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Re-Setup RAID 1 on existing Drives

Tags:
  • Configuration
  • NAS / RAID
  • Computers
  • Windows 7
Last response: in Windows 7
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February 20, 2013 11:08:59 PM

I've been having some issues with a computer that belongs to CEO of the company I work for. It was built by his son in law and that son in law doesn't really have time to work on it anymore so fortunately "end of sarcasm" that responsibility falls on me.
Computer was running great until about two or three months ago where after shutting it down for the night and turning it back on in the morning would cause the computer to reboot three times after going through POST and during 4th time he was able to boot into OS (WIN7 64bit). I updated his bios and that seemed to fix the problem, BUT the computer was set in a Raid 1, but for some reason it is no longer set up that way. I see both HDD as separate HDD in "My Computer" C: & D:, both are 600GB with about 400GB of space free. How can I return them into their raid 1 configuration? MOBO is GA-X58A-UD7 Rev 2, Intel Core i7 970 cpu with 12GB DDR3 RAM Total. He has about $10,000 worth of programs on it (Electrical & Mechanical Engineer) and it would take me weeks if I had to start from scratch. Getting licenses renewed with some of these companies is a real pain in the you know what. Any help would be very appreciated.

More about : setup raid existing drives

a c 238 $ Windows 7
February 21, 2013 1:43:49 PM

During boot you will see an option to boot into the RAID controller. You will need to create a RAID 1 volume and add the two disks back into it. Check the motherboard manual for instructions. Just be sure that if any screens that pop up warning that it will destroy all data, don't do it.

You may end up needing to do a backup/restore in order to complete the task if you can't somehow get around destroying your data. In this case, create an image one of of the two raid drives. Now boot into the raid setup and configure the raid. Now restore the image to the RAID volume.
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