AMD News

You might find <A HREF="http://www.penstarsys.com/editor/AMD/64/index.html" target="_new">this</A> interesting. The T-Bred is going to be a very short lived core for AMD. The Barton should be released 3 months later.

AMD technology + Intel technology = Intel/AMD Pentathlon IV; the <b>ULTIMATE</b> PC processor
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  1. While most of us knew that just a few days ago, I first thought of 4 months, but 3 sounds more accurate! I think AMD is changing strategies to make do for the current Northwoods, then go for a Barton and raise a little competition. It seems they will do it on time, and that Hammer is likely to come out this year!

    --
    Thunderbirds in wintertime, Northwoods in summertime! :lol:
  2. The article even suggests that the Barton may inherit 64-bit support from the Hammer. Also, the Duron will be discontinued by year-end.

    AMD technology + Intel technology = Intel/AMD Pentathlon IV; the <b>ULTIMATE</b> PC processor
  3. I wouldn't count on Barton supporting 64-bit, this is completely the author's speculations. Gotta admit though, it would be nice to go with a Barton and know that you could always upgrade the OS to 64-bit, instead of having to by a Hammer and hope that 64-bit goes mainstream quickly.
  4. This guy has absolutely no clue what he's talking about. Adding x86-64 to Barton, but no explanation of how exactly that's going to work? (Especially with supposedly only adding 5% to the die size)

    Also, he mentions Windows XP 64 bit will work on x86-64, when everyone knows that it has been written in IA64, which will not run on an x86-64 processor.

    He uses absolutely no facts, and very, very few explanations even, to back up his statements.

    <font color=blue>If you don't buy Windows, then the terrorists have already won!</font color=blue> - Microsoft
  5. Well, don't you think it is possible that Microsoft is working on an x86-64 version? I mean, the IA64 is not meant for mainstream desktop/workstation computers, but for high-end servers, scientific applications, and large clusters, where Windows isn't neccessarily the product of choice. Considering the speculation that Intel is working on an x86-64 chip, it seems very plausible to think that there will be a 64-bit version of Windows that will be x86-64 compatible. However, I agree that it is ridicuous to say Barton will have 64-bit compatibility, as the Barton is simply a Thoroughbred with 512K L2 Cache.

    "Trying is the first step towards failure."
  6. Of course it's possible (even probable) that Microsoft will produce an x86-64 OS. But I think it's unlikely that they'll have two OSes named "Windows XP 64-bit", and they already have one for IA64.

    <font color=blue>If you don't buy Windows, then the terrorists have already won!</font color=blue> - Microsoft
  7. Why not have two OS named Win XP64? They could do try something like Win XP64 professional (IA64) and WinXP64 Home (x86-64).
  8. Not too shabby!
    Indeed Home would signify home users, and a Pro version could also be used for the server market with Quad SledgeHammers, while WinXP 64 plain is IA64!

    --
    Thunderbirds in wintertime, Northwoods in summertime! :lol:
  9. Or they could just add a funky letter differentiating between the two different version of WinXP. WinXP X64 for x86-64 and WinXP 64 for IA-64 perhaps?

    AMD technology + Intel technology = Intel/AMD Pentathlon IV; the <b>ULTIMATE</b> PC processor
  10. Right, my point was that I got the feeling the author though that one OS would work on both CPUs.

    <font color=blue>If you don't buy Windows, then the terrorists have already won!</font color=blue> - Microsoft
  11. I think this guy is reading too much into AMD's annoucements. I think that the following is far more likely.

    The Athlon name has been around awhile and the marketing department probably would like a refresh. Acknowledging the fact that you need to segment the market into power and budget users, by dropping the Duron name it simply implies that the Barton will not be called just Athlon but something new like Athlon Pro/Plus/Whatever (unlikely to actually be a whole new name).

    The Clawhammer is a whole different ballgame. Going 64bit takes time (just ask Intel, Sun & IBM). There are three ways that x86-64 will be implemented to get market traction.

    1) SUN has pretty much stated that they will use ClawHammer in it's 1-2 cpu Cobalt Edge Server devices running SUN's own distribution of Linux which will be 64-bit only. This will account for over 250,000 cpu sales in the first year. The number will increase with other Linux vendors following the same route. Not a bad start considering the IA64 numbers.

    2) Microsoft are desperate to get further into the datacentre and Clawhammer will allow the multitude of MS developers to work on their Win XP64 (x86-64 version) solutions prior to the introduction of the SledgeHammer which should allow MS to deliver alot of power in a box.

    3) AMD have also positioned themselves well having created a new front in the German deveopment community pitching Linux & Apache vs WinXP 64 & IIS. This is why MS have recently increased their developers in Germany (by 200) and why x86-64 will get MS support.


    <font color=blue> Smoke me a Chip'er ... I'll be back in the Morgan </font color=blue> :eek:
  12. Quote:
    SUN has pretty much stated that they will use ClawHammer in it's 1-2 cpu Cobalt Edge Server devices running SUN's own distribution of Linux which will be 64-bit only.


    Where did you hear that, that's interesting?

    <font color=blue>If you don't buy Windows, then the terrorists have already won!</font color=blue> - Microsoft
  13. ~ Where did you hear that, that's interesting? ~

    <i> * Sun will ship for the first time a full implementation of Linux on a new line of general-purpose servers aimed at providing "edge" services to environments such as workgroups and remote offices. New single- and multiprocessor systems, to be announced mid-year, will use the x86 architecture and be capable of running thousands of Linux applications natively.
    * Sun will dramatically expand its line of Sun Cobalt[tm] Linux appliances, the world's leading Linux-based appliance systems. Look for innovations beyond the current eight-inch-square Qube[tm] and the 1.75-inch-high rack-mountable configurations. Sun's Cobalt server appliances start around $1000 and have an installed base of more than 100,000 units. </i>

    Thats from Sun's website but it doesn't fully backup what I said, but I can't be bother searching for the rest of the relevant information. However Sun & AMD have been sharing IP like crazy with Sun utilizing Hypertransport and AMD using on-die memory controllers to mention but two instances. The old adage goes the 'enemy of my enemy is my friend'.

    Also Sun has had massive success with Cobalt running linux on x86, Sun can really ramp up the capability of these edge devices by going to dual ClawHammers and 64bit linux (who do you think is funding SuSe!).

    And why wouldn't Sun want to do this. A dual Clawhammer with around 5Ghz of power with 2*4GB of memory provides you with an awesome webserver with all of the site information held in memory for well under USD10K. That's a machine well worth having and is vastly better than anything Wintel can provide.
    If you scourer the net you will find supporting evidence but it's simply an evolution of Sun's Cobalt product, not revolutionary at all.

    <font color=blue> Smoke me a Chip'er ... I'll be back in the Morgan </font color=blue> :eek:
  14. Quote:
    A dual Clawhammer with around 5Ghz of power with 2*4GB of memory provides you with an awesome webserver with all of the site information held in memory for well under USD10K.


    We still know nothing officially about clockspeeds, performance or price. I'm not as sure about that as you seem to be.

    I found something at InfoSatellite about Sun and Clawhammer, but it merely referenced a story at the Inquirer. When I clicked on their link to go to the Inqwell's site, I got several porn popups instead of the proper website (I'm at work, mind you), so I can't verify the information.

    <font color=blue>If you don't buy Windows, then the terrorists have already won!</font color=blue> - Microsoft
  15. Im really sceptical that AMD would make their entire line 64 bit compatible. Whats the point? Without the OS, it wont work, if ya get the OS you still need some ultra-high-end apps to utilize the 64-bit part. And a LOT of memory too.
    The only reason would be to convince the masses 64 is better than 32. The average consumer thinks 64 is twice as big as 32 so "it must be better". So AMD may do it from a purely "fleece the retarded masses" standpoint.
    I think the delays on T-bred and the possibilty of Barton have a far more simple explanation. Here is what I have read:
    1. T-bred may have a short lifespan. With Barton being introduced as a non-SOI chip.

    ** that simply tells me AMD cant get SOI working in time to make Barton an SOI chip. So phase out T-bred quick. And say Barton is the next greatest thing (hoping everyone forgets they promised SOI for barton). If they throw in a few architectural improvements on Barton, thats simply to compete with Intel until Hammer arrives. I mean, how gay would it be to get a .13 Barton that didnt offer much performance improvement?
    I dunno, the whole Barton/ T-bred thingy sounds like a stalling tactic until Hammer. If this were tennis, this is how the match would look.

    Intel over-head smashes the ball into AMDs court with the P4 Northwood. AMD backs up (t-bred) to return fire and decides to tie their shoes. (barton). They miss the ball (no release) and home to score big in the next round (Hammer).

    Benchmarks are like sex, everybody loves doing it, everybody thinks they are good at it.
  16. Great visual description.... :lol:
  17. too late, i saw it.
    you have made a mistake with "fwe". lol


    if <b>you know</b> <font color=white>you don't know<i><font color=black>, the way could be more easy ...<font color=red>
  18. I made a typo and you made a coherent post. It's a red letter day!!

    <font color=blue>If you don't buy Windows, then the terrorists have already won!</font color=blue> - Microsoft
  19. yes, you are right. rofl.


    <i>if <b>you know</b> <font color=white>you don't know<font color=black>, the way could be more easy ...<font color=red>
  20. straight from the page:

    Quote:
    This article as a whole should be viewed as speculation based on known facts from AMD and the market. This article should not be taken as fact, nor have I received any information from AMD about the contents of this article.

    so prety much the guy is just talking out of his ass...great link.

    no vestige of a beginning, no prospect of an end, when we all disintegrate, it'll all happen again.
  21. There's a difference between writing possible speculation and science fiction, apparenlty this guy didn't realize that.

    <font color=blue>If you don't buy Windows, then the terrorists have already won!</font color=blue> - Microsoft
  22. Actually the likelyhood of this being true is pretty good. AMD can't afford to split up production their FABs between too many different processors, atleast according to a couple of articles that have been written. By limiting themselves to a couple of basic designs, they save on manufacturing costs. They could plan on selling the processors that work flawlessly in 64bit mode as an actual hammer, but if they detect any problems or it's just not a good performer, they could market that same chip as a Barton as long the 32bit performs according to specs. AMD and Intel do the same type of thing based on processor performance/GHz ratings. At least that's the way I see it.
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