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The rule of 100

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May 26, 2005 3:45:27 PM

Archived from groups: rec.games.frp.dnd (More info?)

I was going to post this in response to the "how much to buy a house"
thread, but I thought I'd do it here instead to be criticized on its own.

I've had this idea in my head for a few years -- that you can roughly
compare modern economics and populations with the "rule of 100". Sometimes
when you see the population of a major DnD city at 23,000 people or the cost
of a house being 500-1000 gp ... it doesn't really register very well unless
you really have a handle on medieval eco/pop and how it relates to the funky
numbers in our beloved DnD books. But to make things easy, I use this rule
of 100.

To get an idea of how important/big a DnD village or city is, multiply the
pop by 100 to get a modern equivalent. So using Greyhawk as an example, the
nation of Perrenland (where I'm currently running a campaign) has 468,000
people -- might be the equivalent of a nation of 47 million (almost double
Canada?). Its capital city of Schwartzenbruin has 27500 people -- about the
size/importance of Toronto (2.something million people). The village my PCs
started in (Grindel) has about 200 souls -- that's similar to a modern small
town of 20,000.

This works in reverse of course. I grew up in small town of Uxbridge,
Ontario (pop. 6500 at the time) -- it's like a teeny hamlet of 65 people.
Never heard of it? Not surprised.

Same with money. 1gp = $100. It's easy if you think of a copper piece as a
dollar.

So that commoner makes 10 bucks a day (much poorer than anyone in Canada
would make now, but we don't have medieval-commoner level poverty for the
most part). That cottage mentioned in the house thread is worth $50 -
100,000.

In reverse: me, I make about 500gp a year, live in a house worth 1400gp (we
owe our local moneychanger 1000gp still ... but who doesn't), a beer costs 3
or 4 copper pieces and I can buy a full set of DnD core books at World's
Away for 1gp.

It's kinda fun if you go comparing prices of what you can buy for your
modern money -- how much does a modern horse cost? a sword? wine? an apple?

Or if you had to go advenuring now and had to buy DnD equipment at $100/gp,
how much savings could you put into it and what would you buy? Who among us
could afford the $230,000 for a magic weapon?

Spinner

More about : rule 100

Anonymous
May 26, 2005 4:23:51 PM

Archived from groups: rec.games.frp.dnd (More info?)

"Spinner" <bprentic@uwo.ca> wrote in news:3fm98oF8ll6oU1@individual.net:


> To get an idea of how important/big a DnD village or city is, multiply
> the pop by 100 to get a modern equivalent. So using Greyhawk as an
> example, the nation of Perrenland (where I'm currently running a
> campaign) has 468,000 people -- might be the equivalent of a nation of
> 47 million (almost double Canada?). Its capital city of
> Schwartzenbruin has 27500 people -- about the size/importance of
> Toronto (2.something million people). The village my PCs started in
> (Grindel) has about 200 souls -- that's similar to a modern small town
> of 20,000.

Canada is up to 31 million people or so now, I believe.
Toronto has 3 million people living there.
So Grindel is about the same size as Ajax?

> This works in reverse of course. I grew up in small town of Uxbridge,
> Ontario (pop. 6500 at the time) -- it's like a teeny hamlet of 65
> people. Never heard of it? Not surprised.

Sure I have, nice little boring rural town.
Anonymous
May 26, 2005 8:00:18 PM

Archived from groups: rec.games.frp.dnd (More info?)

In article <3fm98oF8ll6oU1@individual.net>, Spinner <bprentic@uwo.ca> wrote:
>To get an idea of how important/big a DnD village or city is, multiply the
>pop by 100 to get a modern equivalent. So using Greyhawk as an example, the
>nation of Perrenland (where I'm currently running a campaign) has 468,000
>people -- might be the equivalent of a nation of 47 million (almost double
>Canada?).

32 million, so it has about 50% more people.

> Its capital city of Schwartzenbruin has 27500 people -- about the
>size/importance of Toronto (2.something million people). The village my PCs
>started in (Grindel) has about 200 souls -- that's similar to a modern small
>town of 20,000.
--
"Yo' ideas need to be thinked befo' they are say'd" - Ian Lamb, age 3.5
http://www.cs.queensu.ca/~dalamb/ qucis->cs to reply (it's a long story...)
Related resources
May 26, 2005 8:39:51 PM

Archived from groups: rec.games.frp.dnd (More info?)

On Thu, 26 May 2005 12:23:51 -0500, freakybaby
<Here-I-Am@No-Where.com> wrote:

>"Spinner" <bprentic@uwo.ca> wrote in news:3fm98oF8ll6oU1@individual.net:
>
>
>> To get an idea of how important/big a DnD village or city is, multiply
>> the pop by 100 to get a modern equivalent. So using Greyhawk as an
>> example, the nation of Perrenland (where I'm currently running a
>> campaign) has 468,000 people -- might be the equivalent of a nation of
>> 47 million (almost double Canada?). Its capital city of
>> Schwartzenbruin has 27500 people -- about the size/importance of
>> Toronto (2.something million people). The village my PCs started in
>> (Grindel) has about 200 souls -- that's similar to a modern small town
>> of 20,000.
>
>Canada is up to 31 million people or so now, I believe.
>Toronto has 3 million people living there.

There are really two populations for Toronto - Toronto city, which I
believe is approaching 3 million, and the Greater Toronto Area (GTA)
which is closer to 5 million, but contains lots of little
cities/towns.

>So Grindel is about the same size as Ajax?
>
>> This works in reverse of course. I grew up in small town of Uxbridge,
>> Ontario (pop. 6500 at the time) -- it's like a teeny hamlet of 65
>> people. Never heard of it? Not surprised.
>
>Sure I have, nice little boring rural town.
>
Anonymous
May 27, 2005 12:38:58 PM

Archived from groups: rec.games.frp.dnd (More info?)

This analysis was useful. Thank you for posting.
Anonymous
May 27, 2005 1:15:28 PM

Archived from groups: rec.games.frp.dnd (More info?)

Jordan <jda980@msn.com> wrote in news:iucc91h910ngofo88kf31fcmi7pk5hkop1@
4ax.com:


>>Canada is up to 31 million people or so now, I believe.
>>Toronto has 3 million people living there.
>
> There are really two populations for Toronto - Toronto city, which I
> believe is approaching 3 million, and the Greater Toronto Area (GTA)
> which is closer to 5 million, but contains lots of little
> cities/towns.
Anonymous
May 27, 2005 1:30:14 PM

Archived from groups: rec.games.frp.dnd (More info?)

Jordan <jda980@msn.com> wrote in news:iucc91h910ngofo88kf31fcmi7pk5hkop1@
4ax.com:

>>Canada is up to 31 million people or so now, I believe.
>>Toronto has 3 million people living there.
>
> There are really two populations for Toronto - Toronto city, which I
> believe is approaching 3 million, and the Greater Toronto Area (GTA)
> which is closer to 5 million, but contains lots of little
> cities/towns.

Yup I live in one of those little GTA cities.
May 27, 2005 2:08:10 PM

Archived from groups: rec.games.frp.dnd (More info?)

"Alex Johnson" <compuwiz@psualum.com> wrote in message
news:D 774d2$q4k$2@news01.intel.com...
> This analysis was useful. Thank you for posting.

Thanks for the support -- everyone else is just "correcting" populations and
enjoying the Cdn references!

Spinner
May 27, 2005 2:13:48 PM

Archived from groups: rec.games.frp.dnd (More info?)

>> The village my PCs started in
>> (Grindel) has about 200 souls -- that's similar to a modern small town
>> of 20,000.
>
> So Grindel is about the same size as Ajax?
>
Yes! ... that is, if Ajax was somewhere around North Bay. IOW, Grindel's
too isolated to be "like" Ajax (with its easy access to Toronto and its big
neighbouring cities) ... but yes, the same size. The whole idea of this
scheme is to give you a feel of what a town is "like" in modern terms.

>> This works in reverse of course. I grew up in small town of Uxbridge,
>> Ontario (pop. 6500 at the time) -- it's like a teeny hamlet of 65
>> people. Never heard of it? Not surprised.
>
> Sure I have, nice little boring rural town.
>
HEY! We have a cinema now!

(how much excitement can you expect from a village of 65???)

(that is, if it's not a few miles from ruined moathouse that is the
fountainhead of an evil cult ... and let me say that Uxbridge definitely has
*no* ruined moathouse nearby)

Spinner
Anonymous
May 27, 2005 4:54:18 PM

Archived from groups: rec.games.frp.dnd (More info?)

"Spinner" <bprentic@uwo.ca> wrote in news:3foo8sF8u8icU1@individual.net:

>>> The village my PCs started in
>>> (Grindel) has about 200 souls -- that's similar to a modern small
>>> town of 20,000.
>>
>> So Grindel is about the same size as Ajax?
>>
> Yes! ... that is, if Ajax was somewhere around North Bay. IOW,
> Grindel's too isolated to be "like" Ajax (with its easy access to
> Toronto and its big neighbouring cities) ... but yes, the same size.
> The whole idea of this scheme is to give you a feel of what a town is
> "like" in modern terms.
>
>>> This works in reverse of course. I grew up in small town of
>>> Uxbridge, Ontario (pop. 6500 at the time) -- it's like a teeny
>>> hamlet of 65 people. Never heard of it? Not surprised.
>>
>> Sure I have, nice little boring rural town.
>>
> HEY! We have a cinema now!

Wow, it has been long time, when did the area get that?

> (how much excitement can you expect from a village of 65???)

Hopefully a really decent corn roast.

> (that is, if it's not a few miles from ruined moathouse that is the
> fountainhead of an evil cult ... and let me say that Uxbridge
> definitely has *no* ruined moathouse nearby)

No it does not and a real shame that is, ruined buildings are great to
throw a parties in.
Anonymous
May 27, 2005 6:24:24 PM

Archived from groups: rec.games.frp.dnd (More info?)

I'll second "I like this rule". It is easy, convenient, and gives good
"in the ballpark" results.


MadKaugh
May 27, 2005 7:42:49 PM

Archived from groups: rec.games.frp.dnd (More info?)

>>>> This works in reverse of course. I grew up in small town of
>>>> Uxbridge, Ontario (pop. 6500 at the time) -- it's like a teeny
>>>> hamlet of 65 people. Never heard of it? Not surprised.
>>>
>>> Sure I have, nice little boring rural town.
>>>
>> HEY! We have a cinema now!
>
> Wow, it has been long time, when did the area get that?
>
Mid-90s.

>> (how much excitement can you expect from a village of 65???)
>
> Hopefully a really decent corn roast.
>

Mmmm ... corn.

Spinner
Anonymous
May 28, 2005 4:21:04 AM

Archived from groups: rec.games.frp.dnd (More info?)

Spinner wrote:
>>>(how much excitement can you expect from a village of 65???)
>>
>>Hopefully a really decent corn roast.
>>
>
>
> Mmmm ... corn.

Not only that. The hamlet of Uxbridge, Ontario probably has the
highest percentage of gamers per capita in North America.

Someone should start a convention there.

Re,
Dirk
May 29, 2005 2:37:17 AM

Archived from groups: rec.games.frp.dnd (More info?)

>>>>(how much excitement can you expect from a village of 65???)
>>>
>>>Hopefully a really decent corn roast.
>>>
>>
>>
>> Mmmm ... corn.
>
> Not only that. The hamlet of Uxbridge, Ontario probably has the highest
> percentage of gamers per capita in North America.
>
> Someone should start a convention there.
>
Yes -- I've seen that in the news as well. Something like 17%. That's
staggering any way you look at it.

Spinner
May 29, 2005 2:37:51 AM

Archived from groups: rec.games.frp.dnd (More info?)

> I'll second "I like this rule". It is easy, convenient, and gives good
> "in the ballpark" results.
>
Thanks. No one can say I don't contribute now and then...

Spinner
Anonymous
May 31, 2005 8:39:39 PM

Archived from groups: rec.games.frp.dnd (More info?)

Spinner wrote:
> I was going to post this in response to the "how much to buy a house"
> thread, but I thought I'd do it here instead to be criticized on its own.
>
> I've had this idea in my head for a few years -- that you can roughly
> compare modern economics and populations with the "rule of 100". Sometimes
> when you see the population of a major DnD city at 23,000 people or the cost
> of a house being 500-1000 gp ... it doesn't really register very well unless
> you really have a handle on medieval eco/pop and how it relates to the funky
> numbers in our beloved DnD books. But to make things easy, I use this rule
> of 100.
>

I've done this for a number of years, sometime in 2e time...

- Justisaur
!