Sign in with
Sign up | Sign in
Your question

throw it away

Tags:
  • CPUs
  • Playstation
  • Floppy Disk
  • Font
Last response: in CPUs
Share
February 21, 2002 9:31:29 AM

i think its time to stop puting ps2, serial, and floppy connections on mobos. do you people still use them? i haven't used my serial and floppy for over a year now.



<A HREF="http://www.geocities.com/scamtron2000/Lochel.html" target="_new"> <font color=red>click here</font color=red> </A>

More about : throw

February 21, 2002 9:45:25 AM

I use the floppy for formatting HDD's and a rescue disk for my AV SW and I use the ps2 ports for my mouse and keyboards still .. really don't want to waste a usb on either

lagger

<b><font color=blue>Checking under my north AND south bridges for trolls</font color=blue>
February 21, 2002 9:51:16 AM

floppies? yes i use it. emergency boot disks, rare occasion i need ot boot to win98 (has win2k), flash disks, memtest86 program, IBM drive testing program.

parallel port? yes. printer
serial? no
ps2? yes, keyboard only, mouse is usb

Overclocked athlon 1200C @ 8.5 x 166FSB + PC2700 = GOOD! :smile:
Related resources
February 21, 2002 10:10:23 AM

mouse and keyboard can be usb as you know and they can put every thing on cd. what do you say?

i'm thinking cheaper to manufacture and room for more usb.

<A HREF="http://www.geocities.com/scamtron2000/Lochel.html" target="_new"> <font color=red>click here</font color=red> </A>
February 21, 2002 10:35:20 AM

Not really cheaper to manufacture - we're talking pennies here. I use my floppy drive often, as well as a serial port (for my graphing calculator). And both my mouse and keyboard are PS2. Actually, my mouse is USB, but for some reason the middle button doesn't work when it's connected to USB. Odd. In any case, while one may not use these "legacy" items much, they are useful in an emergency. Consider it cheap insurance.

Kidane


Det finns inget dåligt väder - bara dåliga kläder
February 21, 2002 10:54:07 AM

I don't want to use anything USB cause IMO it sucks. I don't like laggy USB mouse and serial can be used for UPS.
February 21, 2002 11:05:16 AM

Quote:

I don't want to use anything USB cause IMO it sucks. I don't like laggy USB mouse and serial can be used for UPS.

Laggy? Is that a word? I assuming you mean that a USB mouse lags? I can tell you that for the most part, that is exactly the opposite from the truth. I generally find my USB Microsoft TrackBall Optical to be more responsive to fast movement on the USB bus than PS/2. I don't use PS/2, and I haven't used a floppy in a very very long time, I always boot from Zip or CD. I do however still use a serial port for my Palm 105's Hotsync Cradle.

AMD technology + Intel technology = Intel/AMD Pentathlon IV; the <b>ULTIMATE</b> PC processor
February 21, 2002 11:13:06 AM

yop. and you can also get the usb cradle for the palm. i'm 100% sure you know this, but i'm just making a point. i'm sure if serial was no longer made 3com would have made a usb cradle for all their palms.

<A HREF="http://www.geocities.com/scamtron2000/Lochel.html" target="_new"> <font color=red>go to my site</font color=red> </A>
Anonymous
a b à CPUs
February 21, 2002 12:22:22 PM

I still use floppy sometimes
I use my serial port for palm
I use the pal port for printer
still use PS2 port for KB, don't like to use USB KB
February 21, 2002 12:32:37 PM

yo man i nevva said nothin' about pal man. parallel port can stay. i use it too.

but its not a pal or ntsc thing here you see.

<A HREF="http://www.geocities.com/scamtron2000/Lochel.html" target="_new"> <font color=red>go to my site</font color=red> </A>
February 21, 2002 12:36:03 PM

Still need floppies when it comes time to wipe out an existing operating system. Want to see you do that without one.

I still use my serial port for my labelwriter printer. Plus, you need them for LCD displays (not the monitor ones).

I have a USB M$ Explorer, but I use the PS/2 adapter since I here it doesn't use as much CPU resources.

Intel = Ford
AMD = Chevy
Friends don't let friends drive Fords
February 21, 2002 12:57:58 PM

now what is this thing about serial for lcd?? i'll just wait for you to explain before i make a comment. i can wipe out the HDD without a floppy with no problem. you'll have to explain here too. i simply don't see why you wouldn't be able to do so!

<A HREF="http://www.geocities.com/scamtron2000/Lochel.html" target="_new"> <font color=red>go to my site</font color=red> </A>
February 21, 2002 1:06:39 PM

Removing PS2 and Serials will cause several problems. First, there are several devices that use them that are still popular and in use (Palms, lable printers, keyboards and mice...) that would be unusable or at the very least need an adapter. Also, the price of these legacy parts would start to rise as production would dwindle. Meanwhile, the lack of those features would likely hinder the selling of these newer products. So, consumers lose out on both ends, and so do manufacturers.

The floppy is still usefull as a boot device for some things. There are other ways to get around them now (Bootable CDs, Zip drives, ect), but the cost is much higher. And there is no more universal R/W portable memory unit you can be sure that anyone will have than a floppy drive.

This is a non-smoking forum.
If your computer is smoking, please extinguish it immediately.
February 21, 2002 1:20:24 PM

Quote:
now what is this thing about serial for lcd?? i'll just wait for you to explain before i make a comment.

What I meant are LCD panels that are used for displaying MP3 info, graphics, system information, whatever you like. You can find examples <A HREF="http://www.matrixorbital.com" target="_new">here at Matrix Orbital </A>.

As for the wiping out of a system, sure, if you boot from a CD-ROM, you can run a setup program to overwrite the existing one. I still find it easier, especially on my test boxes, to just use a Win9x boot disk and to fdisk and delete the partition. I guess you can do that on NT/2000/XP by deleting the existing partitions during setup, but the floppy is easier. Plus, if you ever tried to reinstall Windows on a hard drive that had Linux, you need to FDisk the master boot record. You can't do that with the setup CD.

Intel = Ford
AMD = Chevy
Friends don't let friends drive Fords
February 21, 2002 1:34:42 PM

yes yes i know, but if they stop making them, other companies will go a diffferent rout as well. they got to stop some time.

<A HREF="http://www.geocities.com/scamtron2000/Lochel.html" target="_new"> <font color=red>go to my site</font color=red> </A>
February 21, 2002 1:50:42 PM

Quote:
yop you sure can.


You can what? Delete partitions, yes, but what about overwriting a corrupt MBR?


Intel = Ford
AMD = Chevy
Friends don't let friends drive Fords
February 21, 2002 3:18:20 PM

I say get rid of all this legacy stuff - it's about time!

Floppy drives
serial ports
parallel ports
ps2 ports

If the mobo and PC manus would put USB 2.0 and IEEE1394 (Firewire/iLink) on all motherboards and provide plenty of them (8x USB + 2x 1394 on the back and 2 each on the front) it would lower the manufacturing costs for PCs and all of the peripherals. Yeah you may have some legacy devices that you still use, but an adapter isn't all that expensive if you're replacing an entire PC or motherboard/proc, etc.

Using floppies for emergency recovery is passé. I've been doing this with CD's and CD-RW's for over a year. The basic drivers just have to be installed - i.e. Win98 boot CD. A ubiquitous CD-RW write format included in the boot process would do wonders. Microsoft (and appropriate others) just need to add a "format/make boot CD" option just like with floppies.

The moment these ports start disappearing, the industry will stop making stuff for them. Most keyboards and mice are now USB with a PS2 adapter included in the box. Most new printers have USB ports. Any new serial device that isn't USB doesn't deserve a place in the market. High bandwidth devices should either be USB 2 or 1394 (or both would be better) - web/digital cams, scanners, external drives, etc.

If you don't believe that the industry can adapt that fast, I dare you to find a brand new ISA, EISA, MCA or VESALB card at your local PC shop or large on-line reseller. The second motherboards stopped carrying the slots, the peripherals disappeared. Yes, you may be able to scrounge one up somewhere (an auction site or in your old PC), but the Fry's Electronics (arguably one of if not the largest electronics stores in the US - think costco with just electronics gear) near my house doesn't even stock them. I recently asked an employee (16 yr old compu geek) if they had any ISA modems and he actually thought I was talking about DSL or Cable or something. He seemed pretty knowledgable about drives, mobos & memory, but it blew me away. How many of you teenagers out there have even seen an 8 track or Beta VCR?

It is time to get rid of the stuff that has no purpose.

I thought a thought, but the thought I thought wasn't the thought I thought I had thought.
February 21, 2002 3:47:00 PM

Were you part of the committee that helped Comcrap, uh, I mean Compaq with their iPaq project?

They tried going legacy free, and guess what, they didn't sell!!!. Corporations still have needs for legacy ports. The iPaq with the legacy ports outsold the legacy-free ones. I know of several corporations, including at least 2 major national insurance companies, that still use NT 4.0 workstation.

As for ISA slots, it is still possible to buy new Pentium 4 and Athlon boards with ISA slots. As to why, I don't know. I do have one system at home that uses an old ISA modem (which you can still pick up at Best Buy, no Fry's on the East Coast :frown: ).

Intel = Ford
AMD = Chevy
Friends don't let friends drive Fords
February 21, 2002 3:47:54 PM

Quote:
Laggy? Is that a word? I assuming you mean that a USB mouse lags? I can tell you that for the most part, that is exactly the opposite from the truth. I generally find my USB Microsoft TrackBall Optical to be more responsive to fast movement on the USB bus than PS/2. I don't use PS/2, and I haven't used a floppy in a very very long time, I always boot from Zip or CD. I do however still use a serial port for my Palm 105's Hotsync Cradle

Sorry, english isn't my native language :frown: . I have Logitech mouse that can be used either in USB or PS/2 (with adaptor). I tried it on USB but it didn't moved half that smooth in there than on PS/2. I don't want to waste my processor cycles for keeping USB alive either. And PS/2 has higher maximal refresh rate than USB, too.
February 21, 2002 4:12:13 PM

What chipset supports ISA slots for the Athlon?

To my knowledge, ISA was phazed out of use in personal computers about 4-5 years after the PCI slot came out. It takes a while to go full steam into removal.

This is a non-smoking forum.
If your computer is smoking, please extinguish it immediately.
February 21, 2002 5:26:44 PM

It's time to dump the legacy architecture. More than 16 IRQ's anyone?

<b>We are all beta testers!</b>
February 21, 2002 5:47:56 PM

The KLE133, KT133, KT133A and KM133A from Via, and the 730, and 735 from Sis.

Basically, any chipset COULD support ISA since serial and parallel ports are through an ISA architecture

Intel = Ford
AMD = Chevy
Friends don't let friends drive Fords<P ID="edit"><FONT SIZE=-1><EM>Edited by bgates2b on 02/21/02 02:53 PM.</EM></FONT></P>
February 21, 2002 6:49:37 PM

serial, used for an old 56k modem to dial up to the office using pcanywhere... and ps2 for the keyboards and mice, though usb opticals are becoming more common... floppys are useful though my main workstation doesnt have a drive, only one serial is needed, otherwise leave them

if in doubt blame microsoft...
February 21, 2002 6:57:45 PM

usb mice are less laggy by default. However, you can change the update rate of ps/2 mice with the program ps2rate. I used to use it all the time, I cant stand it when the mouse jumps alot when I move it. Ps2rate is also very useful if you have a ps/2 mouse and play alot of fps games.

<i>My life wasn't complete untill I tried sse-2 optimized pong</i>
February 21, 2002 7:26:56 PM

Quote:
What chipset supports ISA slots for the Athlon?

To my knowledge, ISA was phazed out of use in personal computers about 4-5 years after the PCI slot came out. It takes a while to go full steam into removal.

This is just 1 exemple,i could give you a lot more...

GA7ZX-R (r1.0)
CUP : A/D
CHIPSET : Via KT133A + VIA 82C686B
FSB (MHz) : 200
MEMORY : 3*SDRAM
MAX : 1.5G
IDE : UDMA 100*2 (RAID 0, RAID 1 SUPPORT)
AGP : 4X
AUDIO : CT 5880
LAN : NO
SLOTS : 5PCI/1ISA/0CNR/1AMR
SCSI : NO
DUAL BIOS : NO
Form : ATX
USB : 4* (2 USB CONNECTORS BY CABLE, OPTIONAL)
REMARK :



The faster a computer is, the faster it will reach a crashed state :eek: 
February 22, 2002 12:30:28 AM

Quote:
I do have one system at home that uses an old ISA modem (which you can still pick up at Best Buy

OK, OK, maybe I was a bit hasty with saying you can't find ISA cards. Someone has to have all that unsold, almost unsellable, long-since discontinued stock.

Quote:
The KLE133, KT133, KT133A and KM133A from Via, and the 730, and 735 from Sis.

Well any of the KTx133 and 730 chipsets are, of course, two generations ago - they're already legacy. While the one generation old SiS 735 may support ISA, I personally haven't seen a 735 based motherboard that has these slots. I checked SIS' site, and none of the mobo listed had ISA slots:

<A HREF="http://www.sis.com/wheretobuy/635735cus.htm" target="_new">http://www.sis.com/wheretobuy/635735cus.htm&lt;/A>

The issue of corporate computing and their resistance to change is an old one. I have worked in IT for companies with employees numbering in the 10's of thousands and understand this issue. One thing I have found is that if someone really has the real need for a certain technology and if the product manus really want to sell their product , they will both find a way.

When PC vendors stop selling legacy laced systems, peripheral manus will stop manufacturing legacy laced peripherals. They will also introduce "adapters" to aid in the migration.

This happened with serial ports and modems: Prior to ~1993, most PC's shiped with 8250 UARTs (the chips that control the legacy serial ports on PCs. These chips only support 9600bps. When 14.4kbps arrived and new PCs started shipping with 16450 UARTs, many corporate PCs didn't support them, so internal modems or serial adapter cards were used. The same thing happened with 28.8kbps and the 16550, etc. Large corporations have the cash to buy upgrade technology where it is needed. Peripheral manus will do what is in their best interests. It is time to get rid of these legacy ports!

I thought a thought, but the thought I thought wasn't the thought I thought I had thought.
February 22, 2002 2:27:17 AM

I wouldn't call the KT133a legacy, lots of people still use them.
Clipper is legacy.

<font color=orange>Quarter</font color=orange> <font color=blue>Pounder</font color=blue> <font color=orange>Inside</font color=orange>
a b à CPUs
February 22, 2002 2:49:50 AM

I use my floppy drive to make bios update disk for other computers, and to transfer some files to computeres that have a hard time reading CD-RW.
I use a serial port for my digital camera. Personally I think someone should have forced companies to quite making things serial only years ago. But they didn't.
My parallel port is more reliable than most USB ports.
I don't want my keyboard and mouse on USB because USB has a bad habbit of being spotty on some systems (although I haven't had that problem on my system).
I'd rather use an LS-120 to make floppy disk, but you only get four IDE ports. ZIP was a stupid idea promoted by stupid people, forcing many of us smarter people to own these drives just so we can read ZIP disk. LS-120 should have been the standard for removable media (and yes, there is LS-240 now).
USB never was a great standard, it's too slow for what it does. USB 2.0 holds promise, but I really think it stinks that we're moving to three standards (USB2.0, Firewire, and Serial ATA). We should have skipped serial ATA and USB2.0 and went to firewire for everything.

What's the frequency, Kenneth?
February 22, 2002 6:39:35 AM

yeah, great discussion. lol


if you know you don't know, the way could be more easy.
February 22, 2002 8:32:35 AM

Most motherboards dont support usb keyboards to hit del at startup, so got to keep the ps2.

"The Cash Left In My Pocket,The BEST Benchmark"
No Overclock+stock hsf=GOOD!
February 22, 2002 8:34:43 AM

Quote:
Still need floppies when it comes time to wipe out an existing operating system. Want to see you do that without one.



I can boot off my windows xp cd and reformat the harddrive, also I can repartition the harddrive, DOWN WITH THE FLOPPY!

"The Cash Left In My Pocket,The BEST Benchmark"
No Overclock+stock hsf=GOOD!
February 22, 2002 3:56:11 PM

grrrrrrrr woof woof.

ahh man so many of you guys use the stuff from the past millenium. all i'm saying is that all this stuff can be done in other ways.

<A HREF="http://www.geocities.com/scamtron2000/Lochel.html" target="_new"> <font color=red>go to my site</font color=red> </A>
a b à CPUs
February 23, 2002 12:34:26 AM

The problem is, there are too many standards. IDE was never a good choice to begin with, do to it's limmitations, but has gotten higher performance and still stuck at 2 devices per chain, sequential operation. So an IDE LS-120 would be a better choice than a floppy drive, but many systems don't have room on the IDE controllers for them.

USB is a better choice for transfering pics from a digital camara, but tell that to camara manufacturers!

PS/2 ports are fine. I would support dropping the floppy and serial ports if only manufacturers would keep current on their peripherals.

What's the frequency, Kenneth?
February 23, 2002 3:30:01 AM

yeah. and eide will not be a problem in a while too. serial ata is coming. yeah baby yeah. up to 600mb/s, only 200mb/s slower than pc100 ram in bandwith. latency is another thing.

<A HREF="http://www.geocities.com/scamtron2000/Lochel.html" target="_new"> <font color=red>go to my site</font color=red> </A>
Anonymous
a b à CPUs
February 23, 2002 6:13:22 AM

I am not sure how many of you out there that want legacy to completely go away are working in the high tech industry. Such as PC board manufacturing as an OEM or CM. I work for a company that sells manufacturing equipment to OEMs and CMs. You would be amazed at how old some of the equipment is out there that are making your high tech gadgets. Some are 10-20+ years old. If we can not get a floppy drive, VGA ISA Video card, or even one of those old HD/FD/Serial/Parallel combo controller cards to fix a customer's machine because he is losing money because he can not run production we (as a supplier) would be screwed.

Hell some of our machines need 30-pin SIMMs and one piece of our old equipment needs a 286 because anything faster is not compatible. Our previous generation of machines use ARCNET on ISA (no PCI in the machine) for networking. Almost obsolete these days.

If a company paid 1 million dollars for a production line, he ain't going to be updating when the latest and greatest it released. He will use it for as long as possible.

First time I powered up my 'puter my wife asked "Where's that swarm of bees?"
February 23, 2002 11:49:02 AM

no problem with add on, i just don't like the fact that they put the options as standard on the mobo. i think floppy, serial, and ps2 should go and firewire and usb become the standard. if any one needs the older stuff they can buy them. most of us today need the latest stuff thats out, we shouldn't be held back because of a company that has millions worth of a bit older technology.

<A HREF="http://www.geocities.com/scamtron2000/Lochel.html" target="_new"> <font color=red>go to my site</font color=red> </A>
Anonymous
a b à CPUs
February 23, 2002 11:41:30 PM

relax. the old standards will be gone in due time. there is no rush. while it would be nice to have everything run on USB 2.0 / Firewire, things are not quite there yet, but definitely tending in that direction.

as for USB having its problems - I have yet to experience them myself. I have a Razor Boomslang 2000 mouse, which uses USB. The RZ2000 has been, and probably will be for quite some time, the most precise and sensitive mouse on the planet. I also use a MS "Internet Keyboard" which utilises USB. the reason I switched to all USB is because I do not like PS/2 connectors. My motherboard (a SiS 735) recognizes USB keyboards for booting, so that is not an issue. WinXP also has a tremendous driver database so USB is not an issue there, either.
!