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Set your Senators' email on fire!

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April 23, 2002 3:56:59 AM

Well, you know once <A HREF="http://www.startribune.com/stories/535/2244930.html" target="_new">this</A> makes a "large" newspaper (well, the largest in MN) that it's time for the public to speak. I'm talking about the so-called anti-piracy bill (<A HREF="http://frwebgate.access.gpo.gov/cgi-bin/getdoc.cgi?dbna..." target="_new">S.F 2048</A>) introduced by Senator Hollins, D-S.C.

It's tripe, and a thinly veiled attempt by the RIAA to control all access to music. I see it as having the effect of killing indie groups who use the internet to spread their MP3s so that people can know who they are. And, it makes it easy for them to have one master copy and burn as many as needed. That would be near impossible under this bill. Yes, it does not say that specifically, but by limiting the ability of retail products from being sold unless they have hardware encoding that looks for certain bytes of data, etc., unless you ante up the money to buy software to put that in your recordings, you are screwed. Also, it pushes the currently legal practice of ripping and mixing the CDs you personally own into a legal gray area, and also has the possiblity of making audio cd's completely unreadable to a computer (some discs like this have shown up in Europe, which specifically say that they will not work on a PC). And last, I suspect that the RIAA is feeling shorted since they haven't been able to capitalize on the Internet Revolution, so what better way to make money from the internet then by making encoded MP3s, WMAs, etc. that are readable only if a certain data key is used by the decoding software, which would be sold by RIAA affiliates.

This is total and utter crap, and something needs to be done. The first step is to <A HREF="http://www.senate.gov/senators/senator_by_state.cfm" target="_new">write your senators.</A> Tell them that you won't stand for this. Next, spread the word to other people who enjoy personal freedoms, telling the to write their senators. And once that ball is rolling, a second protest needs to be organized. One that will hit the RIAA right in the pocketbook. Using the internet, I think we could set up a day or week where people will not purchase CDs. Yes, I understand that artists need to make money, but from what I know, they get a slim to near zero slice of the profits pie. Kinda like game developers. It really sucks for them.

-SammyBoy
April 23, 2002 4:43:18 AM

Uhm this was shot down like 2 weeks ago unless this is a new one.

<font color=red>:</font color=red> <font color=white>:</font color=white> <font color=blue>:</font color=blue>
April 23, 2002 8:04:30 PM

It wasn't shot down at all, and if Gateway feels the need to throw its weight behind the opposition of the bill, then I still say it's viable. This is news as of April 22nd, 2002. That means it's all new. Get your butts in gear and shoot this thing down for good! If you look at the status of the bill, it's in the conference committee for review. Not exactly dead, is it?

-SammyBoy
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April 23, 2002 9:42:41 PM

You're absolutely right, we all have to do whatever we can to kill this bill. We can't let the RIAA and movie industry dictate what technology we're allowed to use in our PC.

<i>Money talks. Mine always likes to say "goodbye." :smile: </i>
April 23, 2002 9:50:46 PM

Here's a synopsis of what this bill will accomplish and what the recording and movie industries would like to accomplish:

"Senator Hollings' proposed Consumer Broadband and Digital Television Promotion Act (CBDTPA) will require every new digital technology to go through a punishing 12-month review process where Hollywood's representatives will dictate, at lawyerpoint, what features must and must *not* be included.

But Hollywood has prepared a back-up plan in the event that consumer outrage stops the CBDTPA. The Motion Picture Association of American's Copy Protection Technology Working Group has convened a special committee in Los Angeles called the Broadcast Protection Discussion Group (BPDG). The BPDG is working with a committee of technologists, cable- and satellite-operators and broadcasters to establish a "standard" for all devices that can receive or record digital television signals. (The FCC will require all over-the-air TV broadcasts to be digital by the year 2006.)

Needless to say, this "standard" will restrict your freedom to record, share, archive and re-use digital television programming, but how it will accomplish this is even more sinister. The BPDG's standard is intended to be enacted into law. All digital television technologies -- including those that integrate with your personal computer -- will be subjected to the standard. It will be illegal to manufacture or distribute nonstandard technology. New technologies will only come to market if Hollywood's executives -- the people who tried to ban the VCR in 1984 -- approve them."

That quote comes from <A HREF="http://www.eff.org/alerts/20020412_eff_gateway_alert.ht..." target="_new">this</A> site.

Pretty sinister stuff that all consumers need to be made aware of.

<i>Money talks. Mine always likes to say "goodbye." :smile: </i>
April 23, 2002 10:41:31 PM

All the more reason to email your senators. While I have no problem with trying to make it harder for pirates to illegally copy and distribue DVDs and CDs, I do have issues with this bill. It gives the RIAA and Hollywood almost exclusive power over an area that should have multi-industry control. If they are allowed to have exclusive control over PC hard and software, then we can say goodbye to innovations. I'm surprised companies like NVidia, ATI (AIW series would be in jepordy), and other companies that make money off the legal use of DVDs and CDs aren't up in arms about this. Anyone on here with close enough connections to those companies able to convince them to try to block this bill?

-SammyBoy
April 23, 2002 10:46:44 PM

These bastards need to be set straight...I have a plan...but will it work?

I'm sick of seeing these greedy pigs try and say how much they loose due to data/media piracy. It's my personal opinion that such things account for far more free marketing than true loss of income. And their figures on how much is being lost is rediculous. They base their numbers on an obsurd theory: Everyone who has obtained or viewed the pirated materials is a lost customer, at full retail value per incident. I don't know about you guys, but I think they're heads won't be coming out of there soon.

In order for this plan to work, we must reach as many people as possible...and I have to think of the plan, too!

:p 

but seriously...I do have an idea, but let me sit on it and make sure it's as good as it can get...then, would anyone wish to participate in a direct "assault" on the perpetrators. It will be a perfectly legal, and very effective approach (if it reaches enough folks).

I must obtain a list of supporters of these measures alike. That is step 1.


If I don't get my 90THz AMD Quadraplex system soon, I'm afraid I may just combust right here.
April 24, 2002 5:18:32 AM

*bump*
April 25, 2002 2:14:00 AM

I don't think I should be doing any bumps right now...I really should be going to sleep.

Oh...the plan. Ah, who the hell cares...that was yesterday...


If I don't get my 90THz AMD Quadraplex system soon, I'm afraid I may just combust right here.
!