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CPU benchmark l0phtcrack

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March 21, 2002 5:55:13 PM

I read the last CPU article and they mentioned that not too many applications utilize the proc 100% I was wondering if the l0phtcrack utility cracking a "hard" password would be considered a good benchmark. L0phtcrack does support multiple procs. Maybe Tom could use that in the future.
March 21, 2002 6:02:09 PM

He would lose a lot of respect from major companies by using a cracking tool as a benchmark.

<font color=blue>If you don't buy Windows, then the terrorists have already won!</font color=blue> - Microsoft
March 21, 2002 6:03:28 PM

I guess if you feel that cracking passwords is a noteworthy activity. I doubt if it would relate to any real world applications. You have to wonder how many people buy a killer processor to crack passwords.

All errors are undocumented features waiting to be discovered.
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March 21, 2002 9:10:03 PM

for whatever it is worth I researched this "crack" and discovered it is commercial software designed for network admins and is not a true "crack" but rather a legitimate tool.. perhaps bauernakke has a point here

<A HREF="http://www.atstake.com/research/lc3/" target="_new"> Link here </A>

lagger

<b><font color=blue>Checking under my North<font color=red> AND</font color=red> South bridges for <font color=green>Trolls</font color=green></font color=blue>
March 21, 2002 9:16:55 PM

I still think that some of the advertisers wouldn't like it. I might be wrong.

<font color=blue>If you don't buy Windows, then the terrorists have already won!</font color=blue> - Microsoft
March 21, 2002 9:50:50 PM

Anyone concerned with MS network security knows this tool and it is not some obscure cracking software rather an invaluable admin tool for recovering passwords and checking password policies.

Lagger I like your sig :) 
March 21, 2002 10:18:38 PM

Quote:
I still think that some of the advertisers wouldn't like it. I might be wrong.

probably true .. it is is unfortunately named and does appear to be a warez oriented piece at first blush

lagger

<b><font color=blue>Checking under my North<font color=red> AND</font color=red> South bridges for <font color=green>Trolls</font color=green></font color=blue>
March 21, 2002 10:19:39 PM

Quote:
Lagger I like your sig :) 

Why thanx :smile:

lagger

<b><font color=blue>Checking under my North<font color=red> AND</font color=red> South bridges for <font color=green>Trolls</font color=green></font color=blue>
March 21, 2002 10:31:52 PM

Calculation of Pi is good too

Proving once again that <A HREF="http://www.zombo.com" target="_new">anything is possible</A>.
March 22, 2002 12:18:58 AM

Indeed. I never let my computer pass a day without getting it to calculate Pi.

Sorry, but this isn't a day to day task either.

<b><font color=blue>~ Whew! Finished...Now all I need is a Cyrix badge ~ </font color=blue> :wink: </b>
March 22, 2002 12:25:00 AM

Can somebody explain to me why is Pi often taken as something very rigorous to the CPU or what is the thing behind it?
I mean as a student, I know it's a math function for finding circumference, surfaces, volumes and such, but I don't know why the heck is there fuss on it for CPUs...

--
For the first time, Hookers are hooked on Phonics!!
March 22, 2002 1:22:30 AM

it requires massive calculation to continue to reach the full (unreachable) decimal and so it takes a lot of cpu power .. there are similar programs that strive to derive primes

lagger

<b><font color=blue>Checking under my North<font color=red> AND</font color=red> South bridges for <font color=green>Trolls</font color=green></font color=blue>
March 22, 2002 1:25:35 AM

What I think Eden is trying to say is how the computer calculates the seemingly endless digits? What formula/algorithm does it use to continuously calculate the digits of Pi?

AMD technology + Intel technology = Intel/AMD Pentathlon IV; the <b>ULTIMATE</b> PC processor
March 22, 2002 2:14:50 AM

division I reckon as it is a fraction

lagger

<b><font color=blue>Checking under my North<font color=red> AND</font color=red> South bridges for <font color=green>Trolls</font color=green></font color=blue>
March 22, 2002 2:18:21 AM

Well not as much as to why would CPUs have a hard time making this calc.
What programs would use Pi for testing CPU anyway?
And how does the test end if there is none?

--
For the first time, Hookers are hooked on Phonics!!
March 22, 2002 3:44:19 AM

Quote:
Indeed. I never let my computer pass a day without getting it to calculate Pi.

Obviously, you don't have Pi@Home yet. Helping to calcuate it daily.

Bad trolls Bad trolls... Whacha gonna do... Whacha gonna do when they post here too...
March 22, 2002 4:44:41 AM

Quote:
What programs would use Pi for testing CPU anyway?
And how does the test end if there is none?

Something called SuperPi is one program. You tell it to how many digits you want it to calculate pi, one million for example, and then it does it and gives you the time for how long it took. It's one way to compare the processing power of different CPUs.


<i>I made you look. But I can't make you see.</i><P ID="edit"><FONT SIZE=-1><EM>Edited by tlaughrey on 03/22/02 01:57 AM.</EM></FONT></P>
March 22, 2002 5:08:10 AM

Pi is a Transcendental number, meaning it cannot be expressed finitely. Also, there is no patterns, or repetitions, meaning with Pi you can never be 100% accurate. Transcendental numbers cannot be expressed as the root of any algebraic equation with rational coefficients. Pi CAN be expressed as an endless continued fraction or as the limit of an infinite series.

pi transcends the power of algebra to display it in its totality. Using a fixed-size font, it can't be written on a piece of paper as big as the universe.

Programs that calculate Pi ask, "to what decimal place" and fill your CPU until it finds out that it equals 3.141592654...

if you feel like doing a home experiment, take a glass (round one), and a bendable measuring tape, measure the diameter (across the glass at the widest) and the circumference (around the glass where you measured the diameter) divide the circumference by the diameter... you should be close to Pi, otherwise your measuring skills suck...


:wink: Engineering is the science of making life simple, by making it more complicated.
March 22, 2002 5:42:16 AM

u ARE kidding right?

Toms Forums. Destroying my sanity
one braincell at a time. :smile:
March 22, 2002 9:34:16 PM

Still, How accurate of a circle does anybody need? I know it would be good for a benchmark if everybody woud see how long it would take to get to the 5,000'th integer, but still....

Crashing takes on a whole new meaning at 9.8 m/s. :tongue:
March 22, 2002 10:18:53 PM

I'm afraid not.

The only pi I ever see are mince pies, macaroni pies, and steak pies.

<b><font color=blue>~ Whew! Finished...Now all I need is a Cyrix badge ~ </font color=blue> :wink: </b>
!