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Got a Volcano 7+ and toasted my XP1700+

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Anonymous
a b à CPUs
May 26, 2002 4:31:38 AM

Ok here is my story,

I had an XP1700+ running with a JMC cooler for about 3 months. It was running alittle warm 52-54C under load. So I decided to upgrade to the Volcano 7+. When I removed the JMC I noticed that the thermal pad from the heatsink had melted all over the cpu(I assume its supposed to do this?). So I tried to remove as much of it as I could using rubbing alcohol, cpu core was clean but the pink melted pad was still all around the oudside of the core. I then applied some silver3(as per instructions on thier web page) and put the 7+ on. Fired the computer up and I hear a not-so-good noise. I take the 7+ off and the bottom of my cpu is now black. Any idea's what could have caused this?

Thanks

More about : volcano toasted xp1700

May 26, 2002 4:50:03 AM

you didn't apply the heatsink right so there was no heat transfer. All the heat from the cpu built up and got fried. at least thats what i think could have happenend. there are millions of things that could have happenend.

Sorry my friend but you could be a victom of a burnt processor.

I'm not a big fan for thermaltake (there is a reason why "take" is in there name). i recommend globalwin.

<A HREF="http://www.anandtech.com/mysystemrig.html?id=9933" target="_new"> My Rig </A>
Anonymous
a b à CPUs
May 26, 2002 5:02:16 AM

I don't think it could be because of heat build up because the computer never even posted. It fried as soon as I turned it on. My epox mobo posted FF on the debugging LED screen, which usually means CPU. So it never had a chance to even build up heat.
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Anonymous
a b à CPUs
May 26, 2002 6:37:02 AM

If it didnt even post, then I think it has nothing to do with the cooler. Maybe you messed it up while cleaning the melted stuff off the cpu.
May 26, 2002 9:34:23 AM

Yes, maybe using rubbing alcohol then putting the silver on messed it up.

Maybe there was some sort of conduction when you turned the power on and the electricity went to your processor (especially if it was still damp from the alcohol or silver).

I'm sorry for your loss. Maybe you should ask the maker of your heatsink/cooling fan to replace your processor (because you did what they advised). Just don't mention you used alcohol before hand :-)
May 26, 2002 12:31:11 PM

Quote:

I'm not a big fan for thermaltake (there is a reason why "take" is in there name). i recommend globalwin.

There's nothing wrong with thermaltake, their Volcano 7 series of HSFs are top-notch. You just have to be careful when installing any HSF.

:wink: <b><i>"A penny saved is a penny earned!"</i></b> :wink:
May 26, 2002 3:02:49 PM

na, i had the dragon orb 3 and the fan died in 30 seconds. No, thermaltake is crap as far as i'm concerned. i'll never buy their products again thats for sure. Even the new northbridge fan i bought for replacement is a globalwin. Their products are rock solid.

<A HREF="http://www.anandtech.com/mysystemrig.html?id=9933" target="_new"> My Rig </A>
May 26, 2002 3:06:45 PM

Orbs suck, but Thermaltake rocks, IMO! :smile:

You haven't seen the Volcano 7 series! I have a V7 in my PC right now!

:wink: <b><i>"A penny saved is a penny earned!"</i></b> :wink:
May 26, 2002 5:36:35 PM

i've seen them. my friend has one. But my globalwin performs better then his does and i paid 10 bucks less for it. On cool days it never goes past 41 and even gets as low as 32. On 80 degree weather it did reach 48 i think. I'm sure if i were to check it now it would be at 34 or around that on a athlon xp 1600+. He had the same board and cpu. we basicly have the same computer. but he has a different videocard and better monitor. lol! but his is always 40 and beyond. like even 58 i think he once asked me if that was bad, but i told him if it doesn't lockup it doesn't matter.

so ya ... globalwin is by far better. in my opinion of course. ... i like the fact you can screw off the fan and put on a different fan if you want. i can pop on a 80MM fan with a 60-80 converter and it would work. The global win also has a 4pin conncector and a 3pin to monitor the RPMS which i think is cool.

ok i'm done advertising now lol.

<A HREF="http://www.anandtech.com/mysystemrig.html?id=9933" target="_new"> My Rig </A>
May 26, 2002 7:45:21 PM

Add a spark to rubbing alcohol and you get a small explosion b/c the vapors will light. This is probably what happened. Ive seen this done before, not in a PC. Should have waited for the stuff to COMPLETLY evaporated and dried up.

JF
May 26, 2002 7:57:52 PM

ahh yes very good .... that makes sense .. your suppose to wait a half hour at most before poping the chip back in and fireing it up ... i tend to use compressed air can to evaporate the alchohol.

<A HREF="http://www.anandtech.com/mysystemrig.html?id=9933" target="_new"> My Rig </A>
May 26, 2002 8:12:12 PM

I cleaned my cpu & cooler with lighter fluid, removes everything in one shot. evaporated in seconds, have 70% rubbing alcohol too, but never compared the two. now what's my point? LOL

<font color=red>Got a silent setup, now I can hear myself thinking. hmm still silence</font color=red>
Anonymous
a b à CPUs
May 26, 2002 8:31:03 PM

I used 99% pure isopropyl alcohol (what arctic silver suggests to use). I didn't wait 30 mintues, but I did wait a good 10 or so. That should be enough time for 99%. even if there was some vapor left the cpu should not spark.

How thick of a coating of AS3 should be applied? I had a pretty thin coat on it. I couldn't see the cpu anymore. Some people say it should be so light that you can see the lettering on the cpu still.

What do you guys do?
May 26, 2002 9:15:50 PM

You put the hsf on backwards.


Thats the only way the chip would have fried, if the cpu was not in contact, and it would not have posted if it had.

Did you use a shim? If so it may have prevented contact, one things for certain, it wasnt alchohol fire lol.

:wink: The Cash Left In My Pocket,The BEST Benchmark :wink:
May 26, 2002 9:25:19 PM

just a simple spark to light rubbing alcohol? lol, several years ago me and some freinds took an old tv to the river late night equiped with a role of toilet paper, some rubbing alcohol, and a crow bar, you can guess why we were there! we had smashed the tv as much as it would go then we were going to light it on fire with the alcohol and toilet paper, we couldnt get that stuff to light no matter what we tried! it finaly lit but i think that was just the paper burning after the alcohol had evaporated!

how do you shoot the devil in the back? what happens if you miss? -verbal
Anonymous
a b à CPUs
May 26, 2002 9:31:51 PM

backwards? I think thats almost impossible.

Anyways i'm picking up a new 2000+ today and going to try it again. Wish me luck.
May 26, 2002 9:55:32 PM

I cleaned a coffee grinder out once w/ rubbing alchol b/c I was hoping that it would evaporate quickly. Needless to say it DID ignite and ruined the coffee grinder.
May 26, 2002 10:39:45 PM

perhaps the spark created was hotter than a lighter?

how do you shoot the devil in the back? what happens if you miss? -verbal
Anonymous
a b à CPUs
May 26, 2002 11:52:46 PM

Just put a new cpu in and it booted fine this time.

Everything is working fine now. Thanks for your replies guys.

Running at 35C on idle( woot! ) which is awesome..especially when my room is boiling hot like right now.
May 27, 2002 12:50:48 AM

i was thinking you maybe u didnt remove enuf of that thermal good from the first HSF... but it doesnt matter now.

just one question... idel temps??? whats this idle temps foolishness????
hmf... i dont care about idle... for my cpu there is no idle. full load or turned off!
:lol: 

:lol:  Whats better, <font color=blue>Intel</font color=blue> or <font color=green>AMD?</font color=green> :lol: 
May 27, 2002 1:03:12 AM

Great point. What's the point of having your comp on if your doing nothing? It only really matters how hot it is at it's peak temp.

My firewall tastes like burning. :eek: 
May 27, 2002 1:34:02 AM

precisely... idle temps really mean jack, expecially when overclocking.

whats the point of a nice cool 30C idle if it locks up or overheats under load???

besides, i run cure for cancer all the time. so even when im not doing much with the computer, the cpu is running full speed.



:lol:  Whats better, <font color=blue>Intel</font color=blue> or <font color=green>AMD?</font color=green> :lol: 
May 27, 2002 3:23:20 AM

Quote:
I had an XP1700+ running with a JMC cooler for about 3 months. It was running alittle warm 52-54C under load. So I decided to upgrade to the Volcano 7+. When I removed the JMC I noticed that the thermal pad from the heatsink had melted all over the cpu(I assume its supposed to do this?). So I tried to remove as much of it as I could using rubbing alcohol, cpu core was clean but the pink melted pad was still all around the oudside of the core. I then applied some silver3(as per instructions on thier web page) and put the 7+ on. Fired the computer up and I hear a not-so-good noise. I take the 7+ off and the bottom of my cpu is now black. Any idea's what could have caused this?

bear in mind the Advance Micro Devices Athlon cpu's are fragile and will crumble when handled, eventually it will fry. this info is not in any AMDfan website and is only whispered on these boards. make sure you get your RMA# from AMD or from where you purchased it, also do read retailers return policies because AMD burnage rate is totally new profit loss, probably 2nd to cc fraud.

"<b>AMD/VIA!</b>...you are <i>still</i> the weakest link, good bye!"
May 27, 2002 4:53:27 AM

Quote:
bear in mind the Advance Micro Devices Athlon cpu's are fragile and will crumble when handled,


Hmmm... I imagine that anything will crumble when some moron applies enough force.

Quote:
eventually it will fry.


FUD! I know of K6-2s that have been running non stop for more than a year(not being shut off at all), under medium to heavy loads and not one in a hundred have yet to fry. All Athlon chips will fry? Methinks Melty should get his diploma from elementary school before he tries to explain things.

Quote:
make sure you get your RMA# from AMD or from where you purchased it, also do read retailers return policies because AMD burnage rate is totally new profit loss, probably 2nd to cc fraud.


Get the RMA, yes. That is the only sensible thing you have yet to say. Burnage rate can only reflect the stupidity of a user. For example, if you used a P4 without the clip, just as many P4's would burn, crash, or what have you. Incompetence is the problem, not the chips. Credit card companies are among the most profitable businesses worldwide, though I doubt your overtaxed brain intended to say something about profit. Credit Card companies don't lose much money to fraud. They get paid by the insane fines for such fraud, and some even post profits from this form of revenue(Wondering how I know this stuff? My step-sister's husband is a high level manager at a credit company!)

<font color=black>Need Money!! Accepting Donations to help better my future. Thanks!</font color=black>
May 27, 2002 6:48:02 AM

No, in 99% of cases it is certainly possible, if not easy. Most heasinks come with a clip at each end. if you note, the pivot point of those clips is not central but towards one edge. Also, the heatsink frequently will have a shoulder milled into it.

in such scenarios, the shoulder should be over the hinge end of the socket, and the pivot should be nearer the other end. If you look down at the CPU in the socket, the silver/black die (core) is offset in the socket, away from the hinge. The pivot of the clip (if such a clip is used) must be directly over the core else uneven pressure will be applied and the chip will very likely overheat and/or die.

As such many heatsinks _can_ be installed backwards.

-* <font color=red> !! S O L D !! </font color=red> *-
To the gentleman in the pink Tutu
May 27, 2002 12:36:30 PM

"For example, if you used a P4 without the clip, just as many P4's would burn, crash, or what have you"

Crash yes, burn no. But at crash time you know you have a problem, you then begin to rectify it.....that was documented right here at tomshardware.com. AMD not implementing a fool proof heat protection device, or at least requiring Mobo makers to support the half assed one they have now, is ridiculous.....AMD should address the problem and fix it. Even if its because of ignorant consumers....the corrective measure there would be to use something fool proof.

I sold my sig for $50.
May 27, 2002 12:41:26 PM

Quote:
Crash yes, burn no. But at crash time you know you have a problem, you then begin to rectify it.....that was documented right here at tomshardware.com. AMD not implementing a fool proof heat protection device, or at least requiring Mobo makers to support the half assed one they have now, is ridiculous.....AMD should address the problem and fix it. Even if its because of ignorant consumers....the corrective measure there would be to use something fool proof.


Amd solution is hardly half assed, the motherboard makers cant be forced to follow amds specifications, when they do the thermal protection works perfectly, it is CLEARLY the mobo makers fault not amd.

Amd cannot snap its fingers and tell mobo makers what do to, many mobo makers dont care enough about the consumers investment to warrant an extra 2 bucks for the thermal control circutry, however there are motherboards which do have it, its OUR job as the consumers to reward those motherboard makers with our buisness. If we dont make them know we want the feature they will never implement it.

:wink: The Cash Left In My Pocket,The BEST Benchmark :wink:
May 27, 2002 4:52:34 PM

Quote:
Amd solution is hardly half assed, the motherboard makers cant be forced to follow amds specifications, when they do the thermal protection works perfectly, it is CLEARLY the mobo makers fault not amd.

A = Amd's thermal diode = ½ thermal protection solution
B = Motherboard Manufacturer part = ½ thermal monitor

a + b = 1 thus AMD has half-assed thermal protection.

"<b>AMD/VIA!</b>...you are <i>still</i> the weakest link, good bye!"
May 27, 2002 5:52:37 PM

quote:

How thick of a coating of AS3 should be applied? I had a pretty thin coat on it. I couldn't see the cpu anymore. Some people say it should be so light that you can see the lettering on the cpu still.

=======================================================

you said the pad was still intact around the cpu itself, that = bad

first there are a few basic concepts of cooling:

heat is only going to be removed as fast as the slowest moving (heat transfer) taking place. there are 3 main areas of heat transfer on air cooling setups. some are more important than others. also, we can control some areas more effectively.

1)transfer of heat to heatsink (most critical) since heat has to jump the gap between surface of cpu and heatsink (this is where silver grease comes in to play) since silver is a metal, it suspends tiny particles of highly (heat) conductive silver in that space, increasing the heat transfer from less conductive silicone.

2) size (surface area) and material of heatsink. copper is more conductive than aluminum, silver is higher than both of these metals.... there is a chart that shows the heat conductivity of metals. here are some examples:

Metal
Thermal Conductivity, k (in unit of W/m·K)

Aluminum
205.0

Brass
109.0

Copper
385.0

Lead
34.7

Mercury
8.3

Silver
406.0

Steel
50.2

furthemore, the surface area: more = good, thats why we use fins to increase the surface area of the heatsink.

3) transfer of heat from heatsink to air (radiation) to increase this transfer we use fans, fans are measured in cfpm (cubic feet per min.) faster = good increasing the amount of cool air ran over the fins increases the overall heat transfer.

with this said,
anything surrounding the cpu is going to insulate it (increasing instead of decreasing heat), putting excessive amounts of grease is going to squeeze around the edges of the cpu and insulate it further.

when using a new hsf this is what i do. first i get a razor and remove any of that worthless silicon they apply to the heatsink (silver grease is worthless without doing this, because the silicon becomes the heat bottleneck)

after this, i get some 300, 600 and 1500 grit wet sandpaper (emory cloth) i find a very flat object ( 1/4 in. glass is excellent)and successively lap my heatsink to a fine finish, this will take some time (20-30min of work). when finished, my heatsink is so flat and smooth the metal is acually glossy and mirror like, this makes an excellent contact surface.

last, i place the most tiny bit of silver grease possible on the cpu (about the same mass as 1/2 of a bb (yes, from a bb gun) or LESS.. remember, only place a tiny bit of grease in the center of the chip, DO NOT SPREAD IT OUT!!!! less = good just remember the contact area in there is less than .001 inch so you dont need alot. even this tiny bit will tend to squirt out excessive grease....




athlon1gh@1.4gh avia
asus a7v133 w/raid
gforce3 ti 500@255core/570memory<P ID="edit"><FONT SIZE=-1><EM>Edited by franksterrr on 05/27/02 09:59 AM.</EM></FONT></P>
May 27, 2002 9:48:49 PM

I read somewhere that some Mobos that have it installed still dont save Procs........Mat, if you cant force the mobo makers to put it in there, do it yourself, on chip.....Maybe its AMD that doesnt care about the consumers considering all the horror stories about chipped cores, and burnt sockets......What about a heat spreader? whats that cost to put on? Instead they throw a thermometer on their proc and call it "thermal protection".

I sold my sig for $50.
May 27, 2002 10:26:20 PM

Quote:
I read somewhere that some Mobos that have it installed still dont save Procs........


You read wrong, a mobo with thermal protection designed to amds spec will save your proc even in hsf removal.


Quote:
Mat, if you cant force the mobo makers to put it in there, do it yourself, on chip


Amds solution works, there are motherboards which use the feature, amd dosent need to redesign its chips(and it probably would need a new socket to do it imo) just to prevent the minority of users from frying their chips.


Heatspreaders sometimes increase temps, they dont prevent burnups, chipped cores happened to all open die cpus, not just amds.

All of the horror stories you mentioned were caused by user error with non approved hsfs, the fact of the matter is if you use the amd stock hsf you will not chip your core or burn up, and if you use a different hsf your warranty is void anyways.

SO while its true amd dosent have on die thermal protection like the p4 the thermal protection it does have works fine, if you the consumer buy a mobo which supports it.

You act as if amd is at fault for not being able to control the mobo makers, but that is a short sighted fault.

:wink: The Cash Left In My Pocket,The BEST Benchmark :wink:
May 27, 2002 11:51:21 PM

"All of the horror stories you mentioned were caused by user error with non approved hsfs, the fact of the matter is if you use the amd stock hsf you will not chip your core or burn up, and if you use a different hsf your warranty is void anyways."
Great point.
Although you're missing my point entirely. Im saying that AMD shouldnt leave those decisions in the hands of the consumer, or up to Mobo makers. Slapping on a more advanced Therm prot. now is too late, but I hope the hammer has one in place. Its harder to chip a core w/ a heatspreader on it. Im pretty sure theres no other reason for it other than to save the proc from getting banged up. You can't think everyone knows what theyre doing....You're counter-arguement cant be "Its the users fault", because we established that already. Now to solve the problem....Which is the lack of support from Mobos, and fidgity, uninformed, clumsy people. Do you A)Come up w/ a way to get Mobo's to support your Prot.? or B) Take it out of the Mobo manufacturers hands and do it your damn self?
As for the buyer do you A)Put a fold out poster in your Processor boxes to help them do things right and pray they do? or B)throw a heatspreader on the proc.?

I sold my sig for $50.
May 28, 2002 12:40:28 AM

THG had, and AMD also, a video showing LIVE how they used different situations to test the new protection. Things involving:
-Running Q3 at max load, disconnecting fan.
-Removing HSF entirely whilst playing.

I can't remember if there were others, but all I can say, is that not only when they disconnected the fan, but it stayed safe for 12 entire minutes while they are playing, until it overheated, where the protection automatically occured.

There is this, and there is also the remote feature used by most mobo makers. I am speaking of the off-die thermal sensor. My Epox 8KHA+'s sensor automatically detected the tested warning temp of 53º, and automatically did the alarm. To me it's enough proof that as soon as it reaches high temps, it reacts. I set it to shut off at 60º with a warning of 56º, which IMO is fine to me. I know AMD's current CPUs threshold is average 90ºC, but I am very cautious to my precious hardware. Meltdown is a dick for not even seeing the truth, he can't even admit the thermal solution, even with the new video, works perfectly according to the tests. He lives in Bizzaro world where anything happens...

In conclusion, to me AMD's current idea IMO is slightly better than Intel's solely because you CAN know there was a problem in the heat spreading. Not to mention you can also use the mobo temp warn feature too, so now you have a full house warning+protection. If P4s had the damn bell or alarm, I'd agree it has the best protection methods. But even Intel's solution isn't foolproof, as you may have seen in LHGPoobaa's burnout topic.

--
I can't beleive Dungeon Siege has a pitchfork weapon called "Hoe"! :lol:  <P ID="edit"><FONT SIZE=-1><EM>Edited by Eden on 05/27/02 08:42 PM.</EM></FONT></P>
May 28, 2002 12:43:19 AM

Led the only thing that on board thermal protection prevents is violent hsf removal death(which amds specced solution prevents against), thermal death is not a major issue when you follow the directions.

AMd should not be in the buisness of preventing idiots from frying their cpus, im sorry.

:wink: The Cash Left In My Pocket,The BEST Benchmark :wink:
May 28, 2002 12:51:30 AM

You're arguing that AMD has good thermal protection when in fact it's the motherboard that is protecting the CPU. All the Proc is doing is telling the mobo what the temp is......

I sold my sig for $50.
May 28, 2002 12:53:42 AM

I dunno but I think mobo makers can modify the way it functions.
Maybe some will use the LEDs which will light up on overheat then shut off, maybe differently. But nevertheless it's AMD who came up with the blueprints. They merely suggested the mobo makers, and some like good ol' Asus, followed. Not to mention the A7V333's price is very very generous, even with this new feature.

--
I can't beleive Dungeon Siege has a pitchfork weapon called "Hoe"! :lol: 
May 28, 2002 12:56:57 AM

You're absolutely right, no one pulls the heatsink off for no reason other than to see the proc fry.......I havent seen this AMD released video, maybe I should check it out. I would like to see what happens to an XP w/ a dead fan on it.......

I sold my sig for $50.
May 28, 2002 2:01:49 AM

I doubt it was all non-approved HSFs involved in those horror stories. Do you know all these people personally? Even with an approved HSF, things go wrong.

BTW, can you fire off some MB manufacturers that implement the thermal protection? I'm building a pc for my cousin and wouldn't mind considering them.
May 28, 2002 9:36:45 AM

Led, the motherboard chip is part of an amd designed protection system, if amd hadnt designed it it would not work at all, your argument is flawwed.


The motherboard makers not including the chip is just as negligent on their part as if they had specced the sockets voltage to run @3volts as opposed to 1.75, the motherboard makers are not implimenting their part of the amd thermal protection.

Buy only motherboards which have amd approved and specced thermal control circutry, if you do not it is your own fault if the chip fries.

:wink: The Cash Left In My Pocket,The BEST Benchmark :wink:
May 28, 2002 9:38:15 AM

Quote:
I doubt it was all non-approved HSFs involved in those horror stories. Do you know all these people personally? Even with an approved HSF, things go wrong.

BTW, can you fire off some MB manufacturers that implement the thermal protection? I'm building a pc for my cousin and wouldn't mind considering them.


If you use the stock hsf and the chip fries it is covered by warranty, you get an rma.

Check amd.com for a list of protected motherboards, there arent many because there is no demand for thermal protection, that is the consumers fault.

:wink: The Cash Left In My Pocket,The BEST Benchmark :wink:
May 28, 2002 11:01:49 AM

I saw a schematic of the "thermal protection circuit". I wasnt impressed. I could do the same thing w/ a switching relay breaking contacts from the PSUs hot leg, and a digital thermometer w/ a built in alarm.....Throwing a thermometer on a chip, and drawing up a rudimentary circuit (which is basically an on/off switch) doesnt, imo, qualify as "good thermal protection". But you're still missing my point entirely. Im arguing that theres room for improvent to prevent stupid things from happening, and you're saying basically theres none. AMD is using the worlds greatest solution for heat protection? That's just ridiculous if you see that theres no problems or room for improvement in that dept. Even if there was just 1000 accounts of burnt procs. You should think "hmmm, something should be done about that", not "well theyre all stupid people!". Why pass the buck off to the Mobo manus? On another note.....you really do argue hard for AMD, without ever accepting flaw in their processors.

I sold my sig for $50.
May 28, 2002 11:59:15 AM

Whether it's impressing you or not, it's made to be simple. Go over the temp, BZZT, turn off. That is all.

--
I can't beleive Dungeon Siege has a pitchfork weapon called "Hoe"! :lol: 
May 28, 2002 1:44:37 PM

You're forgetting that the majority of cases of fried CPUs came BEFORE AMD introduced the thermal protection spec - so they HAVE done something about it.

And if something is simple, then it's less likely to go wrong, surely. Simple=more reliable IMO.

And it WORKS. so insofar as 'The worlds best thermal protection' goes, it does the job, so what could be better? Your PC gets slower? That doesn't sound like 'better' to me... :smile:

<font color=blue><i>Your</i> PC may be quieter, but <i>my</i> PC makes a better hairdryer!</font color=blue>
May 28, 2002 1:45:30 PM

Quote:
Check amd.com for a list of protected motherboards, there arent many because there is no demand for thermal protection, that is the consumers fault.

Matisaro, what in the hell are you smoking? (And where can I get some? :wink: ) Motherboard manufacturers not only produce very few motherbaords with thermal protection, but hardly even advertise the ones that have it as actually being special in any way for having thermal protection. Consumers barely even know that it exists, and even those who do know still have to go to AMD's web site just to hunt down the extremely rare motherboards that actually do have it.

And you blame the <b>consumers</b>?

Matisaro, try listening to yourself for a moment.

This isn't a problem of supply and demand. This is a problem caused by a <i>lack</i> of communication and advertisement on the part of both AMD and motherboard manufacturers. They have made it about as difficult for a consumer as humanly possible. Hell, motherboards with the <i>proper</i> thermal protection weren't even available when the first AMD chips with the on-die thermal sensor came out. Comsumers couldn't have bought them then even if they knew about the thermal protection. If a consumer wanted thermal protection, they had to due with a half-arsed sensor-on-motherboard solution that <i>hopefully</i> worked correctly. Only now are we finally seeing motherboards with a proper implementation, and even those are rare and almost completely unadvertised for their thermal protection.

And <b>you</b> want to go blaming the consumers?


Tech support said take a screen shot.
Putting it down with my .22 was the humane thing to do.
May 28, 2002 2:01:58 PM

Quote:
And it WORKS. so insofar as 'The worlds best thermal protection' goes, it does the job, so what could be better? Your PC gets slower? That doesn't sound like 'better' to me...

Explain that to an college student who has just spent five hours typing up their summer-course theology paper over in a hot and sticky computer lab, only to have the computer finally and suddenly shut off without warning because whoever set up the thermal protection that 'does the job' in a less-than-friendly manner.

Oh sure, the thermal protection worked. The CPU was saved.

Whoopie!

I'm sorry, but 'does the job' is not good enough for everyone.

Maybe throttling the CPU does not sound better to you. Maybe for you it is not better. But there is a whole world out there full of people, and a <i>lot</i> of them would disagree with you.

I'm not saying that you're wrong because for you, you're right. I'm saying that there is a world of people out there who will disagree with you, and they're just as right as you are.


Tech support said take a screen shot.
Putting it down with my .22 was the humane thing to do.
May 28, 2002 2:06:22 PM

Quote:
This isn't a problem of supply and demand. This is a problem caused by a lack of communication and advertisement on the part of both AMD and motherboard manufacturers.

That is quite a good point. If AMD were a bit more vocal with advertising the thermal protection feature, then users would <i>demand</i> the thermal protection. I can only guess that AMD were a little embarassed about the whole thing, and are trying to get it implemented quietly.

<font color=blue><i>Your</i> PC may be quieter, but <i>my</i> PC makes a better hairdryer!</font color=blue>
May 28, 2002 2:10:19 PM

Call me crazy, but this smells like a perfect opportunity for an aftermarket solution. I can't believe some cooling company hasn't come up with a simple kill switch you could install in case your choice of mobo doesn't have it already.

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A newbie is only a newbie for as long as you allow him to be.
-Anonymous Veteran
May 28, 2002 2:18:39 PM

Quote:
Explain that to an college student who has just spent five hours typing up their summer-course theology paper over in a hot and sticky computer lab, only to have the computer finally and suddenly shut off without warning because whoever set up the thermal protection that 'does the job' in a less-than-friendly manner.

This is true I guess, but if they were using MS WORD it would have crashed <i>long</i> before that 5 hours was up! :lol:  - in my experience anyway. And they would at least then learn to save regularly. (I long ago learned that lesson :smile: )

But I guess I do stand corrected on that one.

<font color=blue><i>Your</i> PC may be quieter, but <i>my</i> PC makes a better hairdryer!</font color=blue>
May 28, 2002 4:00:19 PM

I bought AC3 and a Volcano 7+ last weekend, but before I put the 7+ on I wanted to see how much AC3 alone could cool my stock HSF on my XP 2000. With stock HSF and stock thermalpad I was running 48c idle and 59c load (I know, kinda HOT). I took out the CPU, cleaned it with acetone and scraped the center of the CPU to get that crap off. I put AC3 on (half a grain of rice's worth), spread it out, and put HSF back on. With that my temps are 56c idle and 70c under load! (no lockups though). I'm going to use the 7+ anyway but since I know I put the HSF on correctly, I'm guessing the reason is I didn't remove enough of the original thermal pad from the bottom of the HS, and I'm not transferring enough heat. I won't boot the PC again, but does that sound right and if so how do you get that stuff off (without sand paper) in case I ever need it? Thanks.

Life's a hole...dig it. - Joe Dirt
May 28, 2002 8:24:20 PM

Don't compare it to Intels solution, because thats not what Im doing....

I sold my sig for $50.
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