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Netbook vs laptop

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August 31, 2011 8:03:43 PM

which do you think is better? why? what is the difference between the two??

More about : netbook laptop

August 31, 2011 8:52:18 PM

A netbook is basically an underpowered toy to connect to the internet. If that's all you need it's fine. A notebook is actually a real laptop that you can use for work, games, the Net, etc. and it's very portable unlike 14"-17" laptops which are heavy and bulky.
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a b D Laptop
August 31, 2011 9:37:37 PM

Hi, there's probably a million guides explaining the differences on the internet try using google.

As to which one is better? That depends on your needs and purposes that you want to use the thing for.
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August 31, 2011 11:40:30 PM

Netbooks, if you consider their intended purpose, are not underpowered toys. Most people who complain about them have tried to make them do things they weren't designed to do. I know several high school students who love them for taking notes. They will run something like Office 2003 and they will run all day on a single battery charge.

However, for most people, netbooks are a terrible choice for a primary computer.

I have a 15.6" Dell personal laptop and a little Samsung netbook. I work in Saudi Arabia and I do two or three vacation trips to the US every year. The netbook fits in my carry-on bag and gives me basic on the road computing capacity - basic web browsing and email. And when I reach any of my US destinations, I have access to full sized computers.

beenthere, "laptop" and "notebook" are interchangeable terms. The only real difference is the age of the person referring to them. Older people tend to refer to "laptops". Younger people tend to use the word "notebook". I think that is because we older folks remember the 20 - 25 pound Compaq, Osbourne, and Kaypro "lunchboxes".

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August 31, 2011 11:53:11 PM

Actually a notebook is a smaller, more portable version of a laptop as I pointed out... A 14+", 6 lb. laptop is a drag to haul around compared to a 12" notebook weighing 3.5 lbs.
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a b D Laptop
September 1, 2011 1:43:42 AM

beenthere said:
Actually a notebook is a smaller, more portable version of a laptop as I pointed out... A 14+", 6 lb. laptop is a drag to haul around compared to a 12" notebook weighing 3.5 lbs.

link me to a reputable source where this is stated. until then, all this is are your aspirations to define the different words. The consensus by IT community here that notebook = laptop, if you wish to believe otherwise that's your choice, but don't go around forcing that on other people or suggesting it as better truth.
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September 1, 2011 3:25:30 AM

AntiZig-

I'm not forcing anything on anybody. I'm just presenting FACTUAL information for the OP. As both my posts above indicate a notebook is a small form factor laptop. I don't know why you have your panties in a twist but what I posted is 100% correct. Being anti-social and confrontational does not change the facts. What I care about is helping people with accurate information - which I did. If me differentiating between notebook/ultra portables vs. full size laptops bothers you, don't read my posts. :sarcastic: 

Why do you think laptop makers have separate models designated as notebooks or ultra-portables vs. full size laptops? See Lenovo, Asus, HP, Dell and all the rest where they clearly differentiate between a notebook/ultra-portables and full size laptop based on size/weight.

If you've lugged a 14+" laptop around all day vs. a 12" notebook you'd understand the massive difference - which is why I pointed this out to the OP.
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a b D Laptop
September 2, 2011 3:01:02 AM

if it's "factual" then you should be able to back it up with a factual source, so lets have it.

as far as my opinion goes, your information is not accurate and therefore it is disinformation.

making ad hominem does not help your cause. if you are not able to handle a simple argument and view it as confrontational, perhaps you should stop here.

Laptop makers do not make the distinction you claim, marketing does. And people like you swallow it as ultimate truth and try to come up with justifications to this "fact".

oh and since you brought it up, please do show me where on the front pages of those companies are there a clear separation between those 2.

I've had a 12" laptop before, it was a desktop replacement and was about 5lbs. Regardless of that there are 15" models out there that are lighter, and personally since I've had both kinds, no I didn't notice any difference besides screen size and keyboard. But that's my personal experiences, which is not what we are discussing.
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September 2, 2011 3:54:58 AM

As I have explained but you fail to understand... A netbook, notebook and std. laptop are three distinctly different products and differentiated by their hardware, weight and size. I'll try to help you understand the obvious differences between a notebook and std. laptop - once more.

Any company that sells notebooks and laptops can confirm that what I have listed below is an accurate typical design spec for the respective product. The reason I differentiate between a notebook and laptop is so that people understand there are differences that have a signifcant impact on portabilty.

A current design notebook, aka Ultra-portable laptop, typically:

1. Is a small form factor laptop under 14" diag. screen size, usually 10"-13"

2. Weighs less than 3.5 lbs.

3. Does NOT have an optical drive

4. Uses low power CPUs because it does not have the ability to dissapate power from high current CPUs


A current std. laptop typically:

1. Has a 14"-17" diag. screen

2. Weighs in the 5.5-6 lb. range

3. Has an optical drive

4. Can be had with the fastest, most powerful CPUs

5. Can be a true workstation with the right hardware components

Just so we are clear: I don't care what you believe or don't believe. My goal is to help the OP and those who want factual info. on a given subject. You're perfectly free to not understand or accept the difference between a notebook and std. laptop as accepted by the PC industry and illustrated in their segmentation of notebooks from std. PCs in their offerings. It's a conscious choice you make to stay technically ignorant and you're completely entitled to do so. That however does not change reality.
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a b D Laptop
September 2, 2011 12:01:01 PM

beenthere said:
As I have explained but you fail to understand... A netbook, notebook and std. laptop are three distinctly different products and differentiated by their hardware, weight and size. I'll try to help you understand the obvious differences between a notebook and std. laptop - once more.

Any company that sells notebooks and laptops can confirm that what I have listed below is an accurate typical design spec for the respective product. The reason I differentiate between a notebook and laptop is so that people understand there are differences that have a signifcant impact on portabilty.

A current design notebook, aka Ultra-portable laptop, typically:

1. Is a small form factor laptop under 14" diag. screen size, usually 10"-13"

2. Weighs less than 3.5 lbs.

3. Does NOT have an optical drive

4. Uses low power CPUs because it does not have the ability to dissapate power from high current CPUs


A current std. laptop typically:

1. Has a 14"-17" diag. screen

2. Weighs in the 5.5-6 lb. range

3. Has an optical drive

4. Can be had with the fastest, most powerful CPUs

5. Can be a true workstation with the right hardware components

Just so we are clear: I don't care what you believe or don't believe. My goal is to help the OP and those who want factual info. on a given subject. You're perfectly free to not understand or accept the difference between a notebook and std. laptop as accepted by the PC industry and illustrated in their segmentation of notebooks from std. PCs in their offerings. It's a conscious choice you make to stay technically ignorant and you're completely entitled to do so. That however does not change reality.

hmm, you seem to be ignorant yourself to the point where you miss what my message was. I've read your nonsense, but all this is your word against mine. Who is to say you are more right or wrong than me? I'm asking for you to provide to source for the info that you're trying to spread stating that laptop is this and notebook is that, and so far you haven't. So, I'm gonna go with, you don't have a source and this is just your idea of what the difference between notebook and laptop is. Good deal, good luck spreading your "truth" to "inform" users.

PS> what you've just described in your last post is the difference between a NETbook and laptop. So get your wording straight :) 
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September 2, 2011 12:32:56 PM

Back to the original question....

Netbooks are cheap and great for stuff like surfing the web... they are lightweight and confrontable to put on your lap...

Laptop- is a "portable" verison of a desktop PC...

If u are just webbing, go netbook... if u want to do anything else, laptop
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September 2, 2011 2:11:03 PM

I have to agree with AntiZig and jsc, a notebook is a laptop. Any online computer shops I look at tend to have only 2 categories: either Laptops & Netbooks or Notebooks and Netbooks.

I would guess a netbook is generally any low powered portable device usually with a 10 inch screen but can be up to 13 inches. A laptop/notebook is usually a more powerful device with a screen size between 14 inches and 18 inches.

For the OP, as has already been said, and as is always the main question when you want to purchase a computer of any description... you need to know what you want to do with it. If your needs are simple, lots of travel, long battery life, minimal gaming (restricted to simple or older games) then you start looking at netbooks. They have smaller screens with lower resolutions and usually do not have a DVD drive so you would need an external USB one for the rare occasion that it's needed.

If you want lots of multitasking, to run newer or more demanding games, mainly based in one place with some travel, or to run demanding software like audio/video encoding then you need to look at laptops/notebooks. Screen size will be bigger allowing more detailed resolutions but battery life will be lower. They will also have full size keyboards which may be more comfortable for lots of typing. Some 15.6 inch and most 17 inch models will also have a separate number pad if you do lots of data entry.

If you can't make your mind up and fall somewhere in the middle, then look at a powerful netbook or a small laptop like a 14 inch or maybe 15.6 inch.

By the way, if your needs are really simple (ie. web surfing, minimal typing, some games) and extreme portability, then you can also consider a tablet!
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September 2, 2011 2:47:51 PM

Regarding the question on Laptop vs. Notebook, I was curious enough to go looking it up online. I have found a few links if you want to do some reading. They are a mixture of views, some saying there is no difference and some stating clear differences.

http://www.webopedia.com/DidYouKnow/Hardware_Software/2...
http://www.mini-laptops-and-notebooks.com/difference-be...
http://www.laptop-computer-comparison.com/difference-be...
http://wiki.answers.com/Q/What_is_the_difference_betwee...

From reading through them, my opinion is that laptop and notebook are "currently" considered to be the same thing. Originally we only had a laptop. Then the notebook was introduced which was smaller and lighter. Then the netbook arrived and it seems that things got confusing at that point. It seems that laptops and notebooks are now considered the same thing and different to netbooks. The arrival of ultraportables will surely muddy the waters even more.

In summary, there is no right or wrong answer, just what terms people now use. A laptop is pretty clear and a netbook is pretty clear but people are divided over what a notebook is. Personally I'm not entirely sure what an ultraportable is but I'm sure I'll figure it out in time :) 
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September 2, 2011 4:07:23 PM

beenthere said:
AntiZig-

I'm not forcing anything on anybody. I'm just presenting FACTUAL information for the OP. As both my posts above indicate a notebook is a small form factor laptop. I don't know why you have your panties in a twist but what I posted is 100% correct. Being anti-social and confrontational does not change the facts. What I care about is helping people with accurate information - which I did. If me differentiating between notebook/ultra portables vs. full size laptops bothers you, don't read my posts. :sarcastic: 

Why do you think laptop makers have separate models designated as notebooks or ultra-portables vs. full size laptops? See Lenovo, Asus, HP, Dell and all the rest where they clearly differentiate between a notebook/ultra-portables and full size laptop based on size/weight.

If you've lugged a 14+" laptop around all day vs. a 12" notebook you'd understand the massive difference - which is why I pointed this out to the OP.


If there is such a massive difference it shouldn't be hard to find a vendor, retailer, or manufacturer that makes this distinction.

You seem to be implying that notebook means ultra portable. There might be colloquialism that you are used to, but there is no basis/credible source of information that defines it this way. Just as often as a vendor will describe something as an ultra portable notebook, another will say ultra portable laptop. A netbook* is an ultraportable laptop without most of the features of a full featured PC notebook/laptops.

More recently ultrabook has been used to describe ultra portable laptops that fit a slim form factor and has the processing capabilities of a normal laptop.

Most companies / people use the word laptop and notebook interchangeably.
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September 2, 2011 4:09:23 PM

In essence, I think you are spreading misinformation that a notebook is essentially a netbook.
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a b D Laptop
September 2, 2011 4:33:55 PM

Kamab said:
In essence, I think you are spreading misinformation that a notebook is essentially a netbook.

my point exactly, thank you
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September 2, 2011 4:56:00 PM

Kamab said:
In essence, I think you are spreading misinformation that a notebook is essentially a netbook.


Yes, this is backwards. A netbook is a notebook. (All netbooks are notebooks but not all notebooks are netbooks.)

At one time there were some distinctions between netbook and notebook, and partially this was to conform to Microsoft's limitation as to what they would allow manufacturers to sell with WindowsXP installed on vs. new OS's like Vista and now Win7. At that time a netbook was limited in screen size and memory, and manufacturers used cheaper cpu's to save money and battery power. Netbook manufacture has moved away from some of these limitations now that they aren't selling with WinXP anymore, and the Intel Atom processor is available in a dual core version. Nevertheless netbooks came to be known as machines with screens of 12" or less, low power processors, limited ram, and no optical drive.

I wanted a netbook for a long time but couldn't justify it as a toy, then as my old fullsize laptop got older and new product lines came out, I bought a 13" "ultraportable" to replace it. My ultraportable has a 1.6GHz dual core ultra low voltage cpu, 3GB ram, 13" screen, full Windows 7, but no optical drive. It is a good size, a little bigger than a netbook and with good battery life, but still small and light. It cost more than a good netbook though.
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September 2, 2011 5:25:45 PM

Netbooks are not Notebooks to PC manufacturers and sellers. Netbooks are under-powered toys. You can't play games or run real apps with them. They are primarily intended to connect to the internet. Notebooks are a small form factor sub-category of std. laptops. If you check ANY major PC supplier they have three distinct categories because these are three different products. A notebook and laptop are differentiated by the characteristics listed in my post above.

Netbook

Notebook/Ultra portable

Laptop
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a b D Laptop
September 2, 2011 6:56:11 PM

beenthere said:
Netbooks are not Notebooks to PC manufacturers and sellers. Netbooks are under-powered toys. You can't play games or run real apps with them. They are primarily intended to connect to the internet. Notebooks are a small form factor sub-category of std. laptops. If you check ANY major PC supplier they have three distinct categories because these are three different products. A notebook and laptop are differentiated by the characteristics listed in my post above.

Netbook

Notebook/Ultra portable

Laptop

for the third effing time, SOURCE PLEASE
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September 2, 2011 8:48:12 PM

beenthere said:
As I have explained but you fail to understand... A netbook, notebook and std. laptop are three distinctly different products and differentiated by their hardware, weight and size. I'll try to help you understand the obvious differences between a notebook and std. laptop - once more.

Any company that sells notebooks and laptops can confirm that what I have listed below is an accurate typical design spec for the respective product. The reason I differentiate between a notebook and laptop is so that people understand there are differences that have a signifcant impact on portabilty.

A current design notebook, aka Ultra-portable laptop, typically:

1. Is a small form factor laptop under 14" diag. screen size, usually 10"-13"

2. Weighs less than 3.5 lbs.

3. Does NOT have an optical drive

4. Uses low power CPUs because it does not have the ability to dissapate power from high current CPUs


A current std. laptop typically:

1. Has a 14"-17" diag. screen

2. Weighs in the 5.5-6 lb. range

3. Has an optical drive

4. Can be had with the fastest, most powerful CPUs

5. Can be a true workstation with the right hardware components

Just so we are clear: I don't care what you believe or don't believe. My goal is to help the OP and those who want factual info. on a given subject. You're perfectly free to not understand or accept the difference between a notebook and std. laptop as accepted by the PC industry and illustrated in their segmentation of notebooks from std. PCs in their offerings. It's a conscious choice you make to stay technically ignorant and you're completely entitled to do so. That however does not change reality.

One can distinguish between a laptop and ultra portable laptop and netbook, but that does not mean that ultra portable is the same as notebook. Here is a notebook that does not fit your description : http://www.google.com/products/catalog?q=notebook+compu... . It clearly fits your description of a standard laptop not your description of a notebook. It might be that when the term notebook was originally introduced it was intended to describe a smaller form factor (the size of an actual notebook). However, language changes over time. In current usage the terms laptop and notebook are interchangeable. Go to any website and search for notebooks and you will get a list of links to laptops. Insisting on a distinction that the rest of the world no longer recognizes just seems silly.
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a c 434 D Laptop
February 6, 2012 5:41:50 PM

In a way ultrabooks will help bridge the gap between a netbook and a laptop. Many are 3lbs or less. I believe the 13" Samung 9 series is one of the lightest at around 2.4lbs - 2.5lbs. Therefore, ultrabooks are very portable.

Ultrabooks also use ULV (ultra low voltage) mobile Intel Core i3/i5/i7 CPUs. AMD is not in the picture yet, but they will enter when Trinity is released. Therefore, ultrabooks will have the CPU processing power that's equivalent to a laptop.

However, the price of ultrabooks are higher than many mainstream laptops; starting at about $1,000. Making things small, light and powerful is not cheap. Also, to be classified as an ultrabook, it must have a SSD drive instead of the typical HDD drive which increases the price (and decrease storage space). Additionally, for people who want to play games will have to rely on the Intel HD 3000 graphics core. Dedicated graphic cards takes up space and eats up power.
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a c 434 D Laptop
February 6, 2012 5:45:22 PM

Manufacturers wants to move away from netbooks because they really don't make much money from them. The margins they can get from ultrabooks will be much better. Of course, not everyone would be willing to swallow the price difference between a netbook and an ultrabook, but at least it is another option for consumers.
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