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Windows Media 7 TV OPTIONS!

Last response: in Windows 7
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August 15, 2009 2:49:14 PM

I plan on buying a Windows Media 7 PC in the coming months.
I also plan on dropping my Cable TV for DirectTV HD.
Since I will no longer have cable and directTV will not work with a Windows Media 7 PC what are my options for receiving TV Reception and Channels?
I do not wish to add an antenna to my roof.
Is there a good quality indoor antenna that someone can recommend that will give me the most channels in HD and Standard TV with Windows Media 7? Is this possible?
If not, then buying a Windows Media Center 7 PC might not be a wise decision unless I keep cable and forget about DirectTV.
Any opinions, suggestions and/or recommendations will be most appreciated.
Thank you in advance,
RichardM
rm289b@cox.net

More about : windows media options

a b $ Windows 7
August 15, 2009 8:39:12 PM

Unless you are very close to a tv tower or repeater an indoor aerial will not do for digital tv. In most cases a digital compatible outdoor aerial is required.
Local terrain will also have a bearing on reception, if you are on a hill, you have an advantage or in a gully not so good.
Best to check with a neighbour to see what works, or your local dealer.
Unlike anolouge tv, with digital it's all or nothing, a clear picture or none.
If you are close enough, an amplified indoor aerial may work. If you want to get one, ask if you can return it if not suitable.
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a b $ Windows 7
August 16, 2009 8:36:17 AM

One advantage cable enjoys over satellite right now is On Demand programming. Of course, it's not available in my area, but the reason I went back to cable is because my local provider was offering a satellite trade-in deal. I simply could not resist a free PVR.
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August 16, 2009 9:53:46 AM

Jonmor68 said:

Unlike anolouge tv, with digital it's all or nothing, a clear picture or none.


Not exactly, I've set a couple up. When the signal is weak but still detectable you often get blotches of what appear to be scrambled data on an otherwise good picture, as some of the data is missing.
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a b x TV
August 16, 2009 2:42:39 PM

Crashman said:
Not exactly, I've set a couple up. When the signal is weak but still detectable you often get blotches of what appear to be scrambled data on an otherwise good picture, as some of the data is missing.


True, or the picture might "freeze" for a second or two while the frame buffer fills up again.

I live in a suburb of Washington DC, about 25 miles from the "antenna farm" where many of the local stations have their antennae located. I used an indoor amplified "rotor" antenna from Radio Shark (aka "The Shack" nowadays) and it would work OK on some stations when I had it upstairs, far fewer downstairs. Once the weather cools down a bit I might climb on my roof and see how an external UHF antenna does.

OP: I suggest going to http://www.antennaweb.org/aw/Welcome.aspx and typing in your zipcode to find the best antenna for your location. Unfortunately I'm limited by my HOA restrictions as to how big an external antenna I can use, to one that is 24" or less in length.
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