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How to connect a laptop to desktop?

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April 25, 2002 3:35:40 AM

Well I'm guessing some of you read my thread about getting a laptop =(

So what do I need to quickly and easily transfer files from my laptop to my desktop?

I did a search for docking stations on newegg, but I don't think any came up. =(

<font color=blue> There's no such thing as hell, but you can make it if you try.</font color=blue>

More about : connect laptop desktop

April 25, 2002 3:41:46 AM

As long as you have NICs on either end just connect an RJ 45 cable to each and send the files via your new little network.

I can't think of a good signature so I'll use this one.
April 25, 2002 3:43:46 AM

you can set up a really simple network using an ethernet adapter on each machine and a patch or crossover cable...probably easiest and most cost effective way as the only extra thing you need is the crossover ethernet cord
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April 25, 2002 4:03:03 AM

is this an older laptop?

1. install a pmcia ethernet card(like linksys or dlink) card into the laptop and network it to the desktop. this is fast.

2. zip disk. fast.

3. get a dicect cable, use interlnk server and client that comes with win95 or at Microsoft. this is slow as hell.

"<b>AMD/VIA!</b>...you are <i>still</i> the weakest link, good bye!"
April 25, 2002 4:16:19 AM

you have a serial post on your labtop. If so do a direct serial connect.

You GeForce Ti4xxx is faster then my R8500 but my R8500 is the king of Aniso baby :cool:
April 25, 2002 4:42:26 AM

My computer will have a 3COM NIC PCI installed (or an onboard).

My laptop comes standard with a 10/100 ethernet port.

So all I need is a short RJ-45 cable? Do I need some special software.

Oh this is also important. My laptop will run Windows 2000 Pro, and my PC windows XP home. Any conflicts if I were to use an ethernet to transfer files?

<font color=blue> There's no such thing as hell, but you can make it if you try.</font color=blue>
April 25, 2002 6:38:10 AM

unless you have a hub, you'll need a cross over cable, not just a standard Cat 5.
just ask for one, if they don't know what you're talking about, go somewhere else.

<i>Better to be silent and thought an idiot than to speak and remove all doubt.</i>
April 25, 2002 6:43:53 AM

Buy a crossover cable.

<font color=red>God</font color=red> <font color=blue>Bless</font color=blue> <font color=red>America!</font color=red>
April 25, 2002 6:54:48 AM

crossover cable and windows is all you need then. 2000 and xp will have no problem.

<font color=green>"No Thoroughbred for you! Come back, 2 weeks."</font color=green>
a b à CPUs
April 25, 2002 4:05:23 PM

Crossover cable. My dealer charges $5 to flip them, same price for replacing an end in standard or crossover configuration.

What's the frequency, Kenneth?
April 25, 2002 5:24:18 PM

If they use the same operating system, will I need a crossover cable?

And is the crossover cable the same as the RJ 45 cable?

Thanks. By transferring stuff via vire, I can save serious cash by not buying a dvd/cdrw combo.

<font color=blue> There's no such thing as hell, but you can make it if you try.</font color=blue>
a b à CPUs
April 25, 2002 6:57:34 PM

A crossover cable is nothing more than a standard RJ-45 cable that's been flipped on one end so you can hook two computers directly to each other.

What's the frequency, Kenneth?
April 25, 2002 7:36:23 PM

Once I buy a crossover cable (is this what I would ask for if I call a computer hardware store?), what software do I need to transfer files between two computers?

If I don't need special software, how would I transfer then? Something in windows?

<font color=blue> There's no such thing as hell, but you can make it if you try.</font color=blue>
a b à CPUs
April 25, 2002 9:17:37 PM

Everything you need is in windows. I normally use the Net BOUI protocol, which you can load in Controll Panel under Network. Also enable file sharing there.
Then make your hard drive on the laptop shared by right clicking on it in "My Computer" and sliding down to the "Sharing" icon on the dropdown menu.
Now you can use "network neighborhood" to locate the shared notebook drive on you desktop. You can even right click on that drive and make it a "mapped network drive". All free, easy stuff.

What's the frequency, Kenneth?
April 25, 2002 9:30:10 PM

I goto Windows XP control panel and select "network connections."

All it has is a network setup wizard.
It says this, too.

"If your home is wired for Ethernet, similar to phone wiring, you can connect your computers using Ethernet jacks in the wall. Otherwise, you must use a network hub to connect your computers together."


So where do I get a "network hub"? And how to I use it? =(

If I plug both my laptop/desktop into ethernet jacks on campus, then they won't be connected to each other obviously, and will be running through my college.

Anyone? Thanks.

Oh, the two computers I will be connecting, one uses XP, one uses 2000. According to xp...

"The Network Setup Wizard is only supported on computers using Windows 98, Windows 98 Second Edition, Windows Millennium Edition, Windows XP Home Edition, or Windows XP Professional."

huh.

<font color=blue> There's no such thing as hell, but you can make it if you try.</font color=blue>
a b à CPUs
April 25, 2002 10:56:10 PM

A hub does two things-it allows you to use more than one computer on one line, and it acts like a crossover between two computers on the hub. MS doesnt' want you to get a $5 cable, they want you to get a $50 hub, but you can use the cable. You can also hook it up to the two jacks at the school and yes, access one from the other, as long as you have a compatable protocol on both, such as netBoui, and sharing on the drive you want to access. I live on campus and have access to around 20 other computers that use netBoui, but all of them have passwords on the shared drives so it does me know good.

What's the frequency, Kenneth?
April 25, 2002 11:11:08 PM

So hooking the two computers up with just a cable will work under Windows without a hub?

The XP message implies you NEED a hub. So in otherwords, I just connect the two comps using an RJ45 cable, then run the networking wizard, right?



<font color=blue> There's no such thing as hell, but you can make it if you try.</font color=blue>
a b à CPUs
April 26, 2002 2:29:39 AM

You have to use a "crossover" cable if you have no hub. A "Crossover" cable is an RJ-45 cable with the data wires switched around on one end. Using a "crossover" cable eliminates the need for a hub. Everything else remains the same.

What's the frequency, Kenneth?
April 26, 2002 3:24:40 AM

How hard is it to make a crossover cable? Which color wires need to be switched?

<font color=red>God</font color=red> <font color=blue>Bless</font color=blue> <font color=red>America!</font color=red>
April 26, 2002 4:09:53 AM

Where can I get a crossover cable? =)

<font color=blue> There's no such thing as hell, but you can make it if you try.</font color=blue>
April 26, 2002 4:23:43 AM

Quote:
The XP message implies you NEED a hub. So in otherwords, I just connect the two comps using an RJ45 cable, then run the networking wizard, right?

don't worry about it. Just connect both PC's with a crossover cable, run the wizards and ready.
I did the same a couple of weeks ago for a friend:
compaq laptop Win 98 with PCMCIA network (Dlink) and desktop Win Me. No problems.
April 26, 2002 4:23:55 AM

A regular CAT 5 patch cable won't work unless you know which wires to switch and have a tool to crimp it a new end on. Go to Office Depot, Best Buy, or Staples and spend <A HREF="http://www.staples.com/Catalog/Browse/SKU.asp?BCFlag=Fa..." target="_new">$5.95</A> for a 3' or <A HREF="http://www.staples.com/Catalog/Browse/SKU.asp?BCFlag=Fa..." target="_new">$12.98</A> for a 10'. I bought the 10' for a printer but 3' might be enough for you. I would follow Crash's instructions on the software part. Use your system with 2000 and search for "file sharing" under Help. Just follow the instructions

<font color=green>"No Thoroughbred for you! Come back, 2 weeks."</font color=green>
April 26, 2002 5:26:11 AM

Do I run Network Wizard on the PC first or the laptop first? Or it don't matter. Sorry if this seems like a stupid question.


<font color=blue> There's no such thing as hell, but you can make it if you try.</font color=blue>
April 26, 2002 6:46:32 AM

A monkey could get a network up and running on WinXP. Just run the home networking wizard on each one, I don't think the order matters, and you're good to go. If the network ever stops working, there's an option to "repair" the network. That will have you up and running again.

<font color=red>God</font color=red> <font color=blue>Bless</font color=blue> <font color=red>America!</font color=red>
April 26, 2002 8:22:19 AM

2000 will network with xp right?

<font color=blue> There's no such thing as hell, but you can make it if you try.</font color=blue>
April 26, 2002 8:25:25 AM

Definitely. So will any windows os as far back as 98 maybe even 95.

<font color=green>"No Thoroughbred for you! Come back, 2 weeks."</font color=green>
April 26, 2002 8:28:25 AM

Yes, no problem.

If the thought I thought I thought had been the thought I thought, I wouldn't have thought so much.
April 26, 2002 3:04:58 PM

crash is partialy correct, but on a large campus network, you will probly get smacked if you run netbui. and if you only run netbui on your computer its not going to get on the internet. if your dorm has enough jacks, you dont need a crossover cable, just hook both laptop and pc up to their network, and you can just map to the ip address of either pc.

you shot who in the what now?
April 26, 2002 3:17:18 PM

If you live near the Montreal aera let me know , I will set you up and show you how, it's realy easy to do but hard to discribe.


The faster a computer is, the faster it will reach a crashed state :eek: 
April 26, 2002 6:09:22 PM

Quote:
Definitely. So will any windows os as far back as 98 maybe even 95.

Is that entirely true? I've heard of some people having problems accessing network drives on Win2K from Win9x and/or Linux. I haven't seen it personally because I have only set up one network in my life and that was on Win95. Heh heh. I've just heard it around the office though.

<font color=red>Bob knew he was screwed when he saw the label actually read 'Tactile Nuclear Device'.</font color=red>
a b à CPUs
April 26, 2002 10:59:59 PM

I think it's the center 4 wires, but I'm not certain, my dealer has a chart. It's as easy as putting a new end on.

What's the frequency, Kenneth?
a b à CPUs
April 26, 2002 11:28:18 PM

Well, no worry for me, my dealer makes them, but at least it explains things for people who were too curious.

What's the frequency, Kenneth?
April 26, 2002 11:29:42 PM

seeing as how you are probably going to want to have access to the school network, i would get a hub, that way you can avoid switching wires and setups, just be careful not to share your files to the entire school network... you don't want some prof browsing your pr0n

(bb || !bb) - Shakespeare
April 26, 2002 11:49:33 PM

I checked the networking book I have sitting on a shelf, but it only has the layout for 10baseT crossover. It explains 100baseTX and even gigabit though, so I wonder why they don't have diagrams for those? Oh well.

<font color=blue>If you don't buy Windows, then the terrorists have already won!</font color=blue> - Microsoft
April 27, 2002 12:59:32 AM

Doesn't 10,100 and 1000 share the same RJ45 cable,the only thing that changes is the caliber of the wires inside ?

Unless your book is telling how to reverse a coax cable...

But I may be mistaken and they all use differant cables.


The faster a computer is, the faster it will reach a crashed state :eek: 
April 27, 2002 4:03:06 AM

Windows XP doesn't have netbeui. Can I still connect a 2000 Laptop with a XP desktop using only a crossover?

<font color=blue> There's no such thing as hell, but you can make it if you try.</font color=blue>
April 27, 2002 4:14:26 AM

2 NIC cards and 1 usb hub OR switch an 2 RJ-45 cables of about 15 feet. You want CAT 5 cable or better. CAT 5/e and CAT 6 is compatible.

Most newer laptops have NIC built in. You may have to buy the NIC for your computer and a hob and the cables.



<A HREF="http://www.anandtech.com/mysystemrig.html?id=9933" target="_new"> My Rig </A>
April 27, 2002 4:44:37 AM

But MS doesn't have netbeiu in WinXP anymore. I read about some guy who tried to connect winxp and 2000, and 2k could see xp, but not vice versa.

huh. Woulda thunk deciding a major could mess up my computer choices so bad? =P

<font color=blue> There's no such thing as hell, but you can make it if you try.</font color=blue>
April 27, 2002 5:22:31 AM

forget netbui, its the devil

you shot who in the what now?
April 27, 2002 5:25:52 AM

10base is the same cable as 100base, the 10 and 100 only refers to the nic and network equipment used. the only pairs that are used in a network cable are pin 1 and 2, and pin 3 and 6. a crossover has one end normal, 1 2 3 6, the other end is 3 6 1 2. the other 4 wires change around too, but there is no need.

you shot who in the what now?
April 27, 2002 5:29:05 AM

So what else can I use (besides NETBUEI) to connect two comps using a crossover cable? TCP/IP?

Crossover cables are like 7 bucks from newegg (or less?), pretty cheap.

<font color=blue> There's no such thing as hell, but you can make it if you try.</font color=blue>
April 27, 2002 7:25:33 AM

I was being lazy, thanks for the link...

<font color=red>God</font color=red> <font color=blue>Bless</font color=blue> <font color=red>America!</font color=red>
April 27, 2002 7:38:23 AM

Quote:
10base is the same cable as 100base, the 10 and 100 only refers to the nic and network equipment used.

In addition, 10base-T only requires CAT-3 cable and terminiation (the connectors) or greater; 100base-TX requires CAT-5 cable and termination or greater.

If the thought I thought I thought had been the thought I thought, I wouldn't have thought so much.
a b à CPUs
April 27, 2002 8:01:08 AM

There are other protocols you can use, NetBoui was simply the easiest. I think IPX would do, maybe TCPIP, I'm going to leave that up to the network guys in here.

What's the frequency, Kenneth?
April 27, 2002 4:25:24 PM

there is no reason not to use tcpip any more. tcpip is used in 99% of networks anywhere. but if your just going to do peer to peer (just 2 computers and a crossover) it doesnt really matter. if you are going to a college and they have network connectivity, you will have to use tcpip. they may be cheap and only put one line in the room, in which case you will have to get a hub to have them both on the network.

you shot who in the what now?
April 28, 2002 7:33:11 AM

direct serial connect is way too slow to be of any use anymore (it would take hours to transfer even 100 megs)

<i>My life wasn't complete untill I tried sse-2 optimized pong</i>
April 28, 2002 12:29:36 PM

laplink software.


<i>if <b>you know</b> <font color=white>you don't know<font color=black>, the way could be more easy ...<font color=red>
April 28, 2002 12:35:31 PM

lab is everywhere ?!?





<i>the kill -9 alien machine is starting to reboot...
pay attention to the background daemons...</i>


<i>if <b>you know</b> <font color=white>you don't know<font color=black>, the way could be more easy ...<font color=red>
!