked with supplies.

    A grove of hundreds of apple trees. The apples are all
    different shapes and sizes and colors, and most of them
    taste horrible.

    What is obviously a battle site. Broken arrows, spears,
    helmets, a few decaying skeletons, orc and elven.

    A putrid, decaying animal carcass. It is obvious that
    this animal died of disease. Lots of flies and maggots.

    A cursed ranger, who has been turned into an animal that
    would normally not be found in this forest (like a lion).
    He attempts to communicate with the party, but it all
    comes out like roars, snarls and growls.

    Mysterious, star shaped figures hanging from the trees.
    (Blair Witch Style).

    Rare plants with excellent medicinal value. Or, maybe
    poison!

    A dead monster. Make it something that would have been
    way to powerful for the party to handle. It is full of
    arrows and crossbow bolts, and there is evidence of magic
    having been used (circular burn patterns from fireballs).
    Maybe there is even an inscription on a tree or stone
    nearby, naming the victors (PC's could run into them
    later in another town). One of the ears is missing (
    a halfing in the party is collecting monster ears).

    A lizard man hunting party. They don't want to fight,
    and don't want any trouble. Unless the PC's get nasty.

    A group of moss covered skeletons standing in a circle
    around a tree. At the foot of the tree is the remains
    of the adventurer that they chased into the forest.
    The last order given to the skeletons was to kill that
    adventurer, so they have just stood here for years
    afterwards. It takes a few rounds before they begin
    to move.

    A hunting camp, where 3 hunters have a wagon stacked
    full of pelts ready to return to civilization.

    A man's shirt. Nothing more, nothing less.

    A band of first level adventurers (if your group is
    higher level). These guys have no food or water,
    and one of them is badly injured (arrow wounds).
    Two of them appear to be carrying a 3 foot high
    golden and diamond encrusted statue (an alignment
    test for good PCs). They won't say what happened
    to them or where they got the statue.
  5. Archived from groups: rec.games.frp.dnd (More info?)

    Speaking of Blair Witch:

    Have the party pass a landmark. Something unique.

    Later on, they pass it again, even though they think they
    haven't changed direction. Instant Classic!
  6. Archived from groups: rec.games.frp.dnd (More info?)

    Murf wrote:
    > Any sugegstions for a table of "things that happen to the party when
    > they get lost in very dense forest"?

    O.k. 102 Instant Adventures...

    01 party comes across a long abandoned, overgrown, and unused road.
    02 stone cairns
    03 megalithic stone circle
    04 tree-cave
    05 monster or animal burrow
    06 natural bridge (tree trunk, beaver dam, etc.) across watercourse
    07 Great Tree Roots
    08 tree branches fall from high canopy in a storm
    09 Rain, Snow, or other inclement weather
    10 Swamp
    11 Unexplained lights at night
    12 bright eyes at night from the forest
    13 strange animal/monster sounds (howls, calls, bellows, and screams)
    14 Crickets, toads, or locusts
    15 high bridge across watercourse
    16 watercut natural bridge over watercourse
    17 forgotten ruins of a temple or town
    18 Roadsign
    19 Marker
    20 Blaze or other tree marks denoting overland trail or path
    21 Dead-End box canyon with steep overhangs
    22 Tree of death
    23 Tree of life
    24 fruit trees
    25 insect plague
    26 bats or spiders
    27 enchanted stream or pond
    28 mushrooms
    29 natural herbs
    30 unusual flowers
    31 man-made forest or grove
    32 druids grove
    33 grove/shelter
    34 abdandoned cabin or hut
    35 wild herd animals
    36 wild predator
    37 unusual reptile
    38 mounds
    39 burial mound
    40 abandoned earthworks
    41 long stone wall
    42 stone wall mostly rubble circles clearing
    43 rice paddy
    44 salty marshland
    45 cypress swamp with waterways
    46 tall grass parks
    47 meadows
    48 bogs
    49 wild herd stampede
    50 skeleton chained to a tree
    52 hot spring
    53 clear spring
    54 tropical hammock
    55 tropical plants or forest
    56 pine or other evergreen forest
    57 unusual natural rock formations
    58 abandoned or lost mine
    59 covered well
    60 Geyser or hot spring
    61 mammoths, bison, other prehistoric animals
    62 earthwork complex
    63 tunnel complex
    64 fossils
    65 fossilized remains of monsters
    66 petrified people, monsters, and animals
    67 man-made gardens
    68 cenote (Deep wide limestone hole that goes below water table)
    69 earthquake faultline
    70 flaming geyser
    71 bubble geyser
    72 waterfalls
    73 series of lakes and waterfalls
    74 dryads grove
    75 large quantities of birds, waterfowl, or flying insects
    76 natural mineral formations
    77 gems, pretty stones, or gemstone mine
    78 ancient battleground
    79 scenic trail
    80 barbarian ruins
    81 abandoned encampment
    82 natural shrine
    83 ceremonial clearing
    84 abandoned stronghold
    85 encloaed pasture or corral
    86 seashore or lakeside (large lake)
    87 caves and caverns
    88 lake with islands
    89 canal
    90 flash flood
    91 heavy rains with flooded waterways
    92 boat landing
    93 Inn or Tavern
    94 Elven or other native villaage
    95 reptiles
    96 Lightning strike & forest fire
    97 enormous forest fire
    98 recently abandoned camp ground
    99 animal trail
    100 animal or monster tracks
    101 church, temple, or monastery
    102 Ice storm

    With Regards,
    Dirk
  7. Archived from groups: rec.games.frp.dnd (More info?)

    On 12 May 2005 05:01:02 -0700, "Murf" <rob_murfin@hotmail.com> wrote:

    >Any sugegstions for a table of "things that happen to the party when
    >they get lost in very dense forest"?
    >
    >In a mod Im writing the party need to make wilderness survival roles
    >each day to avoid something interesting/nasty happening to them.
    >
    >I don't want it to be "Encounter a Bug bear", I was thinking more along
    >the lines of
    >
    >- Stumble into a concealed patch of swampy ground
    >- come across a dificult to cross stream
    >etc
    >
    >suggestions?
    >


    Unable to find dry wood because it rained, you spend a damp cold
    night.
    Find poisonous berries/mushrooms and mistake them for edible.
    Drink from contaminated water. Too bad you didn't know to boil it.
    Animals try to eat your provisions in the night.
    A rotted out tree falls and makes the sound of a character screaming
    because it fell on his leg.
    Your campfire gets out of control. You must scramble to put it out.
    You find moss growing on the south side of a tree. Now you're even
    more lost.
    Encounter with irritant plant life or bugs leaves someone scratching
    for days
    A character steps carelessly and twists an ankle.
    Animal or thorn scratches become infected. A character develops a
    fever.
    You urinate on a stately oak. Bad move.

    There are also a wide variety of carnivorous or otherwise dangerous
    plants that could be avoided with a survival roll, as well as animals
    like bears and rattlesnakes that are only dangerous if you are stupid
    around them.
  8. Archived from groups: rec.games.frp.dnd (More info?)

    You sound like an awesome DM. Wish I had a chance to play in one of
    your campaigns. So descriptive and creative. Great job man! Tell you
    the truth I'd love to see more threads like this, where its just a long
    string of little adventure IDEAS.... or tiny encounters of interest to
    throw in anywhere. Anyway, again, great ideas.
  9. Archived from groups: rec.games.frp.dnd (More info?)

    Murf wrote:
    > Any sugegstions for a table of "things that happen to the party when
    > they get lost in very dense forest"?
    >
    > In a mod Im writing the party need to make wilderness survival roles
    > each day to avoid something interesting/nasty happening to them.
    >
    > I don't want it to be "Encounter a Bug bear", I was thinking more
    along
    > the lines of
    >
    > - Stumble into a concealed patch of swampy ground
    > - come across a dificult to cross stream
    > etc
    >
    > suggestions?

    1. Stumble into the concealed arms of a sto-roper bard. Fnarr!

    2. Come across a difficult to cross stream of gas-spore paladins,
    their plumed helms glinting in the noonday sun.

    Uh, that's all I got. Do you have a 2-sided die?

    ~ Aby
  10. Archived from groups: rec.games.frp.dnd (More info?)

    "webhed" <jreyst@gmail.com> wrote in message
    news:1116002311.468902.309140@g44g2000cwa.googlegroups.com...
    > You sound like an awesome DM. Wish I had a chance to play in one of
    > your campaigns. So descriptive and creative. Great job man! Tell you
    > the truth I'd love to see more threads like this, where its just a
    > long
    > string of little adventure IDEAS.... or tiny encounters of interest
    > to
    > throw in anywhere. Anyway, again, great ideas.

    I'd like to think this one was about me, but I doubt it. :)

    Calling Ego Police, gigantic ego on the loose taking AOO against
    anybody that comes near.
  11. Archived from groups: rec.games.frp.dnd (More info?)

    Murf wrote:
    >
    > Any sugegstions for a table of "things that happen to the party when
    > they get lost in very dense forest"?
    >
    > In a mod Im writing the party need to make wilderness survival roles
    > each day to avoid something interesting/nasty happening to them.
    >
    > I don't want it to be "Encounter a Bug bear", I was thinking more
    > along the lines of
    >
    > - Stumble into a concealed patch of swampy ground
    > - come across a dificult to cross stream

    Here's a list of dangerous terrain features and events I've compiled
    over the years which (AFAIK) no one else has mentioned yet:

    avalanche
    bridge, sabotaged (an old commando trick)
    bridge, washed out
    cave-in
    earthquake
    eel-infested waters
    fumarole
    mud flat
    mud pots
    quagmire
    quicksand
    rope bridge (It seems safe enough...)
    sinkhole
    slide (land-, mud-, rock-)
    tar pit
    tidal bore (river)
    volcanic eruption (lava flows/bombs, ash, smoke)

    And in the spirit of other posters who provided "interesting" ideas:
    many years ago I found "The Chaos Project", a website devoted to the
    Runequest RPG. One section was called "Found Items", with 342 unusual
    discoveries to puzzle and perplex your players.

    http://www.maranci.net/cparchfi.htm


    Arivne
  12. Archived from groups: rec.games.frp.dnd (More info?)

    >
    >>Any sugegstions for a table of "things that happen to the party when
    >>they get lost in very dense forest"?
    >>
    >>In a mod Im writing the party need to make wilderness survival roles
    >>each day to avoid something interesting/nasty happening to them.

    Since it's only a DC15 survival roll to avoid a natural hazard/getting
    lost (maybe with the standard -2 if it's a very dense forest) is it
    worth the effort? Most parties I've seen can manage that on a take 10.

    Andy
  13. Archived from groups: rec.games.frp.dnd (More info?)

    "Decaying Atheist" <harker@coxdot.net> wrote in message
    news:Uz9he.26830$Um.18444@lakeread08...
    >
    > "webhed" <jreyst@gmail.com> wrote in message
    > news:1116002311.468902.309140@g44g2000cwa.googlegroups.com...
    >> You sound like an awesome DM. Wish I had a chance to play in one of
    >> your campaigns. So descriptive and creative. Great job man! Tell you
    >> the truth I'd love to see more threads like this, where its just a long
    >> string of little adventure IDEAS.... or tiny encounters of interest to
    >> throw in anywhere. Anyway, again, great ideas.
    >
    > I'd like to think this one was about me, but I doubt it. :)

    I would guess that it was. Those were solid, quality ideas.

    --
    ^v^v^Malachias Invictus^v^v^

    It matters not how strait the gate,
    How charged with punishment the scroll,
    I am the Master of my fate:
    I am the Captain of my soul.

    from _Invictus_, by William Ernest Henley
  14. Archived from groups: rec.games.frp.dnd (More info?)

    On Sat, 14 May 2005 12:02:27 +0100, Andy Luker <"andyluker AT
    dsl.pipex.com"> wrote:

    >
    >>
    >>>Any sugegstions for a table of "things that happen to the party when
    >>>they get lost in very dense forest"?
    >>>
    >>>In a mod Im writing the party need to make wilderness survival roles
    >>>each day to avoid something interesting/nasty happening to them.
    >
    >Since it's only a DC15 survival roll to avoid a natural hazard/getting
    >lost (maybe with the standard -2 if it's a very dense forest) is it
    >worth the effort? Most parties I've seen can manage that on a take 10.

    That's a good point. Fundamentally taking a walk in the woods, even
    dense woods just isn't all that dangerous, as long you ignore the
    possibility of monster attacks and know the basics of survival.
  15. Archived from groups: rec.games.frp.dnd (More info?)

    "David Johnston" <rgorman@telusplanet.net> wrote in message
    news:42869699.48582057@news.telusplanet.net...
    > On Sat, 14 May 2005 12:02:27 +0100, Andy Luker <"andyluker AT
    > dsl.pipex.com"> wrote:
    >
    >>
    >>>
    >>>>Any sugegstions for a table of "things that happen to the party when
    >>>>they get lost in very dense forest"?
    >>>>
    >>>>In a mod Im writing the party need to make wilderness survival roles
    >>>>each day to avoid something interesting/nasty happening to them.
    >>
    >>Since it's only a DC15 survival roll to avoid a natural hazard/getting
    >>lost (maybe with the standard -2 if it's a very dense forest) is it
    >>worth the effort? Most parties I've seen can manage that on a take 10.
    >
    > That's a good point. Fundamentally taking a walk in the woods, even
    > dense woods just isn't all that dangerous, as long you ignore the
    > possibility of monster attacks and know the basics of survival.
    >
    Agreed, forests, even very dense forests are just not inherently dangerous.
    Is it your intension to make this an abnormally dangerous forest? If it is
    then Fill it with elves, Orcs, Goblins, etc defending their territory. This
    means traps; ambushes; terrain alterations via illusion to lead them out of
    forest; seporation of party members; scare tactics; charmed or otherwise
    controlled animals attacking; immobilazation via pits, mud or vines; charmed
    party members told they should leave; constantly under watchful eyes and so
    on.

    Rooks
  16. Archived from groups: rec.games.frp.dnd (More info?)

    "Malachias Invictus" <capt_malachias@hotmail.com> wrote in message
    news:YJCdnbomoPv4eBvfRVn-hw@comcast.com...
    >
    > "Decaying Atheist" <harker@coxdot.net> wrote in message
    > news:Uz9he.26830$Um.18444@lakeread08...
    >>
    >> "webhed" <jreyst@gmail.com> wrote in message
    >> news:1116002311.468902.309140@g44g2000cwa.googlegroups.com...
    >>> You sound like an awesome DM. Wish I had a chance to play in one
    >>> of
    >>> your campaigns. So descriptive and creative. Great job man! Tell
    >>> you
    >>> the truth I'd love to see more threads like this, where its just a
    >>> long
    >>> string of little adventure IDEAS.... or tiny encounters of
    >>> interest to
    >>> throw in anywhere. Anyway, again, great ideas.
    >>
    >> I'd like to think this one was about me, but I doubt it. :)
    >
    > I would guess that it was. Those were solid, quality ideas.

    Well thank you. I have an overly active imagination at times. I put
    that to decent
    use in my games and creative writing. If only I could get my
    punctuation under
    control. Sigh, I used to be so good at High School english.
  17. Archived from groups: rec.games.frp.dnd (More info?)

    Andy Luker wrote:

    > Since it's only a DC15 survival roll to avoid a natural hazard/getting
    > lost (maybe with the standard -2 if it's a very dense forest) is it
    > worth the effort? Most parties I've seen can manage that on a take 10.

    Oh, yeah. o.k. So uhh... there are no circumstancial modifiers for
    getting lost?

    What about heavy rain (tropical forest) / snow (mountains) /
    sandstorm (desert)? According to my copy of Sandstorm, a duststorm
    provides a -2 penalty to visibility making the DC of a survival
    roll effectively 17.

    I would routinely add the following modifiers to that base DC 15
    survival check for players in forest settings based on the
    following circumstances:

    Condition base DC Modifier
    ==========================================
    Heavy Trees and Overgrowth +5
    Dense Trees & Undergrowth +10
    Patches of Impenetrable Forest +12-15
    Crude Map -3
    Detailed Map -5
    Mist +2
    Light Fog +5
    Heavy Fog +10
    Light Rain/Snow +2
    Rain Snow +4
    Heavy Rain / Snow +6
    Storm +8
    Severe Storm +10
    Tornado or Hurricane Strike +15
    Light Smoke (From forest fire) +4
    Heavy Smoke (From forest fire) +8
    Light Marshes & Swamp +4
    Heavy Marsh / Large Swamps +8
    Frequent Lakes forcing course
    changes or alterations +3
    High Lake Density forcing course
    changes or alterations +6
    Party Being Followed / Tracked +2
    (Party aware of tracking efforts)
    Enchanted or Hallowed Forest +5
    Party Familiar With Area +0
    Party Intimately Familiar With
    Area -5
    Party Exploring New Area +5
    Compass +4
    Map +1-+10
    (Depends on quality of map)
    Watercourse -5


    Re,
    Dirk
  18. Archived from groups: rec.games.frp.dnd (More info?)

    Dirk Collins wrote:
    > Andy Luker wrote:
    >
    >> Since it's only a DC15 survival roll to avoid a natural hazard/getting
    >> lost (maybe with the standard -2 if it's a very dense forest) is it
    >> worth the effort? Most parties I've seen can manage that on a take 10.
    >
    >
    > Oh, yeah. o.k. So uhh... there are no circumstancial modifiers for
    > getting lost?
    >

    By the RAW no, except for the generic +/-2 circumstances modifier.

    > What about heavy rain (tropical forest) / snow (mountains) / sandstorm
    > (desert)? According to my copy of Sandstorm, a duststorm provides a -2
    > penalty to visibility making the DC of a survival roll effectively 17.
    >
    > I would routinely add the following modifiers to that base DC 15
    > survival check for players in forest settings based on the following
    > circumstances:
    >
    > Condition base DC Modifier
    > ==========================================
    > Heavy Trees and Overgrowth +5
    > Dense Trees & Undergrowth +10
    > Patches of Impenetrable Forest +12-15
    > Crude Map -3
    > Detailed Map -5
    > Mist +2
    > Light Fog +5
    > Heavy Fog +10
    > Light Rain/Snow +2
    > Rain Snow +4
    > Heavy Rain / Snow +6
    > Storm +8
    > Severe Storm +10
    > Tornado or Hurricane Strike +15
    > Light Smoke (From forest fire) +4
    > Heavy Smoke (From forest fire) +8

    A lot of modifiers to remember, most of which boil down to "you can't
    see far enough to see any landmarks" so just stiff them with the -4 spot
    penalties from the DMG weather section and the slowed/impossible
    movement rate & risk of hyperthermia.

    A lot of these penalties seem very high (to me) considering the sort of
    skill penalities listed in the PHB, rarely more than

    > Light Marshes & Swamp +4
    > Heavy Marsh / Large Swamps +8
    > Frequent Lakes forcing course
    > changes or alterations +3
    > High Lake Density forcing course
    > changes or alterations +6

    I'd see these more as slowing down your rate of advance rather
    thanmaking you more likely to get lost, after all a lake is a bit of a
    big obvious landmark.

    > Party Being Followed / Tracked +2
    > (Party aware of tracking efforts)

    Just shows them down as per the tracking feat

    > Enchanted or Hallowed Forest +5

    Could be either a plus or minus depending on by who & why it's enchanted

    > Party Familiar With Area +0
    > Party Intimately Familiar With
    > Area -5
    > Party Exploring New Area +5
    I'd use Synergy bonus for Knowledge(Local) or (Geography, thus no need
    to decide if the PCs know the area or not,

    > Compass +4
    > Map +1-+10
    > (Depends on quality of map)

    I'd simplify it by going for "Masterwork Navigation instruments" for a
    +2 to skill (Do compasses exist in D&D?)
    > Watercourse -5
    >
  19. Archived from groups: rec.games.frp.dnd (More info?)

    "David Johnston" <rgorman@telusplanet.net> wrote in message
    news:4283bce2.279598118@news.telusplanet.net...
    > On 12 May 2005 05:01:02 -0700, "Murf" <rob_murfin@hotmail.com> wrote:
    >
    > >Any sugegstions for a table of "things that happen to the party when
    > >they get lost in very dense forest"?

    [snip]

    > Unable to find dry wood because it rained, you spend a damp cold
    > night.
    > Find poisonous berries/mushrooms and mistake them for edible.
    > Drink from contaminated water. Too bad you didn't know to boil it.
    > Your campfire gets out of control. You must scramble to put it out.
    > You find moss growing on the south side of a tree. Now you're even
    > more lost.
    > Encounter with irritant plant life or bugs leaves someone scratching
    > for days
    > A character steps carelessly and twists an ankle.
    > Animal or thorn scratches become infected. A character develops a
    > fever.

    Unless he means a party of stupid, stoned teenagers these things shouldn't
    be an issue for professional adventurers. Even 1st level ones.
  20. Archived from groups: rec.games.frp.dnd (More info?)

    "Dirk Collins" <dirk.collins@Earthlink.Net> wrote in message
    news:FaJhe.3672$w21.2527@newsread3.news.atl.earthlink.net...
    > Andy Luker wrote:
    >
    > > Since it's only a DC15 survival roll to avoid a natural hazard/getting
    > > lost (maybe with the standard -2 if it's a very dense forest) is it
    > > worth the effort? Most parties I've seen can manage that on a take 10.
    >
    > Oh, yeah. o.k. So uhh... there are no circumstancial modifiers for
    > getting lost?
    >
    > What about heavy rain (tropical forest) / snow (mountains) /
    > sandstorm (desert)? According to my copy of Sandstorm, a duststorm
    > provides a -2 penalty to visibility making the DC of a survival
    > roll effectively 17.
    >
    > I would routinely add the following modifiers to that base DC 15
    > survival check for players in forest settings based on the
    > following circumstances:
    >
    > Condition base DC Modifier
    > ==========================================
    > Heavy Trees and Overgrowth +5
    > Dense Trees & Undergrowth +10
    > Patches of Impenetrable Forest +12-15

    Lay of the crack pipe Dirk. An effective DC 30 check to avoid getting
    lost? You realize the level of difficulty that is supposed to represent
    don't you?
  21. Archived from groups: rec.games.frp.dnd (More info?)

    Symbol wrote:
    > "Dirk Collins" wrote:
    >
    >>Andy Luker wrote:
    >>
    >>
    >>>Since it's only a DC15 survival roll to avoid a natural hazard/getting
    >>>lost (maybe with the standard -2 if it's a very dense forest) is it
    >>>worth the effort? Most parties I've seen can manage that on a take 10.
    >>
    >>Oh, yeah. o.k. So uhh... there are no circumstancial modifiers for
    >>getting lost?
    >>
    >>What about heavy rain (tropical forest) / snow (mountains) /
    >>sandstorm (desert)? According to my copy of Sandstorm, a duststorm
    >>provides a -2 penalty to visibility making the DC of a survival
    >>roll effectively 17.
    >>
    >>I would routinely add the following modifiers to that base DC 15
    >>survival check for players in forest settings based on the
    >>following circumstances:
    >>
    >>Condition base DC Modifier
    >>==========================================
    >>Heavy Trees and Overgrowth +5
    >>Dense Trees & Undergrowth +10
    >>Patches of Impenetrable Forest +12-15
    >
    >
    > Lay of the crack pipe Dirk. An effective DC 30 check to avoid getting
    > lost? You realize the level of difficulty that is supposed to represent
    > don't you?

    First... Don't insult people, unless you can first spell
    correctly, and also write correctly. It detracts from your
    credibility, and you thusly lose the effect you intend when
    everyone realizes just what a retard you really are in being
    either too lazy, or too stupid to do even try to do something right.

    Second, and I was going to address this second point with Andy as
    well... The generic +-2 circumstance modifier for DC's is
    insufficent in regards to properly creating a challenging
    adventure when it comes to exploration of wilderland areas.

    Having any character with an outdoor skill focus such as Survival,
    Wilderness lore, Knowledge(Geography), Knowledge(Local), or a
    similar skill will render the additional trivial penalties imposed
    by the DMG for circumstances useless. Now Frostburn and Sandstorm
    have upped the ante a bit in creating a more challenging
    environment, in that they have provided additional bonuses and
    penalties for travel through rugged terrain or difficult weather
    conditions, however those modifiers are far from inclusive, and
    represent a feeble stab at adding some really excellent
    opportunities for roleplaying and creative gameplay.

    Foremost, no party in the wilderness should be without experienced
    guides or scouts. If they are, and are in a wilderness area, they
    should find it remarkably easy to get lost, or otherwise
    disoriented while traveling.

    In addition... IRL in real wilderness (You know... the places
    without roads, people to ask for directions from, and friendly
    convenience stores with maps), it is easy for even experienced
    adventurers to get lost. Every year, even veteran hikers and
    mountain climbers die, get lost, and/or require the aid of a
    search and rescue team on account they get disoriented while
    traveling due to terrain and/or weather conditions. While It's a
    bit harder for experienced hikers to actually get lost these days
    on account of GPS receivers and the availability of excellent
    quality maps, it still happens with an amazing frequency. But then
    again, you didn't know that, or were not aware of that until now,
    living in the open desert, Kansas, Nebraska, or your well marked
    suburb, or town and all.

    The problem with lakes is not that it is an obvious landmark, it's
    like when you get too many lakes, and they are all obvious
    landmarks. Easy to get confused as to which lake (landmark) you
    are actually navigating at the moment. To understand what I'm
    talking about, you would have to take an extended visit to, or
    live in the wilderness areas of Idaho, Wyoming, Montana (Colorado
    doesn't really count anymore...), Minnesota, Canada, Michigan,
    Louisiana, Arkansas, Mississippi, Northern California, Utah, New
    Mexico, Florida, or Alaska... to name a few.

    The synergy bonus for area familiarity, is likewise inadequate.
    When you consider that a 5th level character can have 8 ranks in
    survival, and will often have a +1 or better stat bonus, it means
    the DC 15 survival check for getting lost can be beat 80% of the
    time, or better (With any knowledge synergy bonus). This is a
    flip-flop on what actually happens (even with experienced
    wilderland travelers). Usually, without a map, and/or navigational
    aids the seasoned wilderland traveler will actually only arrive at
    his/her intended destination about 20% of the time on the first
    attempt.

    Bad weather will force a party to slow down, and I'm ok with the
    additional sandstorm/frostburn rules for that, but the party will
    also slow down due to terrain as well, and calculating just how
    much they are slowed down, depends of course, on the direction (or
    many different directions), they travel, or the direction the
    terrain forces them to travel, on any given day. Using my mods,
    you can calculate that with a bit more detail, to provide more
    adhoc, and/or spontaneous opportunities for roleplaying instead of
    rollplaying.

    The +2 DC penalty for being tracked that I've provided, doesn't
    mean the party automagically slows down (so they can be easily
    caught by their pursuers), it is provided on account they are
    distracted from navigating correctly... on account, they are
    focused on the folks following them. The party won't slow down,
    especially if they are being followed, but it's easier for them to
    miss subtle clues that will allow them to easily reach their
    intended destination.

    Yes, D&D has a compass. It's part of the Navigator's Kit available
    in Arms & Equipment Guide, and provides a +2 bonus for Intuit
    Direction, Survival, or WIlderness Lore checks (While at sea), and
    on Profession(Cartographer) checks to make maps. Nothing on
    navigating overland with a compass however...

    Andy Wrote:
    "A lot of modifiers to remember, most of which boil down to "you
    can't see far enough to see any landmarks" so just stiff them with
    the -4 spot penalties from the DMG weather section and the
    slowed/impossible movement rate & risk of hyperthermia."

    I'd think that being able to see only 10'-40' in a heavy fog would
    preclude seeing far enough to spot any landmarks at all unless
    they happen to stumble right onto the landmark itself. -4 seems
    inadequate when viewed in this light.

    I keep my list handy, especially when the party travels into
    uncharted territory. Slows them down some, but then again,
    traveling outside of commonly known routes tends to do that, even
    for veterans, and other experienced wilderland adventurers. That's
    why it's called trailblazing.

    Finally on DC:

    DC 5 - Easy, anyone should be able to do this
    DC 10 - An Average challenge, Anyone can do this with enough time
    DC 15 - Tough
    DC 20 - Challenging
    DC 25 - Formidable
    Dc 30 - Heroic
    DC 35 - Superheroic
    DC 40+ - Nearly Impossible - Only the most highly trained veteran
    would even have a remote chance of succeeding

    What an adventurer with Max Skill Ranks, a +2 Circumstance Bonus,
    and a +1 Stat Mod Bonus taking 10 can beat, Without the help of
    other party members, No roll being required...

    1st Level DC 17
    5th Level DC 22
    10th Level DC 27
    15th Level DC 32
    20th Level DC 37

    A DC 30 obstacle, isn't so challenging as it would at first seem
    to be...

    Re,
    Dirk
  22. Archived from groups: rec.games.frp.dnd (More info?)

    Chapter DC30 "It was never this hard, even in "the Lost World"

    Grengoraas the Stone Roper bard mournfully waved his tentacles.
    "Mnnaarrrrrrrrr" he wailed. They were lost again. It had seemed like
    such an easy journey, down the track, past the mill and on to the
    "Jolly Owlbear" (the best pub for twenty miles)

    However, he recalled, Donnablas the Gas Spore ranger had _promised_
    he had his map and compass with him. Was it so difficult? Why had they
    got lost walking for only half an hour?

    PS
    My take on this
    The chars (4th to 5th level) need to travel for 3 days thru very dense
    forest. They have a ranger (a gnome, who also owns a pig he believes is
    a polymorphed llammsu, called Prince Valiant (the pig, not the gnome
    ranger)).

    Anyway, I want them to stumble off route perhaps twice during this bit
    of the adventure. I have a couple of amusing side encounters. We play
    3.0ed The gnome has a wilderness lore of +7. Hence I will say its a
    DC15 to keep on track, check 3 times a day... for play balance.

    To get back on track requires an intuit direct of DC 15, with bonuses
    for climbing trees etc.

    Thanks for all the suggestios for side encounters by the way, very
    helpful.
  23. Archived from groups: rec.games.frp.dnd (More info?)

    Im going to take a flyer on the rules and say that it in this instance,
    the gnome is not in a woodland type he is familiar with - and that the
    DC15 roll represents say 4 hours of traveling and keeping all the other
    PCs on the right route.
  24. Archived from groups: rec.games.frp.dnd (More info?)

    In article <1116336539.802067.306980@g43g2000cwa.googlegroups.com>,
    "Murf" <rob_murfin@hotmail.com> wrote:

    > Anyway, I want them to stumble off route perhaps twice during this bit
    > of the adventure. I have a couple of amusing side encounters. We play
    > 3.0ed The gnome has a wilderness lore of +7. Hence I will say its a
    > DC15 to keep on track, check 3 times a day... for play balance.

    The gnome can take 10.

    Kevin Lowe,
    Tasmania.

    --
    Kevin Lowe,
    Tasmania.
  25. Archived from groups: rec.games.frp.dnd (More info?)

    Murf wrote:

    >
    > Anyway, I want them to stumble off route perhaps twice during this bit
    > of the adventure. I have a couple of amusing side encounters.

    Why do they have to get lost to have the amusing side encounters? Just
    have them happen on the route and avoid screwing over the PCs who have
    bothered to spend points on Wilderness Lore.

    Andy
  26. Archived from groups: rec.games.frp.dnd (More info?)

    Andy wrote -

    > Why do they have to get lost to have the amusing side encounters?
    Just
    have them happen on the route and avoid screwing over the PCs who have
    bothered to spend points on Wilderness Lore.

    You are missing my entire point. If the PCs, say get lost once then
    take steps to avoiding getting lost again, they will not have the extra
    encounters. I don't want the trip to the main adventure site to be
    railroaded into "day one, this happens". I dont mind if some of my
    "side trek" encounters are not used - they can always be recycled in
    other mods. If however they end up faffing about a bit, they will have
    more encs.

    My DM style is to really wing it around a basic core I have written out
    in advance. Also, we never tend to do dungeon exploring adventures.
    Also, to address your "dont penalise PCs who pick wilderness lore
    skills", I tend to write in bits were it is helpful to use as many
    skills as possible in a meaningful way. This, needs a bit of
    flexibility in how you interpret how a skill could be used.

    Otherwise, PC's *do* think there is little point in picking skills
    other than concentration and heal.

    Also (sorry for ranting) I like to give PCs new skills - like "Military
    Leadership" if (as in the case of my campaign recently) one of them
    role-plays rallying the town guards particularly well during a siege.
  27. Archived from groups: rec.games.frp.dnd (More info?)

    Symbol wrote:

    > The 5th level Ranger survival expert cannot take 10 and succeed at any
    > point of the journey.

    I wasn't writing you about this, in any way, shape, or form. You
    had already disqualified yourself from the ongoing discussion in
    this thread, on account of your advanced level of retardedness.
  28. Archived from groups: rec.games.frp.dnd (More info?)

    Symbol wrote:

    > "Kevin Lowe" <me@private.net> wrote in message
    >>"Don't tell the ranger, but we're being followed. You know he'll just
    >>get +2 DC to his rolls if he knows".
    >
    >
    > .... and I thought it was too stupid for words. Apparently not.

    Only for a metagaming master such as yourself.
  29. Archived from groups: rec.games.frp.dnd (More info?)

    In article <1116342709.715599.218660@g49g2000cwa.googlegroups.com>,
    "Murf" <rob_murfin@hotmail.com> wrote:

    > Im going to take a flyer on the rules and say that it in this instance,
    > the gnome is not in a woodland type he is familiar with - and that the
    > DC15 roll represents say 4 hours of traveling and keeping all the other
    > PCs on the right route.

    The gnome can still Take 10.

    Kevin Lowe,
    Tasmania.

    --
    Kevin Lowe,
    Tasmania.
  30. Archived from groups: rec.games.frp.dnd (More info?)

    In article <GXwie.6507$w21.5605@newsread3.news.atl.earthlink.net>,
    Dirk Collins <dirk.collins@Earthlink.Net> wrote:

    > Symbol wrote:
    >
    > > "Kevin Lowe" <me@private.net> wrote in message
    > >>"Don't tell the ranger, but we're being followed. You know he'll just
    > >>get +2 DC to his rolls if he knows".
    > >
    > >
    > > .... and I thought it was too stupid for words. Apparently not.
    >
    > Only for a metagaming master such as yourself.

    It looks like you are confused about what metagaming is.

    Example of metagaming: "I charge the enemy, because I know that the DM
    would not put an encounter we can't handle this early in the adventure".

    Example of non-metagaming: "I shoot at the enemy that is not in cover,
    because I get a penalty to hit enemies that are in cover".

    In a world where you get a significant performance hit if you tell the
    ranger you are being followed, you don't tell the ranger you are being
    followed.

    I hope that has helped you understand what metagaming is.

    Kevin Lowe,
    Tasmania.

    --
    Kevin Lowe,
    Tasmania.
  31. Archived from groups: rec.games.frp.dnd (More info?)

    "Kevin Lowe" <me@private.net> wrote in message
    news:me-D7D748.19245018052005@news01.comindico.com.au...

    > Kevin Lowe,
    > Tasmania.
    >
    > --
    > Kevin Lowe,
    > Tasmania.

    I think you need to sort your sig out!
  32. Archived from groups: rec.games.frp.dnd (More info?)

    "Dirk Collins" <dirk.collins@Earthlink.Net> wrote in message
    news:CDwie.6491$w21.1266@newsread3.news.atl.earthlink.net...
    > Symbol wrote:
    >
    > > The 5th level Ranger survival expert cannot take 10 and succeed at any
    > > point of the journey.
    >
    > I wasn't writing you about this, in any way, shape, or form. You
    > had already disqualified yourself from the ongoing discussion in
    > this thread, on account of your advanced level of retardedness.

    This is too funny. The man who posted a spelling and grammar flame while
    making spelling and grammar errors. The man who is such a moron he thinks
    "retardedness" is actually a word. The man who thinks it is reasonable for
    a mid or high level Ranger to get lost within an hour of hitting the
    Wilderness.

    Your snip and run is duly noted, coward, and your position has been
    utterly devestated.
  33. Archived from groups: rec.games.frp.dnd (More info?)

    Kevin Lowe <me@private.net> writes:

    > In article <ykfie.2861$M36.529@newsread1.news.atl.earthlink.net>,
    > Dirk Collins <dirk.collins@Earthlink.Net> wrote:
    >
    >> Symbol wrote:
    >
    >> > Lay of the crack pipe Dirk. An effective DC 30 check to avoid getting
    >> > lost? You realize the level of difficulty that is supposed to represent
    >> > don't you?
    >>
    >> First... Don't insult people, unless you can first spell
    >> correctly, and also write correctly. It detracts from your
    >> credibility, and you thusly lose the effect you intend when
    >> everyone realizes just what a retard you really are in being
    >> either too lazy, or too stupid to do even try to do something right.
    >
    > Thusly?
    >
    >> Second, and I was going to address this second point with Andy as
    >> well... The generic +-2 circumstance modifier for DC's is
    >> insufficent in regards to properly creating a challenging
    >> adventure when it comes to exploration of wilderland areas.
    >
    > Barring really extreme environments and inadequate equipment, clueful
    > people do not have that much trouble. +/-2 is insufficient to make
    > routine Survival rolls challenging for DnD PCs, and that is just too bad
    > for DMs who want to run scenarios where the "heroes" starve in the
    > wilderness.
    >
    There is also another part of what makes Wilderness challenging:
    Travel speed.

    I just ran a party through rugged mountains. When your travel speed is
    a mere 6 miles per day, it becomes rather hard to move out of Orc
    territory after your first Orc contact, to name just an example.

    There is no need to aggravate the risks of getting lost, if even a
    party that knows where it is going is constantly at risk of being
    attacked by monsters (and these 'monsters' may even be normal
    animals). Let alone other Wilderness hazards.

    Mart

    --
    "We will need a longer wall when the revolution comes."
    --- AJS, quoting an uncertain source.
  34. Archived from groups: rec.games.frp.dnd (More info?)

    "Mart van de Wege" <mvdwege.usenet@wanadoo.nl> wrote in message
    news:871x84953a.fsf@angua.ankh-morpork.lan...
    > Kevin Lowe <me@private.net> writes:

    > > Barring really extreme environments and inadequate equipment, clueful
    > > people do not have that much trouble. +/-2 is insufficient to make
    > > routine Survival rolls challenging for DnD PCs, and that is just too
    bad
    > > for DMs who want to run scenarios where the "heroes" starve in the
    > > wilderness.
    > >
    > There is also another part of what makes Wilderness challenging:
    > Travel speed.
    >
    > I just ran a party through rugged mountains. When your travel speed is
    > a mere 6 miles per day, it becomes rather hard to move out of Orc
    > territory after your first Orc contact, to name just an example.
    >
    > There is no need to aggravate the risks of getting lost, if even a
    > party that knows where it is going is constantly at risk of being
    > attacked by monsters (and these 'monsters' may even be normal
    > animals). Let alone other Wilderness hazards.

    As I noted earlier there is a slight oddity produced by increasing your
    travel pace given that checks are made on a time rather than distance
    increment. If the characters were hustling through Orc territory then they
    would actually have less chance of becoming lost. That aside, I agree.
  35. Archived from groups: rec.games.frp.dnd (More info?)

    On Wed, 18 May 2005 01:12:02 GMT, Dirk Collins
    <dirk.collins@Earthlink.Net> carved upon a tablet of ether:

    > Symbol wrote:
    >
    > > The 5th level Ranger survival expert cannot take 10 and succeed at any
    > > point of the journey.
    >
    > I wasn't writing you about this, in any way, shape, or form. You
    > had already disqualified yourself from the ongoing discussion in
    > this thread, on account of your advanced level of retardedness.

    Coming from you, especially considering the number of errors in your
    spelling and grammar flame, this is the equivalent of you sticking
    your fingers in your ears and shouting "CAN'T HEAR YOU!"

    Are you so perfect that even your mistakes are a form of perfection?


    --
    Rupert Boleyn <rboleyn@paradise.net.nz>
    "Just because the truth will set you free doesn't mean the truth itself
    should be free."
  36. Archived from groups: rec.games.frp.dnd (More info?)

    Rupert Boleyn wrote:

    > On Wed, 18 May 2005 01:12:02 GMT, Dirk Collins carved upon a tablet of ether:
    >>Symbol wrote:
    >>>The 5th level Ranger survival expert cannot take 10 and succeed at any
    >>>point of the journey.
    >>
    >>I wasn't writing you about this, in any way, shape, or form. You
    >>had already disqualified yourself from the ongoing discussion in
    >>this thread, on account of your advanced level of retardedness.
    >
    >
    > Coming from you, especially considering the number of errors in your
    > spelling and grammar flame, this is the equivalent of you sticking
    > your fingers in your ears and shouting "CAN'T HEAR YOU!"
    >
    > Are you so perfect that even your mistakes are a form of perfection?

    Ehhh? Not at all. I'm just not keen on folks crashing my party,
    especially when they have insufficent knowledge too, and when they
    just want to hurl insults, and other dung in my general direction
    out of some twisted sense of simian spite.

    Ahh. Then again, maybe it is the reptile portion of their brain
    that is engaged when they are reading this newsgroup. Must be,
    with their innate sense of which DC mods to apply, for an
    off-trail hike.

    Re,
    Dirk
  37. Archived from groups: rec.games.frp.dnd (More info?)

    Rupert Boleyn wrote:

    > Are you so perfect that even your mistakes are a form of perfection?
    >

    The sad part is... I got some of the more common DC mods out of
    the weather and environment tables in Sandstorm and Frostburn.

    Re,
    Dirk
  38. Archived from groups: rec.games.frp.dnd (More info?)

    "Rupert Boleyn" <rboleyn@paradise.net.nz> wrote in message
    news:f16l81hbhn8f8vs64uv8dvlihutfapg7jq@4ax.com...
    > On Wed, 18 May 2005 01:12:02 GMT, Dirk Collins
    > <dirk.collins@Earthlink.Net> carved upon a tablet of ether:
    >
    > > Symbol wrote:
    > >
    > > > The 5th level Ranger survival expert cannot take 10 and succeed at
    any
    > > > point of the journey.
    > >
    > > I wasn't writing you about this, in any way, shape, or form. You
    > > had already disqualified yourself from the ongoing discussion in
    > > this thread, on account of your advanced level of retardedness.
    >
    > Coming from you, especially considering the number of errors in your
    > spelling and grammar flame, this is the equivalent of you sticking
    > your fingers in your ears and shouting "CAN'T HEAR YOU!"
    >
    > Are you so perfect that even your mistakes are a form of perfection?

    It's Dirk, he's a hypocrital juice wearing fool who is always wrong but
    never admits it. This behaviour is no more surprising now than it has been
    at any other time. Remember his claim that the Romans killed Archimedes
    because they persecuted intellectuals? Still makes me chuckle that one.
  39. Archived from groups: rec.games.frp.dnd (More info?)

    "Dirk Collins" <dirk.collins@Earthlink.Net> wrote in message
    news:Zdxie.3238$M36.2074@newsread1.news.atl.earthlink.net...
    > Rupert Boleyn wrote:
    >
    > > Are you so perfect that even your mistakes are a form of perfection?
    > >
    >
    > The sad part is... I got some of the more common DC mods out of
    > the weather and environment tables in Sandstorm and Frostburn.

    Don't even bother lying to group and pretend those supplements produce
    similar results to yours.
  40. Archived from groups: rec.games.frp.dnd (More info?)

    On Wed, 18 May 2005 11:36:00 +0100, "Symbol" <jb70@talk21.com> raised
    a finger to the sky and proclaimed:

    >
    >"Dirk Collins" <dirk.collins@Earthlink.Net> wrote in message
    >news:Zdxie.3238$M36.2074@newsread1.news.atl.earthlink.net...
    >> Rupert Boleyn wrote:
    >>
    >> > Are you so perfect that even your mistakes are a form of perfection?
    >> >
    >>
    >> The sad part is... I got some of the more common DC mods out of
    >> the weather and environment tables in Sandstorm and Frostburn.
    >
    >Don't even bother lying to group and pretend those supplements produce
    >similar results to yours.

    Well, I don't own Sandstorm, but p11 of Frostburn does have mods.
    However, Dirk, note that the

    Precipitation (Snow) +2
    Snowstorm +4
    Blizzard +6
    White-out conditions +10

    are *not* cumulative.

    Yes, trying not to get lost on a glacier, in a white-out blizzard,
    should be DC 30. But that's about as hard as it gets.

    --
    Either way, I hate you Count Chocula, if I didn't already.
    - Drifter Bob, rec.games.frp.dnd
  41. Archived from groups: rec.games.frp.dnd (More info?)

    On Wed, 18 May 2005 01:47:05 GMT, Dirk Collins
    <dirk.collins@Earthlink.Net> carved upon a tablet of ether:

    > Ehhh? Not at all. I'm just not keen on folks crashing my party,
    > especially when they have insufficent knowledge too, and when they
    > just want to hurl insults, and other dung in my general direction
    > out of some twisted sense of simian spite.
    >
    > Ahh. Then again, maybe it is the reptile portion of their brain
    > that is engaged when they are reading this newsgroup. Must be,
    > with their innate sense of which DC mods to apply, for an
    > off-trail hike.

    If that was the case you should've said so, rather than flaming their
    spelling and writing, especially when their obvious spelling mistake
    was probably a typo. Your initial argument was that they weren't
    eligible to discuss matters with you, not because they were ignorant,
    but because they couldn't spell correctly.


    --
    Rupert Boleyn <rboleyn@paradise.net.nz>
    "Just because the truth will set you free doesn't mean the truth itself
    should be free."
  42. Archived from groups: rec.games.frp.dnd (More info?)

    David Johnston wrote:
    >> Unable to find dry wood because it rained, you spend a damp cold
    >> night.
    >> Find poisonous berries/mushrooms and mistake them for edible.
    >> Drink from contaminated water. Too bad you didn't know to boil it.
    >> Your campfire gets out of control. You must scramble to put it out.
    >> You find moss growing on the south side of a tree. Now you're even
    >> more lost.
    >> Encounter with irritant plant life or bugs leaves someone scratching
    >> for days
    >> A character steps carelessly and twists an ankle.
    >> Animal or thorn scratches become infected. A character develops a
    >> fever.

    Symbol wrote:
    > Unless he means a party of stupid, stoned teenagers these things
    > shouldn't be an issue for professional adventurers. Even 1st level
    > ones.

    Right. Most of those things are covered by a DC 10 Survival check:

    DC 10: Get along in the wild. Move up to one-half your overland
    speed while hunting and foraging (no food or water supplies needed).
    You can provide food and water for one other person for every 2
    points by which your check result exceeds 10.

    Survival is usable untrained, so finding good food and water should be
    trivial for a typical PC party; just take 10. The group's divine caster
    can pick up the slack if somebody has a Wisdom penalty, and you're set
    if anybody actually has ranks in Survival.

    A couple of the issues are covered by a DC 15 Survival check:

    DC 15: Keep from getting lost or avoid natural hazards, such as
    quicksand.

    Again, this is trivial if anybody actually has ranks in Survival. If
    not, you'll need to take your chances with the dice and may get into
    trouble. This is rarely a problem in practice -- wandering around lost
    just means more XP, after all! -- but if it ever seriously bothers the
    party, somebody will probably drop a few ranks into Survival at the next
    level-up (e.g., this will only ever happen once).
    --
    Bradd W. Szonye
    http://www.szonye.com/bradd
  43. Archived from groups: rec.games.frp.dnd (More info?)

    Firelock wrote:
    >> Party's Druid, Ranger or Barbarian gets put out of commission, many
    >> parties I've seen only have one guy with the Master of the Wild motif
    >> going on. Everyone else maxed out on something other than wilderness
    >> survival - *very* common. Oops.

    Symbol wrote:
    > Now that is when it could get interesting....

    Yeppers. It might be a good idea to keep a few "dumb survival
    encounters" on hand for situations like this. While they probably won't
    seriously inconvenience the PCs, it'll make them appreciate Survival
    Guy. (One problem with playing Survival Guy is that many of your
    abilities are so trivial that you don't get much spotlight time out of
    them. This is a way of indirectly making the survivalist role more
    glamorous.)

    By the way, Clerics with the travel domain also make good Survivalists,
    and rogues are OK too if you don't mind spending a few cross-class
    points (or cherry-picking a ranger level). Travel is one of the more
    popular cleric domains in my campaigns, since our group often lacks a
    high-level arcane caster.
    --
    Bradd W. Szonye
    http://www.szonye.com/bradd
  44. Archived from groups: rec.games.frp.dnd (More info?)

    Murf <rob_murfin@hotmail.com> wrote:
    > If the PCs, say get lost once then take steps to avoiding getting lost
    > again, they will not have the extra encounters. I don't want the trip
    > to the main adventure site to be railroaded into "day one, this
    > happens". I dont mind if some of my "side trek" encounters are not
    > used - they can always be recycled in other mods. If however they end
    > up faffing about a bit, they will have more encs.

    Instead of making it easier for the PCs to get lost (which makes them
    feel incompetent), tempt them with clues that lead off the main trail
    into side encounters (which makes them feel in control). If they're not
    in a rush, or the clue is tasty enough, they'll go for the side
    encounter every time IME.
    --
    Bradd W. Szonye
    http://www.szonye.com/bradd
  45. Archived from groups: rec.games.frp.dnd (More info?)

    Murf wrote:
    > Any sugegstions for a table of "things that happen to the party when
    > they get lost in very dense forest"?
    >
    > In a mod Im writing the party need to make wilderness survival roles
    > each day to avoid something interesting/nasty happening to them.
    >
    > I don't want it to be "Encounter a Bug bear", I was thinking more along
    > the lines of
    >
    > - Stumble into a concealed patch of swampy ground
    > - come across a dificult to cross stream
    > etc
    >
    > suggestions?
    >
    Raccoons eat all their food while they are asleep , and they have to
    forage. If they fail their check, they still gather food but it's not good
    (either they're allergic to it, or it's mildly poisonous/diseased).

    Old forgotten traps, unsprung, from when the king battled his evil
    nephew for control of the throne. These are things like covered
    pits, deadfalls, etc.

    The ground is primarily limestone, and sinkholes may open up without
    warning beneath the party.

    A disease has struck certain species of trees (super-termites?), causing
    them
    to appear sound but are prone to fall over suddenly, imperiling the party as
    the vibration of their footfalls fells the weak ones. Maybe with this
    you could
    use Knowledge (nature) to understand the peril and/or help recognize
    afflicted trees before they fall.

    Awinter storm blows in, blanketing them with snow, ice, or just fog. They
    may get lost and/or have to protect themselves from the cold.

    The fey have fairy rings (mushroom circles) sprout whenever they have one
    of their weird rites. Sometimes wild magic lurks there, and it taints
    mortals
    who pass through them. You can treat that like a trap which bestows a
    minor
    curse if not avoided via a Survival check.
  46. Archived from groups: rec.games.frp.dnd (More info?)

    In article <me-02AAAA.21022717052005@news01.comindico.com.au>,
    Kevin Lowe <me@private.net> wrote:
    >"Don't tell the ranger, but we're being followed. You know he'll just
    >get +2 DC to his rolls if he knows".
    >
    >Heck, give them -2 to every roll they make while someone is following
    >them. It makes as much sense.

    Hmm. Maybe if they're being chased by Chun the Unavoidable...
    --
    "Yo' ideas need to be thinked befo' they are say'd" - Ian Lamb, age 3.5
    http://www.cs.queensu.ca/~dalamb/ qucis->cs to reply (it's a long story...)
  47. Archived from groups: rec.games.frp.dnd (More info?)

    In article <me-84D7DC.19303718052005@news01.comindico.com.au>,
    Kevin Lowe <me@private.net> wrote:
    >
    >Kevin Lowe,
    >Tasmania.
    >
    >--
    >Kevin Lowe,
    >Tasmania.

    Has Tasmania decided to imitate New Zealand and split into North and South
    islands?

    --
    "Yo' ideas need to be thinked befo' they are say'd" - Ian Lamb, age 3.5
    http://www.cs.queensu.ca/~dalamb/ qucis->cs to reply (it's a long story...)
  48. Archived from groups: rec.games.frp.dnd (More info?)

    On Wed, 18 May 2005 11:39:16 +0100, "Symbol" <jb70@talk21.com> carved
    upon a tablet of ether:

    > It's Dirk, he's a hypocrital juice wearing fool who is always wrong but
    > never admits it. This behaviour is no more surprising now than it has been
    > at any other time. Remember his claim that the Romans killed Archimedes
    > because they persecuted intellectuals? Still makes me chuckle that one.

    But they did!!! As proof, I offer you the murder of Archimedes. How
    can you be so dense???


    --
    Rupert Boleyn <rboleyn@paradise.net.nz>
    "Just because the truth will set you free doesn't mean the truth itself
    should be free."
  49. Archived from groups: rec.games.frp.dnd (More info?)

    "Rupert Boleyn" <rboleyn@paradise.net.nz> wrote in message
    news:187m81d1v7adnq6ud2ovqh30bvlftah8bb@4ax.com...
    > On Wed, 18 May 2005 11:39:16 +0100, "Symbol" <jb70@talk21.com> carved
    > upon a tablet of ether:
    >
    > > It's Dirk, he's a hypocrital juice wearing fool who is always wrong
    but
    > > never admits it. This behaviour is no more surprising now than it has
    been
    > > at any other time. Remember his claim that the Romans killed
    Archimedes
    > > because they persecuted intellectuals? Still makes me chuckle that
    one.
    >
    > But they did!!! As proof, I offer you the murder of Archimedes. How
    > can you be so dense???

    Ask Dirk he's the expert!
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