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Gradually rising CPU and MB temps

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April 7, 2002 5:57:18 PM

First, I do know that dust is a great insulator, and do my best to keep the case dust-free.

Okay, my question is this: Since the fall, both my CPU and MB temps have slowly crept up to where they are today (26C MB and 55C CPU). They used to hover around 23C MB and 50C CPU. Now I'm thinking that my MB temp has gone up because there is more heat being pulled off than before. So, I ask, does Arctic Silver II dry up and become ineffective over time? I'm thinking that maybe I should reseat my HSF, see if that helps, but considering that my tube of ASII is about 45 min away, it's not something I can just up and do. Any other suggestions? (I already looked at my case intake fan and saw that the grill was completely blocked with dust. I removed that and my MB temp went down 1-2C, but the CPU temp stayed at around 55C.)

-SammyBoy
April 7, 2002 6:03:09 PM

What mobo do you have?

Could just be that dust collected in the case and on the mobo, which can heat things up quick. As for the CPU...thermal paste will wear out eventually. But not like in a year. You could reapply the As2, but make sure the tube isn't hard and dry. Has to be fresh still.

"When there's a will, there's a way."
April 7, 2002 6:25:53 PM

Hmm... probably help to list the system specs.

Antec 830SX with an intake and vent fan
AMD Athlon "C" 1.2GHz, AMD-supplied HSF
Asus A7A266

I just thought about opening the case and aiming my house fan in there to blow out the loose dust. I ran out of canned air, so I can't remove the fine layer that collects. Any vacuums out there that <i>won't</i> ESD my whole system?

-SammyBoy
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April 7, 2002 8:43:47 PM

You could take the kind of vacuums with long hoses and make a simple mod. At the end of the nozzle, make a governor that restricts the air flow to only about 1/4 of an inch. That way, you can suck up very specific sections of the case and mobo. I would also buy another can of air in case you need to get even more exact in the process.

AthlonC's and the AMD HSFs tend to run around 40-45 in my experiences. I think it may float around a little bit after time, but I wouldn't worry too much unless the heat moves up to more than 50 degrees celsius.

"When there's a will, there's a way."
April 7, 2002 11:03:14 PM

First, is the vacuum grounded? Since most vacuums I know have plastic all about, I'd be afraid that I would build up a charge and zap my system. I know there are vacuums specially made for electronics work, but I don't think those are within my budget.

-SammyBoy
April 7, 2002 11:06:26 PM

Well, I meant you would need a small hand powered one. You can purchase some electornically shielded PVC nozzles or just ground out the hose itself. The best thing would just be to make sure the hose is touching the ground during the process. Just make sure you release the static charge before cleaning out the system. I'd shoot for $60-80 for the vacuum and $5 for the special nozzle and hose.

"When there's a will, there's a way."
April 7, 2002 11:51:35 PM

most all electronics are grounded... you know the "ground" part of the plug? that typically grounds the <font color=blue>case</font color=blue> of the equipment...

:wink: Engineering is the science of making life simple, by making it more complicated.
April 8, 2002 1:47:37 AM

Not always...a case is partially electronic and isn't grounded. I guess some things could be grounded though.

"When there's a will, there's a way."
April 8, 2002 5:48:23 AM

Let me clarify what a ground is FOR...

Most electrical devices have their outer cases grounded through the third prong of a three pronged plug (try saying that five times as fast as you can!). This is a safety feature which prevents the case of a device, whether it is a laboratory instrument or a washing machine, from having a high voltage on it due to a short circuit. A short circuit will then cause a large current to flow to ground an blow a fuse. If it is not grounded, the current could flow through anyone who touches it (ouch!), also many electrical circuits use ground as a return path for the current, (in a circuit diagram, anything shown as going to ground could be connected to form an equivalent circuit, thus the PSU is grounded, along with your computer case, (if your PSU is connected with conductive screws)

:wink: Engineering is the science of making life simple, by making it more complicated.
April 8, 2002 5:48:40 PM

Which doesn't help a vacuum much, since plastic nozzles don't conduct electricity too well, but can still build up a static charge. In that case, it will ESD my system. Anywho... I'm perplexed as to why my system keeps staying high temp wise. For the longest time, I could keep the case at 23, 24C without a problem, and now it constantly hovers at 28C, which is making my CPU run hotter. When it's at 23C, the CPU is around 50C. Again, it's a 1.2GHz T-Bird "C", so I don't think that's too out of line for the AMD supplied HSF, but 57C is. Since I've cleaned out the fans so that they don't have any more dust on them, I still can't understand why my case temp remains high. Any suggestiong?

-SammyBoy
April 8, 2002 6:01:36 PM

This may seem like a stupid question, but have you checked your room temps? maybe the temperature in your room is getting higher, or your thermostat is higher...

other than that, i don't know... could be the diodes wearing out... also have you flashed your bios? sometimes MB makers increase the reading of the sensors. Could be thermal paste... i really wouldn't worry unless you are having stability problems... just make sure your case is relatively clean from dust, and that you have decent airflow

:wink: Engineering is the science of making life simple, by making it more complicated.
April 9, 2002 12:45:27 AM

Well, I think my AS2 wore out. I went down to Radio Shack and got a tube of their stuff, and now my 1.2GHz processor is running at a cool 51C @1.4GHz. I also cleaned out my case by getting myself a new can of air, and also got a lot of the dust off the HSF. Granted, my room temps do affect it (the room is 20C, with the CPU at 48C) but before I opened the windows it was still keeping the CPU cooler when the case temp was up around 26C. Needless to say, I'm rather disapointed that the AS2 dried up like that. I didn't think that was supposed to happen. Ah well, problem solved, and I can again overclock without worry.

-SammyBoy
April 9, 2002 3:26:05 AM

No sh*t Sherlock =/

"When there's a will, there's a way."
April 9, 2002 4:37:43 AM

wtf?

:wink: Engineering is the science of making life simple, by making it more complicated.
April 10, 2002 1:15:10 AM

I KNOW WHAT IT MEANS. DON'T LECTURE ME PLEASE =p

"When there's a will, there's a way."
April 10, 2002 1:24:42 AM

Quote:
Not always...a case is partially electronic and isn't grounded. I guess some things could be grounded though.


sorry i guess i didn't understand what you meant by your statement... all i wanted to reinforce was that (unless you saw off the ground on your power cord) your computer case, along with most all electronic's cases are grounded... i apologize that you took this offensively.

:wink: Engineering is the science of making life simple, by making it more complicated.
April 10, 2002 1:26:45 AM

I've seen some crappy cases and PSUs that DON'T have a ground cable. Yep, it really bites when they short out a $1000+ computer.

"When there's a will, there's a way."
!