profession skill

Archived from groups: rec.games.frp.dnd (More info?)

What kinds of profession skills have you come up with for your
characters? Would you think that profession:merchant is a valid choice?
26 answers Last reply
More about profession skill
  1. Archived from groups: rec.games.frp.dnd (More info?)

    In a dizzying speach from his throne, Shawn Roske
    <shawn_roske@sympatico.ca> imparted this wisdom:
    >What kinds of profession skills have you come up with for your
    >characters? Would you think that profession:merchant is a valid choice?
    >

    Can't say I've come up with any myself. Your Profession (merchant)
    fits the notion of profession related skills, but how you intend on
    implementing it in the game-mechanic sense? It seems there isn't much
    it would add to a merchant character that can't already be done with
    healthy doses of Appraise, Bluff, Diplomacy, Forgery (maybe), and
    Knowledge (local). What would a character gain by plugging ranks into
    this skill?


    --

    Argentium Helm
  2. Archived from groups: rec.games.frp.dnd (More info?)

    Argentium Helm <argentiumhelm@yahoo.co.uk> wrote in
    news:MPG.1d33c9cd21eeac35989686@news.telus.net:

    > In a dizzying speach from his throne, Shawn Roske
    > <shawn_roske@sympatico.ca> imparted this wisdom:
    >>What kinds of profession skills have you come up with for your
    >>characters? Would you think that profession:merchant is a valid choice?
    >>
    >
    > Can't say I've come up with any myself. Your Profession (merchant)
    > fits the notion of profession related skills, but how you intend on
    > implementing it in the game-mechanic sense? It seems there isn't much
    > it would add to a merchant character that can't already be done with
    > healthy doses of Appraise, Bluff, Diplomacy, Forgery (maybe), and
    > Knowledge (local). What would a character gain by plugging ranks into
    > this skill?
    >
    >
    >

    Well, besides gaining gold as normal, I would allow a character to make
    Profession checks in place of those skills but only in the field of
    trading. It could be useful for a sorcerer without many skill points.
  3. Archived from groups: rec.games.frp.dnd (More info?)

    In article <MPG.1d33c9cd21eeac35989686@news.telus.net>,
    argentiumhelm@yahoo.co.uk says...

    > >What kinds of profession skills have you come up with for your
    > >characters? Would you think that profession:merchant is a valid choice?
    >
    > Can't say I've come up with any myself. Your Profession (merchant)
    > fits the notion of profession related skills, but how you intend on
    > implementing it in the game-mechanic sense? It seems there isn't much
    > it would add to a merchant character that can't already be done with
    > healthy doses of Appraise, Bluff, Diplomacy, Forgery (maybe), and
    > Knowledge (local). What would a character gain by plugging ranks into
    > this skill?

    He could be a merchant without spending all the skill points on all the
    skills you mention.

    Still, for an adventurer, it's probably more useful to have one rank in
    each of those (except perhaps appraise) than five ranks in profession
    (merchant)...


    --
    Jasin Zujovic
    jzujovic@inet.hr
  4. Archived from groups: rec.games.frp.dnd (More info?)

    Jasin Zujovic wrote:
    > In article <MPG.1d33c9cd21eeac35989686@news.telus.net>,
    > argentiumhelm@yahoo.co.uk says...
    >
    >
    >>>What kinds of profession skills have you come up with for your
    >>>characters? Would you think that profession:merchant is a valid choice?
    >>
    >>Can't say I've come up with any myself. Your Profession (merchant)
    >>fits the notion of profession related skills, but how you intend on
    >>implementing it in the game-mechanic sense? It seems there isn't much
    >>it would add to a merchant character that can't already be done with
    >>healthy doses of Appraise, Bluff, Diplomacy, Forgery (maybe), and
    >>Knowledge (local). What would a character gain by plugging ranks into
    >>this skill?
    >
    >
    > He could be a merchant without spending all the skill points on all the
    > skills you mention.
    >
    > Still, for an adventurer, it's probably more useful to have one rank in
    > each of those (except perhaps appraise) than five ranks in profession
    > (merchant)...
    >
    >

    I have a character connected to the family business in his background.
    His craft skill shows training in some of the production aspects and I
    figure the profession aspect would work with the trading aspect.

    I don't seem to really understand the profession and craft skills. The
    books have not fleshed them out enough for me. What is the profession
    skill used for? Does service industry refer to what goes on in a hotel:
    cooking, cleaning, laundry, waiting on tables? Or, what is
    profession:innkeeper useful for, in a game-mechanic sense? Is it only
    to represent the char can make money running an inn?

    It seems the profession skill represents a characters employment and is
    a way to make money. Profession:bookseller means the char knows how to
    run a store, profession:restaurant means the char knows how to run a
    restaurant, profession:cook means the char knows how to be a cook.
    Doesn't profession:merchant mean the char knows how to make money buying
    and selling things, generally?

    The craft skill seems so much more useful than the profession skill.
    What uses are there for profession otherthan picking up a few gp a week?
  5. Archived from groups: rec.games.frp.dnd (More info?)

    Shawn Roske wrote:

    > What kinds of profession skills have you come up with for your
    > characters? Would you think that profession:merchant is a valid choice?

    Yep. When he uses his profession to earn gold, you can assume he is out
    haggling with the best of them getting a better price for loot that the
    PCs pull in.

    - Ron ^*^
  6. Archived from groups: rec.games.frp.dnd (More info?)

    Shawn Roske wrote:

    > The craft skill seems so much more useful than the profession skill.
    > What uses are there for profession otherthan picking up a few gp a week?

    Character. There's nothing like a kobold lawyer!

    - Ron ^*^
  7. Archived from groups: rec.games.frp.dnd (More info?)

    In article <uxvye.2626$is5.334414@news20.bellglobal.com>,
    Shawn Roske <shawn_roske@sympatico.ca> wrote:
    >The craft skill seems so much more useful than the profession skill.
    >What uses are there for profession otherthan picking up a few gp a week?

    IMHO Profession skills are mostly for NPCs. A PC might want one to reflect
    part of a background description, but would only use it if the campaign
    expects a LOT of downtime between adventures (IIRC Pendragon expects a fairly
    narrow adventuring window during the summer, with no winter campaigning).
    --
    "Yo' ideas need to be thinked befo' they are say'd" - Ian Lamb, age 3.5
    http://www.cs.queensu.ca/~dalamb/ qucis->cs to reply (it's a long story...)
  8. Archived from groups: rec.games.frp.dnd (More info?)

    In article <uxvye.2626$is5.334414@news20.bellglobal.com>,
    shawn_roske@sympatico.ca says...

    > >>>What kinds of profession skills have you come up with for your
    > >>>characters? Would you think that profession:merchant is a valid choice?
    > >>
    > >>Can't say I've come up with any myself. Your Profession (merchant)
    > >>fits the notion of profession related skills, but how you intend on
    > >>implementing it in the game-mechanic sense? It seems there isn't much
    > >>it would add to a merchant character that can't already be done with
    > >>healthy doses of Appraise, Bluff, Diplomacy, Forgery (maybe), and
    > >>Knowledge (local). What would a character gain by plugging ranks into
    > >>this skill?
    > >
    > > He could be a merchant without spending all the skill points on all the
    > > skills you mention.
    > >
    > > Still, for an adventurer, it's probably more useful to have one rank in
    > > each of those (except perhaps appraise) than five ranks in profession
    > > (merchant)...
    >
    > I have a character connected to the family business in his background.
    > His craft skill shows training in some of the production aspects and I
    > figure the profession aspect would work with the trading aspect.

    OK.

    > I don't seem to really understand the profession and craft skills.

    Don't worry, they're not really important. :)

    > The
    > books have not fleshed them out enough for me. What is the profession
    > skill used for? Does service industry refer to what goes on in a hotel:
    > cooking, cleaning, laundry, waiting on tables?

    I'd think so. I think the rule of thumb is: if there's a tangible
    product of your labour, it's a craft; if not, it's a profession.

    > Or, what is
    > profession:innkeeper useful for, in a game-mechanic sense? Is it only
    > to represent the char can make money running an inn?

    Pretty much. However, I quite like the idea from elsewhere in the thread
    of allowing profession to substitute, at least to an extent, for some
    other skills but only limited to the context of the profession in
    question.

    For example, profession (innkeeper) might be used like diplomacy to make
    that rowdy drunk half-orc leave quietly, or like bluff to ensure the
    guard that "no, Sargeant, we most certainly do not serve the highly
    illegal dreamflower tea in this establishment". But you couldn't use it
    to negotiate or lie in situations unconnected with innkeeping.

    Bear in mind that this potentially makes professions extremely
    versatile, and even if outright disallow stuff like profession (ninja)
    ("I hide using my profession (ninja). Hey, ninjas hide all the time! I
    decipher script using my profession (ninja). Hey, ninjas decipher secret
    code messages all the time!" &c.) you should be prepared for crafty
    minmaxing players using profession to circumvent their class skill lists
    and/or effectively get two or more skills for the price of one. If this
    is a problem, maybe profession is best left as is.

    If the substitution thingy is allowed, it's probably necessary to limit
    the it to only the routine duties for the profession... so my second
    example wouldn't work, actually, since serving illegal substances isn't
    quite routine innkeeping.

    > It seems the profession skill represents a characters employment and is
    > a way to make money. Profession:bookseller means the char knows how to
    > run a store, profession:restaurant means the char knows how to run a
    > restaurant, profession:cook means the char knows how to be a cook.
    > Doesn't profession:merchant mean the char knows how to make money buying
    > and selling things, generally?

    Sounds right.

    > The craft skill seems so much more useful than the profession skill.
    > What uses are there for profession otherthan picking up a few gp a week?

    None, I think, by the book.


    --
    Jasin Zujovic
    jzujovic@inet.hr
  9. Archived from groups: rec.games.frp.dnd (More info?)

    "Jasin Zujovic" <jzujovic@inet.hr> wrote in message
    news:MPG.1d34e948ae3aa44b989747@news.iskon.hr...
    >
    > If the substitution thingy is allowed, it's probably necessary to
    limit
    > the it to only the routine duties for the profession... so my second
    > example wouldn't work, actually, since serving illegal substances
    isn't
    > quite routine innkeeping.
    >

    I'd qualify that. In some times and places in some campaigns, it might
    be fairly standard. In my most recent campaign (which was run using
    GURPS, but I run so rules-light that it could've been pretty much any
    system), the "base" town was undergoing a shift in enforcement policy.
    Most inns and taverns were in long habit of questionable activities, and
    had established practices for how to ride out a crackdown. I would see
    no problem with using it to justify knowing how to convince concerned
    investigators that some illegal substance or other is really a
    completely different (and benign) "dietary supplement" or suchlike.

    YCMV, of course. :)

    --
    Rob
  10. Archived from groups: rec.games.frp.dnd (More info?)

    In article <JPAye.6307$0i3.4817@twister.nyroc.rr.com>,
    adalger@twcny.rr.com says...

    > > If the substitution thingy is allowed, it's probably necessary to limit
    > > the it to only the routine duties for the profession... so my second
    > > example wouldn't work, actually, since serving illegal substances isn't
    > > quite routine innkeeping.
    >
    > I'd qualify that. In some times and places in some campaigns, it might
    > be fairly standard. In my most recent campaign (which was run using
    > GURPS, but I run so rules-light that it could've been pretty much any
    > system), the "base" town was undergoing a shift in enforcement policy.
    > Most inns and taverns were in long habit of questionable activities, and
    > had established practices for how to ride out a crackdown. I would see
    > no problem with using it to justify knowing how to convince concerned
    > investigators that some illegal substance or other is really a
    > completely different (and benign) "dietary supplement" or suchlike.
    >
    > YCMV, of course. :)

    I've thought about something like that, but I'd say that a situation
    like this makes innkeeping a non-routine, almost-adventuring job, not
    that it makes lying to investigators a routine task. See my comment
    about profession (ninja).

    The goal is to make a profession about as useful as hide or knowledge
    (arcana), not to make it into an excuse to avoid taking "adventuring"
    skills.


    --
    Jasin Zujovic
    jzujovic@inet.hr
  11. Archived from groups: rec.games.frp.dnd (More info?)

    Werebat wrote:
    >
    >
    > Shawn Roske wrote:
    >
    >> The craft skill seems so much more useful than the profession skill.
    >> What uses are there for profession otherthan picking up a few gp a week?
    >
    >
    > Character. There's nothing like a kobold lawyer!
    >
    > - Ron ^*^
    >

    Q. What do you call 20 dead kobold lawyers?

    A. A good start.
  12. Archived from groups: rec.games.frp.dnd (More info?)

    Shawn Roske wrote:
    > I don't seem to really understand the profession and craft skills. The
    > books have not fleshed them out enough for me. What is the profession
    > skill used for? Does service industry refer to what goes on in a hotel:
    > cooking, cleaning, laundry, waiting on tables? Or, what is
    > profession:innkeeper useful for, in a game-mechanic sense? Is it only
    > to represent the char can make money running an inn?

    The various profession and craft skills represent both knowledge
    and experience with the profession or craft in question. Munchkins
    use skills and professions solely for character moneymaking,
    however these mechanics can enrich the game measureably, for example;

    Vought is a 3/fighter, 2nd level rogue. Before he became a fighter
    or a rogue, he was an apprentice Innkeeper. (3 Ranks Profession:
    Innkeeper).

    Vought knows how an Inn is run, he has a good idea of the supplies
    required to keep an inn in business, and a good familiarity with
    the Inn suppliers in his region of origin. In addition, when
    visiting other Inns, he can make a skills check to determine if
    the Inn he is staying in, is doing well financially, or is on the
    ropes. Vought can also make better educated guesses as to what the
    Innkeeper and the various staff is doing at any given time, while
    watching them.

    Vought can predict with better accuracy than the other players,
    where the weak points or vulnerabilities of any given inn exist,
    as well as determine the strong features. He can case an Inn
    better than the average rogue, and can also protect it better. All
    with the unique skill he learned Profession:Innkeeper, while he
    was an Innkeepers Apprentice.

    > It seems the profession skill represents a characters employment and is
    > a way to make money. Profession:bookseller means the char knows how to
    > run a store, profession:restaurant means the char knows how to run a
    > restaurant, profession:cook means the char knows how to be a cook.
    > Doesn't profession:merchant mean the char knows how to make money buying
    > and selling things, generally?

    A character could opt to make a Profession: Bookseller skills roll
    in lieu of an Appraise roll to determine the value, origin, or
    unique features of a book. Plus the character would have a better
    chance to know other booksellers, bookbinders, scribes,
    papermakers, and/or book suppliers.

    Ditto that for the other professions.

    > The craft skill seems so much more useful than the profession skill.
    > What uses are there for profession otherthan picking up a few gp a week?

    Knowing the schedules and routines in other professions. Very
    useful, if one suspects a group of rogues or bandits has taken
    over a business. The profession skills would also help a character
    evaluate a business if he/she wanted to buy an existing one.

    Tool, Armor, Survival, and Weaponmaking professions are always
    useful to give the players an edge or a boost in unusual
    circumstances. There is nothing better than having a few ranks in
    Profession: Bowmaker and Profession: Fletcher, when your bow is
    broke and the local hamlet or village has no weaponsmith shops.

    Munchkins like to gloss over this part of roleplaying in favor of
    Character Buffs, Combat, Treasure, and Character Min/Maxing, but
    the little details add believeability, and can contribute to the
    story or storyline significantly with memorable events when
    roleplayed with a touch of passion.

    Here is an example:
    "Hamlet of Quemos Aln:LN Population: 136 A fishing hamlet located
    about a mile upriver from the ocean. The folk here are a little
    bit more orderly, and prefer a quieter life than the citizens of
    Kelessa.

    The village elder is none other than Odnana Ladnenth, an 8th level
    Fighter Human.

    Str:16 Int:9 Wis:12 Con:12 Dex:8 Chr:12 Lvl:8 AC: Htk:42
    Damage/Attack: +1 Longsword / +3 Vs. lycanthropes and
    shapechangers.(1d8+4/1d8+6), and a +3 crossbow of accuracy (1d6+3).

    He wears a ring of fire resistance as well as carries a ring of
    invisibility, which he uses often to check up on his fellow
    villagers, and to follow any suspicious strangers that may wander
    into the hamlet. exp:1200. Odnana is the only guardian of the
    hamlet, although 2d6+2 militia men of 2d4 experience levels can be
    called up, and organized for a fight in less than a day.

    Quemos is unwalled, and many people here are spiritual or
    religious. There is a leather armorer in town, as well as a a
    small ale brewery that puts out six barrels a day of decent
    quality ale, and a navigational shop that sells equipment, tools,
    nautical charts, star charts, and cartography maps, primarily to
    sailing navigators, but often to adventurers, and explorers as
    well. Government buildings here include a town armory, where
    weapons, and equipment for the local militia are stored, and a
    waterworks, where water is siphoned off the river with a
    watermill, and run through fine sand, then boiled, condensed, and
    bottled or kegged, then sold to locals, visitors, and sailing
    captains alike. The waterworks employs six people and provides the
    funds for Odnana to purchase equipment for the local militia.
    There are no taxes levied in this hamlet by the local government,
    and the Hamlet has no Inn, but does have three taverns.

    Re,
    Dirk
  13. Archived from groups: rec.games.frp.dnd (More info?)

    In a dizzying speach from his throne, Shawn Roske
    <shawn_roske@sympatico.ca> imparted this wisdom:
    >I don't seem to really understand the profession and craft skills. The
    >books have not fleshed them out enough for me. What is the profession
    >skill used for? Does service industry refer to what goes on in a hotel:
    >cooking, cleaning, laundry, waiting on tables? Or, what is
    >profession:innkeeper useful for, in a game-mechanic sense? Is it only
    >to represent the char can make money running an inn?

    I share your distress, which is why I tried to play devil's advocate in
    my initial follow-up to your post. Some of the things I come up with
    IMC sound cool in concept, but then I get stumped for what game-
    mechanic benefit they could possibly offer.

    Craft skills don't trouble me at all, but Profession can be very hazy.
    Some professions strike me as straight-forward: Profession (sailor)
    implies to me a competent ability in how to navigate, steer, rig, and
    sail a sailing vessel and how to handle (and identify) all the
    equipment and tools required for the job. But something such as
    Profession (merchant), as you suggested, gives me pause. Mostly
    because of the overlap I see with the other available skills I listed.
    My gut response always is to apply selective/conditional synergy
    bonuses and that sort of thing, which, from what I've read in some of
    the threads in this group, would send many people running about the
    room with mouths frothing.


    --

    Argentium Helm
  14. Archived from groups: rec.games.frp.dnd (More info?)

    Argentium Helm wrote:
    > In a dizzying speach from his throne, Shawn Roske
    > <shawn_roske@sympatico.ca> imparted this wisdom:
    >> I don't seem to really understand the profession and craft skills. The
    >> books have not fleshed them out enough for me. What is the profession
    >> skill used for? Does service industry refer to what goes on in a hotel:
    >> cooking, cleaning, laundry, waiting on tables? Or, what is
    >> profession:innkeeper useful for, in a game-mechanic sense? Is it only
    >> to represent the char can make money running an inn?
    >
    > I share your distress, which is why I tried to play devil's advocate in
    > my initial follow-up to your post. Some of the things I come up with
    > IMC sound cool in concept, but then I get stumped for what game-
    > mechanic benefit they could possibly offer.
    >
    > Craft skills don't trouble me at all, but Profession can be very hazy.

    I can solve this problem for you:

    Game ain't a simulation of a fantasy world. It's a set of rules for playing
    heroic adventures in a fantasy world. Profession skill isn't robust because it
    doesn't much need to be.

    --
    Christopher Adams - Sydney, Australia
    What part of "Ph'nglui mglw'nafh Cthulhu R'lyeh wgah'nagl fhtagn" don't you
    understand?
    http://www.users.bigpond.net.au/mhacdebhandia/prestigeclasslist.html
    http://www.users.bigpond.net.au/mhacdebhandia/templatelist.html

    Berawler: Is there any sanity or light left in this shrivelled husk of a world?
    SingingDancingMoose: There was, but we had to trade it in for the internet.
    Berawler: That is quite possibly the best response to any question ever.
  15. Archived from groups: rec.games.frp.dnd (More info?)

    This just in:

    Thought I'd add this fuel to the fire of discussion. Last night Amazon
    dropped off _Heroes of Battle_ at my door. It's a lot thinner than I
    thought it would be (157 pages, big font). Now, granted I haven't had
    a chance to sit down and read the whole thing yet, but it may be of
    interest to this thread that the book contains the following:

    SKILL: Craft (siege engine) [pg. 94]

    You can use this skill to build catapults, mangonels, ballisti, &c.
    (There's a damned typo here regarding the page number of how and when
    this can be done. Page reference should read 63.) It also notes that
    you can use Craft (blacksmithing) and/or Craft (weaponsmithing) at a -5
    penalty to repair siege equipment.


    SKILL: Profession (siege engineer) [pg. 95]

    Use this skill to aim and operate ("lock and load!") a siege engine.


    FEAT: Ballista Proficiency [pg. 96]

    You can handle a ballista without taking a penalty to your hit roll.
    Can be selected as a fighter bonus feat.


    --

    Argentium Helm
  16. Archived from groups: rec.games.frp.dnd (More info?)

    In a dizzying speach from his throne, Christopher Adams
    <mhacdebhandia@yahoo.invalid> imparted this wisdom:
    >I can solve this problem for you:
    >
    >Game ain't a simulation of a fantasy world. It's a set of rules for playing
    >heroic adventures in a fantasy world. Profession skill isn't robust because it
    >doesn't much need to be.

    Ah. Yes, thank-you. Unless of course we all get together and tweak
    the hell out of it until it becomes robust. Then we'll all be able to
    sleep more soundly. <BG>


    --

    Argentium Helm
  17. Archived from groups: rec.games.frp.dnd (More info?)

    In a dizzying speach from his throne, Werebat <ranpoirier@cox.net>
    imparted this wisdom:
    >Character. There's nothing like a kobold lawyer!

    That brings to mind a great image, Ron, but it does lead me to go: Hmm.
    Profession (lawyer). What sort of skill overlap (synergy
    qualification) would it possess? I'm thinking:

    Bluff
    Diplomacy
    Gather Information
    Intimidate
    Knowledge (local)
    Knowledge (history)
    Knowledge (religion) -- for theocratic lawyers.
    Perform (?) -- all court sessions need theatrics.
    Sense Motive

    Have I missed any?


    --

    Argentium Helm
  18. Archived from groups: rec.games.frp.dnd (More info?)

    In a dizzying speach from his throne, Dirk Collins
    <dirk.collins@Earthlink.Net> imparted this wisdom:

    <snip!>

    >Vought can predict with better accuracy than the other players,
    >where the weak points or vulnerabilities of any given inn exist,
    >as well as determine the strong features. He can case an Inn
    >better than the average rogue, and can also protect it better. All
    >with the unique skill he learned Profession:Innkeeper, while he
    >was an Innkeepers Apprentice.

    Upon reading this it occurred to me that, should Vought's party, for
    whatever reason need to commandeer or "dummy-up" an inn (perhaps to
    ensnare a band of unsuspecting enemies), Vought could present himself
    as the establishment's "true" proprietor (perhaps with a synergy bonus
    to Bluff and/or Disguise -- my synergy fascination strikes again).
    They could rent rooms to their enemies, feed 'em, have their party's
    bard, entertain them, and then retire them comfortably to their rooms,
    only to ... Da-Dum!!! ... slit their throats while they sleep. If all
    goes well, the party's overcome a major obstacle in a most elegant and
    risk-free manner using ingenuity rather than brute destructive force,
    and made a few coin beside. Not bad for a nights work, I say.

    <snip!>

    >A character could opt to make a Profession: Bookseller skills roll
    >in lieu of an Appraise roll to determine the value, origin, or
    >unique features of a book. Plus the character would have a better
    >chance to know other booksellers, bookbinders, scribes,
    >papermakers, and/or book suppliers.
    >
    >Ditto that for the other professions.

    This was a rather insightful bit. I quite liked it. Thanks.

    <snip!>

    >Tool, Armor, Survival, and Weaponmaking professions are always
    >useful to give the players an edge or a boost in unusual
    >circumstances. There is nothing better than having a few ranks in
    >Profession: Bowmaker and Profession: Fletcher, when your bow is
    >broke and the local hamlet or village has no weaponsmith shops.

    Here I must quibble: weapon making "professions" use the Craft skill.
    You bring to mind Profession (arms dealer).


    --

    Argentium Helm
  19. Archived from groups: rec.games.frp.dnd (More info?)

    Argentium Helm wrote:
    > Christopher Adams wrote:
    >
    >> I can solve this problem for you:
    >>
    >> Game ain't a simulation of a fantasy world. It's a set of rules for
    >> playing heroic adventures in a fantasy world. Profession skill isn't
    >> robust because it doesn't much need to be.
    >
    > Ah. Yes, thank-you. Unless of course we all get together and tweak
    > the hell out of it until it becomes robust. Then we'll all be able to
    > sleep more soundly. <BG>

    You can do that . . . but why would you? There are HUNDREDS of games out there -
    by the time you finish tweaking D&D to be the game you want, all advantage of
    playing D&D (which is mainly the convenience of playing a game most gamers are
    familiar with) is utterly lost.

    Go find a game which already does what you want, man.

    --
    Christopher Adams - Sydney, Australia
    What part of "Ph'nglui mglw'nafh Cthulhu R'lyeh wgah'nagl fhtagn" don't you
    understand?
    http://www.users.bigpond.net.au/mhacdebhandia/prestigeclasslist.html
    http://www.users.bigpond.net.au/mhacdebhandia/templatelist.html

    Berawler: Is there any sanity or light left in this shrivelled husk of a world?
    SingingDancingMoose: There was, but we had to trade it in for the internet.
    Berawler: That is quite possibly the best response to any question ever.
  20. Archived from groups: rec.games.frp.dnd (More info?)

    Argentium Helm wrote:

    > In a dizzying speach from his throne, Werebat <ranpoirier@cox.net>
    > imparted this wisdom:
    >
    >>Character. There's nothing like a kobold lawyer!
    >
    >
    > That brings to mind a great image, Ron, but it does lead me to go: Hmm.
    > Profession (lawyer). What sort of skill overlap (synergy
    > qualification) would it possess? I'm thinking:
    >
    > Bluff
    > Diplomacy
    > Gather Information
    > Intimidate
    > Knowledge (local)
    > Knowledge (history)
    > Knowledge (religion) -- for theocratic lawyers.
    > Perform (?) -- all court sessions need theatrics.
    > Sense Motive
    >
    > Have I missed any?

    Pretty good skill set for a kobold lawyer. Make him an expert and set
    him loose in Sharn. Heh.

    Knowledge: Nobility would also be good, depending on the power structure
    of the land. Spot wouldn't hurt either.

    - Ron ^*^
  21. Archived from groups: rec.games.frp.dnd (More info?)

    Some Guy wrote:

    > Werebat wrote:
    >
    >>
    >>
    >> Shawn Roske wrote:
    >>
    >>> The craft skill seems so much more useful than the profession skill.
    >>> What uses are there for profession otherthan picking up a few gp a week?
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >> Character. There's nothing like a kobold lawyer!
    >>
    >> - Ron ^*^
    >>
    >
    > Q. What do you call 20 dead kobold lawyers?
    >
    > A. A good start.

    "I'm not a human wizard with ten ranks in Knowledge: Arcana, I'm a
    simple kobold... I'm frightened by your flying machine..."

    - Ron ^*^
  22. Archived from groups: rec.games.frp.dnd (More info?)

    Argentium Helm wrote:

    > But something such as
    > Profession (merchant), as you suggested, gives me pause. Mostly
    > because of the overlap I see with the other available skills I listed.

    I see Profession(Merchant) as how to run a business. At the lower
    levels that means managing finances, evaluating a resume', dealing
    with customers and suppliers, organizing work-flow, promoting my product.
    And at high levels it's the same thing, only simultaneously at
    greater scale and in greater detail. Craft(Tailor) makes me the guy
    at the end of the block with a dimly-lit shop. Add enough
    Profession(Merchant) and I become the next Yves St. Laurent or Tommy
    Hilfiger.


    Robert Huff
  23. Archived from groups: rec.games.frp.dnd (More info?)

    Shawn Roske wrote:
    > What kinds of profession skills have you come up with for your
    > characters? Would you think that profession:merchant is a valid choice?

    Thanks everyone. This has been a very helpful discussion.

    I think profession:merchant is definately viable, and the concept of a
    profession skill has developed considerably in my understanding from all
    your fine contributions.
  24. Archived from groups: rec.games.frp.dnd (More info?)

    Shawn Roske wrote:
    > Shawn Roske wrote:
    >
    >> What kinds of profession skills have you come up with for your
    >> characters? Would you think that profession:merchant is a valid choice?
    >
    >
    > Thanks everyone. This has been a very helpful discussion.
    >
    > I think profession:merchant is definately viable, and the concept of a
    > profession skill has developed considerably in my understanding from all
    > your fine contributions.

    Oh... Well, that's funny, because not once did anyone shout "RTFM!!!"

    Now how could this possibly have been a good discussion if no one did THAT?

    - Ron ^*^
  25. Archived from groups: rec.games.frp.dnd (More info?)

    Werebat wrote:
    > Shawn Roske wrote:
    >
    >> Thanks everyone. This has been a very helpful discussion.

    <snip>
    > Oh... Well, that's funny, because not once did anyone shout "RTFM!!!"
    >
    > Now how could this possibly have been a good discussion if no one did THAT?

    You just did it right then, up there, making it good in retrospect.

    --
    tussock

    Aspie at work, sorry in advance.
  26. Archived from groups: rec.games.frp.dnd (More info?)

    shawn_roske@sympatico.ca wrote:

    >I don't seem to really understand the profession and craft skills. The
    >books have not fleshed them out enough for me. What is the profession
    >skill used for? Does service industry refer to what goes on in a hotel:
    >cooking, cleaning, laundry, waiting on tables? Or, what is
    >profession:innkeeper useful for, in a game-mechanic sense? Is it only
    >to represent the char can make money running an inn?

    I suspect those skills are more for NPCs than PCs.

    --
    ======================================================================
    ISLAM: Winning the hearts and minds of the world, one bomb at a time.
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