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Whats the best way to overclock p4 nthwoods????

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May 8, 2002 3:17:19 AM

I just wanna know if the fsb from 100 to 133 is the best way to oclock p4s with the northwood core?? And what are the recomended mobos and memory???

:cool: <font color=blue><b>BAD ASS BOYS OVERCLOCK BAD ASS TOYS</b></font color=blue> :cool:
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May 8, 2002 3:34:04 AM

Yes, upping from 100 to 133 is the prefered method, using the Abit TH7-II and Samsung RDRAM.

What's the frequency, Kenneth?
May 8, 2002 1:56:07 PM

I think it is the ONLY way to overclock a pentium, since the multiplier is locked :-(

How far can you go depends on the used memory, CPU, fsb dividers on MB, and so on, because increasing the fsb you stress all the system.

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May 8, 2002 3:53:51 PM

I think bumping the CPU to a 155 FSB with the RAM at 3/4 works the best :cool:

<font color=blue>Hi mom!</font color=blue>
May 8, 2002 6:13:23 PM

Heh heh. You would. ;) 

I can't wait to see how the early Prescotts OC. If they OC anything like the NWs, that should be a scary sight.

<pre><font color=orange><b>du hast den Sweater verkehrt an</b></font color=orange>
Oh my!</pre><p>
May 8, 2002 8:02:43 PM

You could be right, ONLY IF it doesn't hold too many improvements. I mean if they add FPU, more L1 cache, and so much more, then obviously 0.09m might ramp 25% less than it was supposed to.

--
Thunderbirds in wintertime, Northwoods in summertime! :lol: 
May 8, 2002 8:16:12 PM

Quote:
You could be right, ONLY IF it doesn't hold too many improvements. I mean if they add FPU, more L1 cache, and so much more, then obviously 0.09m might ramp 25% less than it was supposed to.

It is possible I suppose. Or it might ramp the same, but just with a larger die than a pure shrink would see. It all depends upon just what really is going into Prescott and if the added components can stand the heat. :) 

<pre><font color=orange><b>du hast den Sweater verkehrt an</b></font color=orange>
Oh my!</pre><p>
May 8, 2002 8:19:49 PM

Yeah that too is another thing... I wonder without any core changes, would continuous processes render the P4 a sub-zero aircooled chip? :wink:
Ahhh maybe bbayens was right, integrated or added optional core components in a form of cards, would be nice... you can get a Power Pack featuring an FPU, ALU, new SSE2 instructions and more, just by inserting it off-die!

--
Thunderbirds in wintertime, Northwoods in summertime! :lol: 
May 8, 2002 8:40:42 PM

Quote:
Yeah that too is another thing... I wonder without any core changes, would continuous processes render the P4 a sub-zero aircooled chip?

I could steal some equipment from work and build a sub-zero air-cooled chip (with the use of a liquid-nitrogen cooled air-stream... hey, it's still air, even if it does pass through a LN2 heat exchanger first), but unless I actually get the thing close to absolute zero, I don't think it would actually do me any good. Plus, I'd be fired and probably thrown into jail for stealing all that crap from work. So I don't think I will try it.

It does make one pause for thought though... Just how much more stuff can Intel throw onto the P4 before it becomes a furnace? And with AMD's Athlon temps where they are now, with all of the extra stuff that AMD is putting into their Hammer cores, just how hot will those suckers get? (Even with SOI, there is still a lot going on in there...)

Quote:
Ahhh maybe bbayens was right, integrated or added optional core components in a form of cards, would be nice... you can get a Power Pack featuring an FPU, ALU, new SSE2 instructions and more, just by inserting it off-die!

Hmm ... it would have to be through a card slot designed to integrate with AMD's HyperTransport or some similar notion. And it still wouldn't have the same performance as on-die. It would be cool to see though. It would give scientific application programmers (like me) the ability to expand the FPU capabilities of a system without having to resort to writing a multi-threaded application and switching to a multiple CPU hardware.

<pre><font color=orange><b>du hast den Sweater verkehrt an</b></font color=orange>
Oh my!</pre><p>
May 8, 2002 8:47:14 PM

Maybe that is what Intel's HT's goal is. By simulating more threads for FPU, it almost feels like adding a less performing FPU on die!

--
Thunderbirds in wintertime, Northwoods in summertime! :lol: 
!