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Replacing Dimension 8200 PSU - advice please

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November 1, 2004 5:46:40 PM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

I'm going to replace the 250W PSU in my Dimension 8200 (2.0Ghz - built
January 2001 UK) with a 400W.

I've googled on this and found a number of worrying reports that due to
non-ATX compliance that a standard ATX PSU could fry the mobo.

Anyone got a definitve answer as to whether the Dimension 8200 takes a
standard PSU?
Anonymous
November 1, 2004 5:46:41 PM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

Pinout found here;
http://support.dell.com/support/edocs/systems/dim8200/t...
This is standard ATX.

"777" <777@anemail.address> wrote in message
news:cm5i8g$8md$1@sparta.btinternet.com...
> I'm going to replace the 250W PSU in my Dimension 8200 (2.0Ghz - built
> January 2001 UK) with a 400W.
>
> I've googled on this and found a number of worrying reports that due
> to non-ATX compliance that a standard ATX PSU could fry the mobo.
>
> Anyone got a definitve answer as to whether the Dimension 8200 takes a
> standard PSU?
>
Anonymous
November 1, 2004 6:22:19 PM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

It's a proprietary PSU, however, replacements are available. (Search the
Internet.) You'll pay more than you would for a 'standard' PSU.

Having said that, Dell PSUs are known for being conservatively rated. What
could you possibly need 400W for?
--
Ted Zieglar


"777" <777@anemail.address> wrote in message
news:cm5i8g$8md$1@sparta.btinternet.com...
> I'm going to replace the 250W PSU in my Dimension 8200 (2.0Ghz - built
> January 2001 UK) with a 400W.
>
> I've googled on this and found a number of worrying reports that due to
> non-ATX compliance that a standard ATX PSU could fry the mobo.
>
> Anyone got a definitve answer as to whether the Dimension 8200 takes a
> standard PSU?
>
>
Related resources
Anonymous
November 1, 2004 7:21:52 PM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

Standard ATX with additional 12v connector as required by P4 motherboards.

.... Ben Myers

On Mon, 1 Nov 2004 10:44:35 -0500, "Pen" <nospam@nospam.com> wrote:

>Pinout found here;
>http://support.dell.com/support/edocs/systems/dim8200/t...
>This is standard ATX.
>
>"777" <777@anemail.address> wrote in message
>news:cm5i8g$8md$1@sparta.btinternet.com...
>> I'm going to replace the 250W PSU in my Dimension 8200 (2.0Ghz - built
>> January 2001 UK) with a 400W.
>>
>> I've googled on this and found a number of worrying reports that due
>> to non-ATX compliance that a standard ATX PSU could fry the mobo.
>>
>> Anyone got a definitve answer as to whether the Dimension 8200 takes a
>> standard PSU?
>>
>
November 1, 2004 7:36:19 PM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

"Pen" <nospam@nospam.com> wrote in message
news:gdudnY4_crloxBvcRVn-jg@adelphia.com...
> Pinout found here;
> http://support.dell.com/support/edocs/systems/dim8200/t...
> This is standard ATX.
>

Excellent, thank you.

I searched on Dell's site (UK) but couldn't find this anywhere.
Anonymous
November 1, 2004 7:36:20 PM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

You're welcome.

"777" <777@anemail.address> wrote in message
news:cm5om2$ejl$1@titan.btinternet.com...
>
> "Pen" <nospam@nospam.com> wrote in message
> news:gdudnY4_crloxBvcRVn-jg@adelphia.com...
>> Pinout found here;
>> http://support.dell.com/support/edocs/systems/dim8200/t...
>> This is standard ATX.
>>
>
> Excellent, thank you.
>
> I searched on Dell's site (UK) but couldn't find this anywhere.
>
Anonymous
November 1, 2004 7:36:20 PM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

"777" <777@anemail.address> wrote in message
news:cm5om2$ejl$1@titan.btinternet.com...
>
> "Pen" <nospam@nospam.com> wrote in message
> news:gdudnY4_crloxBvcRVn-jg@adelphia.com...
>> Pinout found here;
>> http://support.dell.com/support/edocs/systems/dim8200/t...
>> This is standard ATX.
>>
>
> Excellent, thank you.
>
> I searched on Dell's site (UK) but couldn't find this anywhere.
>


Be aware (as has been posted in this ng before many times) of the physical
dimensions of the new power supply, and also that the Dell case may have to
be cut/altered to accomodate any external PS on/off switch on the back of
the machine.

Stew
Anonymous
November 2, 2004 12:23:53 AM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

I agree, I think you're solving the wrong problem.

Tom
"Ted Zieglar" <teddyz@notmail.com> wrote in message
news:41869a98$1_2@nnrp1.news.uk.psi.net...
> It's a proprietary PSU, however, replacements are available. (Search the
> Internet.) You'll pay more than you would for a 'standard' PSU.
>
> Having said that, Dell PSUs are known for being conservatively rated. What
> could you possibly need 400W for?
> --
> Ted Zieglar
>
>
> "777" <777@anemail.address> wrote in message
> news:cm5i8g$8md$1@sparta.btinternet.com...
>> I'm going to replace the 250W PSU in my Dimension 8200 (2.0Ghz - built
>> January 2001 UK) with a 400W.
>>
>> I've googled on this and found a number of worrying reports that due to
>> non-ATX compliance that a standard ATX PSU could fry the mobo.
>>
>> Anyone got a definitve answer as to whether the Dimension 8200 takes a
>> standard PSU?
>>
>>
>
>
November 2, 2004 3:19:25 PM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

"Ted Zieglar" <teddyz@notmail.com> wrote in message
news:41869a98$1_2@nnrp1.news.uk.psi.net...
> It's a proprietary PSU, however, replacements are available. (Search the
> Internet.) You'll pay more than you would for a 'standard' PSU.
>
> Having said that, Dell PSUs are known for being conservatively rated. What
> could you possibly need 400W for?
> --
> Ted Zieglar

I haven't been able to find a supplier for replacement Dell PSU's in the UK.
Anyone out there?

Note that the additional power requirements have arisen after replacing a
Gf2 Ti500 with a Radeon 9700 Pro.

I'm also running a second (PCI) graphics card servicing two monitors (total
of three). Add to that two HDD's, a floppy and two optical drives and 250W
does seem 'tight' at best.
Anonymous
November 2, 2004 3:19:26 PM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

"777" <777@anemail.address> wrote in message
news:cm7u0d$4te$1@hercules.btinternet.com...
>
> "Ted Zieglar" <teddyz@notmail.com> wrote in message
> news:41869a98$1_2@nnrp1.news.uk.psi.net...
>> It's a proprietary PSU, however, replacements are available. (Search the
>> Internet.) You'll pay more than you would for a 'standard' PSU.
>>
>> Having said that, Dell PSUs are known for being conservatively rated.
>> What
>> could you possibly need 400W for?
>> --
>> Ted Zieglar
>
> I haven't been able to find a supplier for replacement Dell PSU's in the
> UK. Anyone out there?
>
> Note that the additional power requirements have arisen after replacing a
> Gf2 Ti500 with a Radeon 9700 Pro.
>
> I'm also running a second (PCI) graphics card servicing two monitors
> (total of three). Add to that two HDD's, a floppy and two optical drives
> and 250W does seem 'tight' at best.
>


That machine actually had an option to ship with the (Dell OEM) version of
the Radeon 9700, requiring a direct plug in to the systems' power supply.

I would give the OEM supply a try first. I'm betting it will do fine.


Stew
Anonymous
November 2, 2004 3:40:08 PM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

I won't dissuade you from purchasing a new PSU if you wish, but I do believe
Dell's original PSU will be more than adequate to power the hardware you
describe. Why not try it before you go to the time and considerable expense
of purchasing a new unit? The power requirements typically described by
manufacturers for their video cards are wildly excessive.
--
Ted Zieglar

"777" <777@anemail.address> wrote in message
news:cm7u0d$4te$1@hercules.btinternet.com...
>
> "Ted Zieglar" <teddyz@notmail.com> wrote in message
> news:41869a98$1_2@nnrp1.news.uk.psi.net...
> > It's a proprietary PSU, however, replacements are available. (Search the
> > Internet.) You'll pay more than you would for a 'standard' PSU.
> >
> > Having said that, Dell PSUs are known for being conservatively rated.
What
> > could you possibly need 400W for?
> > --
> > Ted Zieglar
>
> I haven't been able to find a supplier for replacement Dell PSU's in the
UK.
> Anyone out there?
>
> Note that the additional power requirements have arisen after replacing a
> Gf2 Ti500 with a Radeon 9700 Pro.
>
> I'm also running a second (PCI) graphics card servicing two monitors
(total
> of three). Add to that two HDD's, a floppy and two optical drives and
250W
> does seem 'tight' at best.
>
>
>
>
>
Anonymous
November 2, 2004 10:26:12 PM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

I have the exact same power supply (or close) in my 4550. I run an ATI
Radeon 9800 Pro and an ATI Radeon 7000 PCI. I also have a gigabit card and
the SB Audigy 2 with Firewire. I have three internal hard drives and a DVD
burner. Gotta believe a hard drive is more power than an optical drive. I
run 6 external drives, 5 HD and 1 DVD, 2 of which get their power from the
USB ports.

Everything runs flawlessly.

Tom
"Ted Zieglar" <teddyz@notmail.com> wrote in message
news:4187c615$1_1@nnrp1.news.uk.psi.net...
>I won't dissuade you from purchasing a new PSU if you wish, but I do
>believe
> Dell's original PSU will be more than adequate to power the hardware you
> describe. Why not try it before you go to the time and considerable
> expense
> of purchasing a new unit? The power requirements typically described by
> manufacturers for their video cards are wildly excessive.
> --
> Ted Zieglar
>
> "777" <777@anemail.address> wrote in message
> news:cm7u0d$4te$1@hercules.btinternet.com...
>>
>> "Ted Zieglar" <teddyz@notmail.com> wrote in message
>> news:41869a98$1_2@nnrp1.news.uk.psi.net...
>> > It's a proprietary PSU, however, replacements are available. (Search
>> > the
>> > Internet.) You'll pay more than you would for a 'standard' PSU.
>> >
>> > Having said that, Dell PSUs are known for being conservatively rated.
> What
>> > could you possibly need 400W for?
>> > --
>> > Ted Zieglar
>>
>> I haven't been able to find a supplier for replacement Dell PSU's in the
> UK.
>> Anyone out there?
>>
>> Note that the additional power requirements have arisen after replacing a
>> Gf2 Ti500 with a Radeon 9700 Pro.
>>
>> I'm also running a second (PCI) graphics card servicing two monitors
> (total
>> of three). Add to that two HDD's, a floppy and two optical drives and
> 250W
>> does seem 'tight' at best.
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>
>
Anonymous
November 2, 2004 10:26:13 PM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

"Tom Scales" <tomtoo@softhome.net> wrote in message
news:jaidnd1P-NDfuBXcRVn-pQ@comcast.com...
>I have the exact same power supply (or close) in my 4550. I run an ATI
>Radeon 9800 Pro and an ATI Radeon 7000 PCI. I also have a gigabit card and
>the SB Audigy 2 with Firewire. I have three internal hard drives and a DVD
>burner. Gotta believe a hard drive is more power than an optical drive. I
>run 6 external drives, 5 HD and 1 DVD, 2 of which get their power from the
>USB ports.
>
> Everything runs flawlessly.
>
> Tom


I think that pretty much sums it up unless the OP just wants blue LED lights
emanating from the internals of his PS.


Stew
Anonymous
November 3, 2004 2:44:53 AM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

"S.Lewis" <stew1960@cover.bellsouth.net> wrote in message
news:IUVhd.18891$T_.12257@bignews4.bellsouth.net...
>
> "Tom Scales" <tomtoo@softhome.net> wrote in message
> news:jaidnd1P-NDfuBXcRVn-pQ@comcast.com...
> >I have the exact same power supply (or close) in my 4550. I run an
ATI
> >Radeon 9800 Pro and an ATI Radeon 7000 PCI. I also have a gigabit
card and
> >the SB Audigy 2 with Firewire. I have three internal hard drives and
a DVD
> >burner. Gotta believe a hard drive is more power than an optical
drive. I
> >run 6 external drives, 5 HD and 1 DVD, 2 of which get their power
from the
> >USB ports.
> >
> > Everything runs flawlessly.
> >
> > Tom
>
>
> I think that pretty much sums it up unless the OP just wants blue LED
lights
> emanating from the internals of his PS.
>
>
> Stew
>
>

Running an early Dim. 8200 here that has a 9800pro, CD/RW, DVD-RW,
4 internal drives (one mounted outside the case),
PCI controller card for the drives, Soundblaster Audigy,
add on USB 2 card, US Robotics hardware modem,
4 separate external drives through the USB card
(one has an independent PS), Optical USB mouse, two memory card readers
(one 6 slot and one CF that I keep a mini drive in) USB scanner, plus a
couple extra internal fans (slot fan and one on the front panel)
All running for about 2 years with no problem on the factory
power supply. Since I have owned this machine I have replaced,
a total of two items. The motherboard (had a strange intermittent
glitch reading the C:D rive) and one CPU fan.

Steve W.




----== Posted via Newsfeeds.Com - Unlimited-Uncensored-Secure Usenet News==----
http://www.newsfeeds.com The #1 Newsgroup Service in the World! >100,000 Newsgroups
---= East/West-Coast Server Farms - Total Privacy via Encryption =---
November 3, 2004 11:15:22 AM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

"Tom Scales" <tomtoo@softhome.net> wrote in message
news:jaidnd1P-NDfuBXcRVn-pQ@comcast.com...
>I have the exact same power supply (or close) in my 4550. I run an ATI
>Radeon 9800 Pro and an ATI Radeon 7000 PCI. I also have a gigabit card and
>the SB Audigy 2 with Firewire. I have three internal hard drives and a DVD
>burner. Gotta believe a hard drive is more power than an optical drive. I
>run 6 external drives, 5 HD and 1 DVD, 2 of which get their power from the
>USB ports.
>
> Everything runs flawlessly.
>
> Tom

I'm increasingly of the opinion that you and other posters are correct.
I've removed a number of components, including the second VGA card and get
exactly the same problem. Thanks for your advice (and to others) as this
has saved me the cost and hassle.

Using a tweak utility I raised the core clock - the sparkles (artifacts) get
worse immediately. I dropped the core clock, the sparkles get worse
immediately - so I don't think it's a temperature issue as there would be
some delay.

I tried the above, but with the 3D application running in a window. Only in
the window did I get the sparkles (artifacts), the rest of the screen was
fine.

Dxdiag also tells me that direct draw, direct 3D and AGP texture
acceleration are all 'not available'.

Any suggestions?
Anonymous
November 3, 2004 4:58:46 PM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

Sparkles??? New information. There are artifacts appearing on one of the
monitors on your system? If so, give serious thought to the possibility that a
graphics card is failing.

I have replaced a number of failing or failed graphics cards on clients' systems
in recent months. The usual symptom is the appearance of artifacts or shadowing
on the screen. The usual cause is improper cooling of the graphics chip due to
poor ventilation in the case or (more likely) poorly designed ventilation on the
card itself. If a graphics card uses a cheap cooling fan or if the cooling fan
fails due to dust and dirt or cheap manufacture, the graphics chip overheats and
the dielectric inside begins to break down. The most frequent graphics card
failures are the cards with nVidia chips, but no modern "hot" graphics card is
immune to failure from overheating.

Or, as you've implied with your questions, the graphics software may be pretty
badly hosed if direct draw, direct 3D and AGP texture acceleration are all 'not
available'. Aren't some of these capabilities optionally supported by a
graphics card and driver? Have you reinstalled graphics drivers and supporting
software or installed the latest versions?

.... Ben Myers

On Wed, 3 Nov 2004 08:15:22 +0000 (UTC), "777" <777@anemail.address> wrote:

>
>"Tom Scales" <tomtoo@softhome.net> wrote in message
>news:jaidnd1P-NDfuBXcRVn-pQ@comcast.com...
>>I have the exact same power supply (or close) in my 4550. I run an ATI
>>Radeon 9800 Pro and an ATI Radeon 7000 PCI. I also have a gigabit card and
>>the SB Audigy 2 with Firewire. I have three internal hard drives and a DVD
>>burner. Gotta believe a hard drive is more power than an optical drive. I
>>run 6 external drives, 5 HD and 1 DVD, 2 of which get their power from the
>>USB ports.
>>
>> Everything runs flawlessly.
>>
>> Tom
>
>I'm increasingly of the opinion that you and other posters are correct.
>I've removed a number of components, including the second VGA card and get
>exactly the same problem. Thanks for your advice (and to others) as this
>has saved me the cost and hassle.
>
>Using a tweak utility I raised the core clock - the sparkles (artifacts) get
>worse immediately. I dropped the core clock, the sparkles get worse
>immediately - so I don't think it's a temperature issue as there would be
>some delay.
>
>I tried the above, but with the 3D application running in a window. Only in
>the window did I get the sparkles (artifacts), the rest of the screen was
>fine.
>
>Dxdiag also tells me that direct draw, direct 3D and AGP texture
>acceleration are all 'not available'.
>
>Any suggestions?
>
>
Anonymous
November 3, 2004 4:58:47 PM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

Ben (and everyone else) that's exactly what happened to me. First there were
artifacts appearing on my monitor and shortly thereafter the image degraded
to what we used to call in the 60's a "bad trip." The video card had, in
fact, fried. I don't blame this on Dell necessarily, since I subsequently
learned that nVidia cards were experiencing relatively high burnout rates
for a while. Who knows if Dell's case design contributed to my video card's
demise, however, the ATi card I purchased as replacement has lasted longer
than the original nVidia card.
--
Ted Zieglar


<ben_myers_spam_me_not @ charter.net (Ben Myers)> wrote in message
news:4188e1e4.4740460@news.charter.net...
> Sparkles??? New information. There are artifacts appearing on one of
the
> monitors on your system? If so, give serious thought to the possibility
that a
> graphics card is failing.
>
> I have replaced a number of failing or failed graphics cards on clients'
systems
> in recent months. The usual symptom is the appearance of artifacts or
shadowing
> on the screen. The usual cause is improper cooling of the graphics chip
due to
> poor ventilation in the case or (more likely) poorly designed ventilation
on the
> card itself. If a graphics card uses a cheap cooling fan or if the
cooling fan
> fails due to dust and dirt or cheap manufacture, the graphics chip
overheats and
> the dielectric inside begins to break down. The most frequent graphics
card
> failures are the cards with nVidia chips, but no modern "hot" graphics
card is
> immune to failure from overheating.
>
> Or, as you've implied with your questions, the graphics software may be
pretty
> badly hosed if direct draw, direct 3D and AGP texture acceleration are all
'not
> available'. Aren't some of these capabilities optionally supported by a
> graphics card and driver? Have you reinstalled graphics drivers and
supporting
> software or installed the latest versions?
>
> ... Ben Myers
>
> On Wed, 3 Nov 2004 08:15:22 +0000 (UTC), "777" <777@anemail.address>
wrote:
>
> >
> >"Tom Scales" <tomtoo@softhome.net> wrote in message
> >news:jaidnd1P-NDfuBXcRVn-pQ@comcast.com...
> >>I have the exact same power supply (or close) in my 4550. I run an ATI
> >>Radeon 9800 Pro and an ATI Radeon 7000 PCI. I also have a gigabit card
and
> >>the SB Audigy 2 with Firewire. I have three internal hard drives and a
DVD
> >>burner. Gotta believe a hard drive is more power than an optical drive.
I
> >>run 6 external drives, 5 HD and 1 DVD, 2 of which get their power from
the
> >>USB ports.
> >>
> >> Everything runs flawlessly.
> >>
> >> Tom
> >
> >I'm increasingly of the opinion that you and other posters are correct.
> >I've removed a number of components, including the second VGA card and
get
> >exactly the same problem. Thanks for your advice (and to others) as this
> >has saved me the cost and hassle.
> >
> >Using a tweak utility I raised the core clock - the sparkles (artifacts)
get
> >worse immediately. I dropped the core clock, the sparkles get worse
> >immediately - so I don't think it's a temperature issue as there would be
> >some delay.
> >
> >I tried the above, but with the 3D application running in a window. Only
in
> >the window did I get the sparkles (artifacts), the rest of the screen was
> >fine.
> >
> >Dxdiag also tells me that direct draw, direct 3D and AGP texture
> >acceleration are all 'not available'.
> >
> >Any suggestions?
> >
> >
>
November 4, 2004 4:21:03 AM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

"Ted Zieglar" <teddyz@notmail.com> wrote in message
news:4189297a_2@nnrp1.news.uk.psi.net...
> Ben (and everyone else) that's exactly what happened to me. First there
> were
> artifacts appearing on my monitor and shortly thereafter the image
> degraded
> to what we used to call in the 60's a "bad trip." The video card had, in
> fact, fried. I don't blame this on Dell necessarily, since I subsequently
> learned that nVidia cards were experiencing relatively high burnout rates
> for a while. Who knows if Dell's case design contributed to my video
> card's
> demise, however, the ATi card I purchased as replacement has lasted longer
> than the original nVidia card.
> --
> Ted Zieglar
>
>

What I've been having real problems getting my head around is why I get
sparkles (artifacts if you will) just in the window (note window not
monitor) in which a 3D application is running. The rest of the screen is
fine.

While I'm increasingly of an opinion that throwing away the 9700 and going
back to another Nvidia card is the way forward, I'm on a bit of a mission to
understand the problem now. (And thanks to everyone that has posted BTW).
Anonymous
November 4, 2004 4:21:04 AM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

Have another machine you could test the card in?
I'd ask you to send it to me and I'd test it but the shipping would be
more hassle than it is worth...

--
Steve


"777" <777@anemail.address> wrote in message
news:cmc05v$hbv$1@hercules.btinternet.com...
>
> "Ted Zieglar" <teddyz@notmail.com> wrote in message
> news:4189297a_2@nnrp1.news.uk.psi.net...
> > Ben (and everyone else) that's exactly what happened to me. First
there
> > were
> > artifacts appearing on my monitor and shortly thereafter the image
> > degraded
> > to what we used to call in the 60's a "bad trip." The video card
had, in
> > fact, fried. I don't blame this on Dell necessarily, since I
subsequently
> > learned that nVidia cards were experiencing relatively high burnout
rates
> > for a while. Who knows if Dell's case design contributed to my video
> > card's
> > demise, however, the ATi card I purchased as replacement has lasted
longer
> > than the original nVidia card.
> > --
> > Ted Zieglar
> >
> >
>
> What I've been having real problems getting my head around is why I
get
> sparkles (artifacts if you will) just in the window (note window not
> monitor) in which a 3D application is running. The rest of the screen
is
> fine.
>
> While I'm increasingly of an opinion that throwing away the 9700 and
going
> back to another Nvidia card is the way forward, I'm on a bit of a
mission to
> understand the problem now. (And thanks to everyone that has posted
BTW).
>
>




----== Posted via Newsfeeds.Com - Unlimited-Uncensored-Secure Usenet News==----
http://www.newsfeeds.com The #1 Newsgroup Service in the World! >100,000 Newsgroups
---= East/West-Coast Server Farms - Total Privacy via Encryption =---
November 4, 2004 2:45:33 PM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

"Steve W." <me@homer.org> wrote in message news:4189c2ea$1_5@127.0.0.1...
> Have another machine you could test the card in?

Yup, works fine.
!