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Administrator Problems

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Last response: in Windows 7
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May 31, 2010 12:10:22 AM

Hi, I am having a major problem here. Basically, my Windows 7 Home Premium 64-bit isn't giving me full administrator rights. So what is happening is that if you open up "Control userpasswords2" in command prompt, it has me listed as Homeusers: Administrators. This isn't full power, everytime I restart or do something I need to active just administrator, otherwise I can't do certain things and it just won't keep my setting. I want to my computer to understand that I am incharge and I am the dictator...for some reason it thinks we have a democracy but its a totalitarian dictatorship. So is there anyway it can keep my setting as being full admin so I can do things because If I don't, i can't files or delete certain files from certain places which is annoying. Thanks for the help!

Edit:
Not only this but when I got to user account in control panel, and click on "Change account Type"...it says I am standard user, and if i try changing to administrator, it won't let me. I can't even create another account with administrator privilege, it only allows standard.

What is the problem here?
Is there a hidden account called administrator like there is in Microsoft Windows XP where you need to press ctrl+alt+del twice on the login screen or go into safemode in order to access.

I am stuck, I need limitless and undenied full control over my computer.

More about : administrator problems

a c 209 $ Windows 7
May 31, 2010 1:44:46 AM

It sounds like what you want to do is to turn User Account Control (UAC) off.

UAC removes the adminstrator token from your process when you log on and prompts you whenever an action that requires administrative privileges occurs. If you concur, then the token is added back in to perform that action.

This is done because if you use an administrative account then any old virus can use administrative privileges to subvert your system. UAC annoys some, but it's actually a good thing.

If you really, REALLY want to get rid of all the UAC prompts, then go to Start -> type "UAC" into the search field, and click the "User Account Control Settings" link. Move the slider to the "Never Notify" position.

But be forewarned - this is like leaving the front door to your house unlocked.
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a b $ Windows 7
May 31, 2010 2:15:09 AM

Blackhawk1928,

You can also always go in to MSCONFIG and hit the tools tab to turn UAC off from there as well.

Jessica
Microsoft Windows Client Team
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May 31, 2010 3:03:44 AM

Okay, sounds like a solution, however why is that when I go to control panel and try to switch my account to Administrator instead of standard use, it won't let me....no matter how I try to change my account to full admin privilage, as soon as I log off/on to make the setting stay, it switches right back. Or is that UAC also?

And a lot times UAV promts me to do stuff but sometimes since I am a "standard user" it just locks me out totally...

Anyway thanks for the help so far.
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a c 209 $ Windows 7
May 31, 2010 5:09:22 AM

I'm not seeing those problems on my system when I change my normal, non-administrative account to an administrative one.

When I use "Start -> Control Panel -> User Accounts", the area in the right side of the screen that shows my picture gives my user name to the right of the picture and below that it says "Administrative User" and "Password Protected".

If, as an Administrator, I click on the "Change your Account type" link, then the change screen has the "Standard User" button selected - but that's because that's the default choice. It doesn't mean that's the type of account you have - you're still an administrator unless you hit the "Change Account Type" button at that point.
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May 31, 2010 3:31:05 PM

I see, thank you for clarifying, that was specifically what I had a problem with!
In addition, here is a another thing I don't understand.

There is another thing that can be used to control accounts and I open it through the CMD. I open up CMD as administrator and then I type in:

"control userpasswords2"

Then once I press enter, a window pops up giving me lots of control over accounts, passwords, privileges...etc.

Well thing I wanted to ask was, my name is listed as "Homeusers:Administrators" under the group category.

Here is what I mean:




Now, when I am listed as this "HomeUsers; Administrators" then there are certain files on my hard drive and other things that I can't delete or edit. So whenever I need to to do this, I go to to this, Click on my name and then select "Properties".
Once I open up "Properties" a new window pops up with two general tabs open. One tab is called "General" and the other tab is called "Group Membership".
I click on group membership. Then my membership is listed as "Other"...not "Standard User" or "Administrator" but "other". There is the word HomeUsers next to it but it is grayed out. So Once I reach this screen, I click on administrator to change my membership to. Once I do that, it asks me to log off to make the setting take into affect. After I complete this, it allows me to delete that file that I want to because I am now an Administrator. However this setting resets back as soon as I restart or something else, because no matter what, when i check it again, it has back in the "Other"...not administrator.



^Thats what I mean.

So my questions are:
1) Why won't it keep that setting as pure admin.
2)Whats the difference between "HomeUsers; Administrators"/"Other" and Just administrator.
3)How do I fix this or is there a solution.

Thank you so much for the help so far everyone! :) 

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a c 209 $ Windows 7
May 31, 2010 4:48:10 PM

"HomeUsers" and "Administrators" are security groups. Resources such as files are protected by listing the groups that are allowed to read them, write them, delete them, etc.

This is another dialogue box that's not showing you which groups the account is ALREADY in, it's giving you the option to CHANGE which groups it's in. Don't read the option as checked as indicating the current state of affairs. The current state of affairs is shown by the previous "User Accounts" dialog box / "Users" tab that lists the groups beside each user name.

The real issue here is why you can't delete the files in the first place if you have administrative privileges. Answers to the following questions would help:

What files are you trying to delete?

What is the protection on the files? (right-click the file in Windows Explorer, select "Properties", click the "Security" tab, and select the "Administrators" group to see what appears under "Permissions for Authenticated Users")

Are you trying to delete them using Windows Explorer or the Command Prompt?

Do you get a UAC prompt when you try to delete them?
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May 31, 2010 6:35:17 PM

Well...I can't find a file right now, it depends which one and usually its in installation directories like programfiles or programfiles x86. And I tried opening up the security tab on a file I randomly found in my windows directory and you can edit permissions for who to deny or allow access to certain parts. I'll have to try that. Thank so far, I think i'm grasping this very different aspect on security then it was in windows XP.

And yes, i always use windows explorer to delete files.


And
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Best solution

a c 209 $ Windows 7
May 31, 2010 8:04:16 PM

The security model for files is the same as it was for XP - the big change with Vista and Windows 7 is the addition of User Access Control (UAC). Microsoft eventually realized that begging people to use non-administrative accounts for daily use was a lost cause, so UAC automatically removes administrative privileges unless they're specifically required. At that time you get the famous prompt asking you if you really want to do that.

The prompt isn't an indication that you're not using an administrative account - it's a warning that something is about to do something that only an administrator can do. If it's something that you wanted to do, then you know it's OK to tell it to go ahead. But if it pops up for no apparent reason then chances are some virus is trying to burrow it's way into your computer.

Think of it like a peephole in the front door of your house or apartment. If you hear a knock, you look through the peephole. If you ordered pizza and there's a guy standing there with a pizza box, then it's probably a lot safer to open the door than if it's someone you don't know.
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June 2, 2010 7:31:09 PM

I see now. Thank you for explaining to me. I always get the prompts and I am fine with it and all. However sometimes when I want to save a file or delete a file from a certain location, the prompt pops up except instead of asking me if I want to continue with my action, it simply tells me you don't have the privilege to do so. Maybe it depends on the application? But anyway thanks for the help. If i find the pop again I guess I'll revive this topic.
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June 12, 2010 5:17:30 PM

Oh here! So I downloaded a demo version of a Model Flight Simulator called "Real Flight G5"...once I downloaded it asked me to log into an administrator account in order to be able to install it. I activated my admin account and it still didn't give me permission. Do you think if I turn off UAC it will allow me to?
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a c 209 $ Windows 7
June 12, 2010 8:13:46 PM

Some programs aren't smart enough to ask for administrative privileges. Instead of just double-clicking on the install program to run it, try right-clicking it and selecting "Run As Administrator".
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July 9, 2010 3:12:53 AM

Best answer selected by blackhawk1928.
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November 4, 2012 4:19:10 AM

My problem was about I cannot install anything in my laptop like adobe flash player.. It says that I need to have a permission with the administrator while I'm actually the administrator.. Is there any solution with it? Thanks for those will help me :D 
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January 10, 2013 1:05:55 PM

38687,9,450409 said:
The security model for files is the same as it was for XP - the big change with Vista and Windows 7 is the addition of User Access Control (UAC). Microsoft eventually realized that begging people to use non-administrative accounts for daily use was a lost cause, so UAC automatically removes administrative privileges unless they're specifically required. At that time you get the famous prompt asking you if you really want to do that.

I have approx 30gb on hard filled with empty folders from software that has been uninstalled. Unfortunately, I have tried change the UAC on the three different level. Every time, after I reboot, they are staying with the lock symbol on them and say I either need permission from administrator or system. I need this 30gb for the new tax software upgrade. This is the computer registered with IRS, and I can't change it now.
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