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Installing Heatsink and CPU

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  • CPUs
  • Heatsinks
Last response: in CPUs
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August 22, 2002 2:49:56 PM

Okay Guys,

I'm going to pick up some new stuff tonight but I've never installed a heatsink/cpu ever so could you guys give me some tips as to how to go about it?

I was planning on picking up some Arctic Silver 3 since I want to O/C but I don't really know how the heat sink stays put etc...

Any advice/instructions would be great =)

EDIT: I forgot to mention I'm getting a P4 1.8A and I'mjust using the stock HSF

Cooj

<P ID="edit"><FONT SIZE=-1><EM>Edited by cooj on 08/22/02 10:57 AM.</EM></FONT></P>

More about : installing heatsink cpu

August 22, 2002 3:34:15 PM

1.Install CPU in socket.
2.Apply AS3 paste on core and spread it with sharp-edged instrument (like razor blade).
3.Install HSF over CPU.
4.Attach brackets.
5.Plug Fan power connector.
Voilà!

EDIT: Using the stock HSF for OCing is not a good idea. Besides, you don't need AS3 paste if you don't overclock. The thermal paste (or pad) that comes with the product would do fine if not overclocked.

<font color=red>A platform is not an oil rig.</font color=red><P ID="edit"><FONT SIZE=-1><EM>Edited by Oracle on 08/22/02 11:39 AM.</EM></FONT></P>
August 22, 2002 3:42:12 PM

Really?

I've heard that the P4 stock HSF do just fine for O/Cing. I'm not planning on doing aht extreme stuff.. just some standard modest O/Cing

Cooj
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August 22, 2002 3:57:05 PM

Well, give it a shot if you want!
I never tried it and probably never will, but stock HSF are usually poor performers meant to dissipate just enough heat for the CPU to work properly. You won't be able to fry your P4 anyways, so go ahead and try. You might save some money by avoiding the purchase of a performance cooling solution.
Maybe stock HSF are better nowadays. It's been a while since I bought a stock HSF, so maybe someone else might have some other valuable input.


<font color=red>A platform is not an oil rig.</font color=red>
August 22, 2002 4:10:06 PM

The P4 stock HSF works very well. No need to get a different one since he is only going to do modest overclocking.

<font color=blue>Unofficial Forum Cop</font color=blue>
August 22, 2002 6:19:51 PM

You are correct. P4's OC extremely well with the retail HSF, and are very quiet (kudos Intel for that).

When installing, just be gentle. Check that all the pins are straight, and don't force anything. Arctic Silver 3 is great, just understand that less is best. I rubbed the AS into the copper face of my HS, then wiped clean (with something lint free). That gets the AS into the microscopic gaps, allowing for better heat transfer. I put 1/2 of a rice grain's worth on my XP (but you'll need more for the P4), and used a credit card to take off the excess AS3.

Again, just be gentle, take your time, and you'll be fine.

<font color=purple><i>Smokey McPot - Your Baby's Daddy</i></font color=purple>
August 22, 2002 6:25:39 PM

Quote:
EDIT: Using the stock HSF for OCing is not a good idea. Besides, you don't need AS3 paste if you don't overclock. The thermal paste (or pad) that comes with the product would do fine if not overclocked.

1) Using the stock heat sink works peachy keen for overclocking a P4. It's the <b>Athlon</b> that doesn't overclock the best with a stock heatsink.
2) Thermal pads are annoying and some of those weird ones can be a small (but noticable) pain to clean off fully if you ever do replace them with AS3 to overclock.
3) No one <i>needs</i> AS3, period. However, it's still nice to have if for no other reason than just because it's the best. ;) 

<pre><A HREF="http://www.nuklearpower.com/comic/186.htm" target="_new"><font color=red>It's all relative...</font color=red></A></pre><p>
August 22, 2002 6:29:21 PM

Everyone has covered most of everything. :) 
One other tip though: Whatever you do, <i>don't</i> spread the thermal paste with anything that can leave a residue. (And <i>especially</i> don't spread it with your finger.) Residue, especially the natural oils secreted by human skin, does not play nicely with others. In fact, residue can be downright anti-social. ;) 

<pre><A HREF="http://www.nuklearpower.com/comic/186.htm" target="_new"><font color=red>It's all relative...</font color=red></A></pre><p>
August 22, 2002 6:58:02 PM

Okay, after reading the posts and the AS3 guide I think I know what to do. Now all I need to do is find something that has non lint and that I don't want anymore =)

One last question/verification: On the HSF I'm supposed to rub it into the gaps inbetween, BUT on the processor I'm supposed to leave a thin even film (using something like a credit card, knife etc) correct? If halfa grain of rice is too little for a p4, should I be looking towards 3/4 of a grain or a full grain?

If I accidentaly let some AS3 flow over the side what should I use to clean it up? Non lint material should be good nuff right?

Cooj
!