thoughts on dragons and a character I'm making

Archived from groups: rec.games.frp.dnd (More info?)

Dragons are like angels and archangels. They are fixed and do not
evolve. They do not have souls. They are not biological creatures,
they are magical manifestations of universal laws in biological forms,
so their ecology is different from natural animals and different from
humans. They are agents of dharma and the wheel of maya and so each
type of dragon represents an aspect of polarity and duality inherant in
the finite. Dragons function as direct components of the universe's
perpetual motion, because in a magical, fantasy universe balance can
easily be upset by mortal interferance. Dragons do not opperate with a
mindset to maintain the universal ballance, there is simply enough
dragons in the world to maintain the ballance, they are not antibodies,
more like the lymphatic system. If ballance ever did get moved out of
place too far no dragon would do anything about it beyond their basic
purpose, although good dragons might give non-dragon heros a heads-up
and might even offer som assistance, evil dragons could care less and
would only act in self-preservation. It is up to mortals to act with
awareness of the place of dragons in the cosmos.

I am making a sor 1 / pal 2 character. One thing about him is his
profession: dragon liaison.

feat: dragon blooded, (gold dragon +1 to all saves) dragon friend (has
dragon allie to call on for aid, information, or hire-- might be connect
to background history as mentor) war wizard (may apply int bonus to
attacks once a round)

The dragon liaisons function as go between's for dragons and non-dragon
communities and society. My character assertains the direction and
purpose of a particular dragon and works for the befit of the dragon and
the local communities. Thus, dragons get what they want and humans and
humanoids benefit.

So, my character's profession skill could be used as a kind of dragon
lore skill when encountering a dragon. He would know about dragon
politics, wars, and treaties, individual dragons of renown (mostly the
old and powerful) and would know dragon etiquette. This information
would help his diplomacy skill, supplying information for roleplaying an
encounter, but not really give any bonuses to a roll-- he has the
dragon friend feat for that. The performance skill would be used when
organizing and maintaining trade and commerse between dragons and
non-dragons.
4 answers Last reply
More about thoughts dragons character making
  1. Archived from groups: rec.games.frp.dnd (More info?)

    "Shawn Roske" <shawn_roske@sympatico.ca> wrote in message
    news:Udime.30$Ap1.17957@news20.bellglobal.com...
    > Dragons are like angels and archangels. They are fixed and do not
    > evolve. They do not have souls. They are not biological creatures,
    > they are magical manifestations of universal laws in biological forms,
    > so their ecology is different from natural animals and different from
    > humans. They are agents of dharma and the wheel of maya and so each
    > type of dragon represents an aspect of polarity and duality inherant in
    > the finite. Dragons function as direct components of the universe's
    > perpetual motion, because in a magical, fantasy universe balance can
    > easily be upset by mortal interferance. Dragons do not opperate with a
    > mindset to maintain the universal ballance, there is simply enough
    > dragons in the world to maintain the ballance, they are not antibodies,
    > more like the lymphatic system. If ballance ever did get moved out of
    > place too far no dragon would do anything about it beyond their basic
    > purpose, although good dragons might give non-dragon heros a heads-up
    > and might even offer som assistance, evil dragons could care less and
    > would only act in self-preservation. It is up to mortals to act with
    > awareness of the place of dragons in the cosmos.
    >
    > I am making a sor 1 / pal 2 character. One thing about him is his
    > profession: dragon liaison.
    >

    At the mention of 'liason' the only thing I could think of was there's the
    reason why there seem to be so many 'half-draconic' personae in D&D and
    other worlds where "Here Be Dragons'

    > feat: dragon blooded, (gold dragon +1 to all saves) dragon friend (has
    > dragon allie to call on for aid, information, or hire-- might be connect
    > to background history as mentor) war wizard (may apply int bonus to
    > attacks once a round)
    >
    > The dragon liaisons function as go between's for dragons and non-dragon
    > communities and society. My character assertains the direction and
    > purpose of a particular dragon and works for the befit of the dragon and
    > the local communities. Thus, dragons get what they want and humans and
    > humanoids benefit.
    >
    The other thing is that a 'liason' in more modern settings is called a
    diplomat, they really don't get to travel much except to and from the
    country they're assigned. From that POV I myself don't find the character
    archetype appealing, not much opportunity to adventure if you're busy having
    to wipe the dragon's ass for it all the time.

    > So, my character's profession skill could be used as a kind of dragon
    > lore skill when encountering a dragon. He would know about dragon
    > politics, wars, and treaties, individual dragons of renown (mostly the
    > old and powerful) and would know dragon etiquette.

    > This information would help his diplomacy skill, supplying information for
    > roleplaying an
    > encounter, but not really give any bonuses to a roll-- he has the
    > dragon friend feat for that. The performance skill would be used when
    > organizing and maintaining trade and commerse between dragons and
    > non-dragons.
  2. Archived from groups: rec.games.frp.dnd (More info?)

    Jerry Chesko wrote:
    > "Shawn Roske" <shawn_roske@sympatico.ca> wrote in message
    > news:Udime.30$Ap1.17957@news20.bellglobal.com...
    >
    >>Dragons are like angels and archangels. They are fixed and do not
    >>evolve. They do not have souls. They are not biological creatures,
    >>they are magical manifestations of universal laws in biological forms,
    >>so their ecology is different from natural animals and different from
    >>humans. They are agents of dharma and the wheel of maya and so each
    >>type of dragon represents an aspect of polarity and duality inherant in
    >>the finite. Dragons function as direct components of the universe's
    >>perpetual motion, because in a magical, fantasy universe balance can
    >>easily be upset by mortal interferance. Dragons do not opperate with a
    >>mindset to maintain the universal ballance, there is simply enough
    >>dragons in the world to maintain the ballance, they are not antibodies,
    >>more like the lymphatic system. If ballance ever did get moved out of
    >>place too far no dragon would do anything about it beyond their basic
    >>purpose, although good dragons might give non-dragon heros a heads-up
    >>and might even offer som assistance, evil dragons could care less and
    >>would only act in self-preservation. It is up to mortals to act with
    >>awareness of the place of dragons in the cosmos.
    >>
    >>I am making a sor 1 / pal 2 character. One thing about him is his
    >>profession: dragon liaison.
    >>
    >
    >
    > At the mention of 'liason' the only thing I could think of was there's the
    > reason why there seem to be so many 'half-draconic' personae in D&D and
    > other worlds where "Here Be Dragons'
    >
    >
    >>feat: dragon blooded, (gold dragon +1 to all saves) dragon friend (has
    >>dragon allie to call on for aid, information, or hire-- might be connect
    >>to background history as mentor) war wizard (may apply int bonus to
    >>attacks once a round)
    >>
    >>The dragon liaisons function as go between's for dragons and non-dragon
    >>communities and society. My character assertains the direction and
    >>purpose of a particular dragon and works for the befit of the dragon and
    >>the local communities. Thus, dragons get what they want and humans and
    >>humanoids benefit.
    >>
    >
    > The other thing is that a 'liason' in more modern settings is called a
    > diplomat, they really don't get to travel much except to and from the
    > country they're assigned. From that POV I myself don't find the character
    > archetype appealing, not much opportunity to adventure if you're busy having
    > to wipe the dragon's ass for it all the time.
    >


    Well, yeah, but I wasn't thinking along those lines. The idea was
    developed from the rolls I made in the hero builder's guidebook, and
    discovering the dragon-blooded and dragon friend feats. A mountain
    setting, an exotic instructor, a family business, good military minded
    fold who work a craft, known for their worth in the society yet have an
    undeserved reputation. So, not really a cloistered diplomat, more like
    an agent and representative. I also rolled diabolic enemy, so it could
    be an evil dragon-related outsider, or some other entity that is at odds
    with my characters benefactor.

    I see an ancient gold dragon in the mountains, a higher up in dragon
    politics, working unfathomable things but always towards positive ends.
    My character, being low level, is assigned to go to nearby towns and
    governments and corporations to negotitate various treaties and resource
    exchanges or to gather information. At higher levels, the assignments
    would become quests for holy objects or to destroy some evil, all part
    of dragon manuevering. His profession is to be diplomatic, yet that is
    only his job, not his character class. He is a paladin, so his heart
    rests in fighting evil.

    I don't read the profession skill as something that hinders adventuring
    or questing. Its just a job to make some gp, and the dragon's
    assignments can lead to quests anyway. I'm thinking the dragon helped
    my character move from the sorcerer class to the paladin class somehow,
    since the exotic instructor could be my char's dragon ally.

    The DMs original idea was to run a rogue campaign with a starting base
    on a sort of half-way house farm with the proprietor NPC some kind of
    treasure seeker for hire-- rehabilitating rogues to put their skills to
    positive social value.

    I saw a paladin as the straight man to the rogues, and figured he could
    be someone who frequently brings jobs to the treasure seeker. The
    adventure begins with the assignment requiring accompanying the group
    this time.


    >
    >>So, my character's profession skill could be used as a kind of dragon
    >>lore skill when encountering a dragon. He would know about dragon
    >>politics, wars, and treaties, individual dragons of renown (mostly the
    >>old and powerful) and would know dragon etiquette.
    >
    >
    >>This information would help his diplomacy skill, supplying information for
    >>roleplaying an
    >>encounter, but not really give any bonuses to a roll-- he has the
    >>dragon friend feat for that. The performance skill would be used when
    >>organizing and maintaining trade and commerse between dragons and
    >>non-dragons.
    >
    >
    >
  3. Archived from groups: rec.games.frp.dnd (More info?)

    In news:8Wjme.3650$vK5.2989@trnddc03,
    Jerry Chesko <res7g0hd@verizon.net> typed:
    > The other thing is that a 'liason' in more modern settings is called a
    > diplomat, they really don't get to travel much except to and from the
    > country they're assigned.

    It could work as a travelling diplomat-for-hire. He doesn't have a set job
    with a specific dragon but rather sells his services and knowledge of
    dragons (in general) to whoever needs it. He would of course be most
    effective in areas where he is familiar with the human society. A
    dragonslayer looking around the world for towns to save is an old idea, why
    wouldn't a dragon diplomat work?

    --
    T. Koivula
  4. Archived from groups: rec.games.frp.dnd (More info?)

    "T. Koivula" <plistat@hotmail.com> wrote in message
    news:d7hggm$5k6$1@oravannahka.helsinki.fi...
    > In news:8Wjme.3650$vK5.2989@trnddc03,
    > Jerry Chesko <res7g0hd@verizon.net> typed:
    >> The other thing is that a 'liason' in more modern settings is called a
    >> diplomat, they really don't get to travel much except to and from the
    >> country they're assigned.
    >
    > It could work as a travelling diplomat-for-hire. He doesn't have a set job
    > with a specific dragon but rather sells his services and knowledge of
    > dragons (in general) to whoever needs it. He would of course be most
    > effective in areas where he is familiar with the human society. A
    > dragonslayer looking around the world for towns to save is an old idea,
    > why
    > wouldn't a dragon diplomat work?
    >
    That only changes it to a very good NPC concept, still not something I would
    like to play as a PC. The thought, though, of the dragonslayer and dragon
    liason could make for some hilarity if the liason and slayer were hired to
    deal with the same dragon.

    --==--
    Jerry Chesko
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