Unethical: No replacement drive shipped if we keep ours

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

I think that it's unethical to force people returning their hard disk,
even when they say that they have private, confidential or proprietary
data on it. We can not send it to them but they won't send a
replacement. And that's a drive still on warranty. Or we can keep our
drive and they will charge us for the replacement. But I prefer buying
it elsewhere cause it's cheaper.

It's unfair because, since their hard disk is physically damaged, they
have no (software) means of destroying the data on it. We know that
well equipped commercial labs are able to read our data, and it's not
reassuring. How can we be ABSOLUTELY sure that Dell/their
partners/their employees/anyone won't try to read the data on our
disk? We cannot, even if we trust them. I think the question is not
about trust. It's about not taking chances of exposing credit card
numbers, passwords, private/proprietary information. The only sure way
that nobody puts an eye on our confidential data, is to physically
destroy our hard drive ourselves.

The only way I will trust Dell or any other company is if they tell
me: "Your hard drive failed and is still on warranty? Don't worry.
We'll ship a new one today and you can keep the one that failed."

They say they offer a "Keep Your Hard Drive" Service, but this option
is not available when we buy online. Only on the phone.
(http://www1.us.dell.com/content/topics/global.aspx/services/en/keep_harddrive?c=us&cs=RC968571&l=en&s=hea)

The next time I'll buy a computer, I'll think twice before considering
a company that asks their consumers to return their hard drive against
their will.

I wonder what the Office of the Privacy Commissioner of Canada (Since
I'm living in Canada; www.privcom.gc.ca) would say about that? Maybe
someone should send them a link to this post?
19 answers Last reply
More about unethical replacement drive shipped ours
  1. Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

    On 16 Nov 2004 12:40:24 -0800, neilsanner@yahoo.com (Neilsanner)
    wrote:

    >I think that it's unethical to force people returning their hard disk,
    >even when they say that they have private, confidential or proprietary
    >data on it. We can not send it to them but they won't send a
    >replacement. And that's a drive still on warranty. Or we can keep our
    >drive and they will charge us for the replacement. But I prefer buying
    >it elsewhere cause it's cheaper.
    >
    >It's unfair because, since their hard disk is physically damaged, they
    >have no (software) means of destroying the data on it. We know that
    >well equipped commercial labs are able to read our data, and it's not
    >reassuring. How can we be ABSOLUTELY sure that Dell/their
    >partners/their employees/anyone won't try to read the data on our
    >disk? We cannot, even if we trust them. I think the question is not
    >about trust. It's about not taking chances of exposing credit card
    >numbers, passwords, private/proprietary information. The only sure way
    >that nobody puts an eye on our confidential data, is to physically
    >destroy our hard drive ourselves.
    >
    >The only way I will trust Dell or any other company is if they tell
    >me: "Your hard drive failed and is still on warranty? Don't worry.
    >We'll ship a new one today and you can keep the one that failed."
    >
    >They say they offer a "Keep Your Hard Drive" Service, but this option
    >is not available when we buy online. Only on the phone.
    >(http://www1.us.dell.com/content/topics/global.aspx/services/en/keep_harddrive?c=us&cs=RC968571&l=en&s=hea)
    >
    >The next time I'll buy a computer, I'll think twice before considering
    >a company that asks their consumers to return their hard drive against
    >their will.
    >
    >I wonder what the Office of the Privacy Commissioner of Canada (Since
    >I'm living in Canada; www.privcom.gc.ca) would say about that? Maybe
    >someone should send them a link to this post?

    Clobber your old drive with a sledgehammer, then ship it to Dell.
    Damage it beyond what a commercial lab can recover, I'll bet Dell will
    still replace it as long as they can read the part numbers and serial
    numbers.

    -- Or --

    Don't be so paranoid about your credit card numbers. If your data is
    far more sensitive, accept the cost of your hard disk as a defensive
    security measure. Realize that Dell has a genuine concern about abuse
    and/or fraud.
  2. Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

    They ALL want the drive returned. I would if I was them. Your call -- if
    the data is confidential, eat the cost of the drive.


    "Neilsanner" <neilsanner@yahoo.com> wrote in message
    news:589ea3a8.0411161240.1015b541@posting.google.com...
    >I think that it's unethical to force people returning their hard disk,
    > even when they say that they have private, confidential or proprietary
    > data on it. We can not send it to them but they won't send a
    > replacement. And that's a drive still on warranty. Or we can keep our
    > drive and they will charge us for the replacement. But I prefer buying
    > it elsewhere cause it's cheaper.
    >
    > It's unfair because, since their hard disk is physically damaged, they
    > have no (software) means of destroying the data on it. We know that
    > well equipped commercial labs are able to read our data, and it's not
    > reassuring. How can we be ABSOLUTELY sure that Dell/their
    > partners/their employees/anyone won't try to read the data on our
    > disk? We cannot, even if we trust them. I think the question is not
    > about trust. It's about not taking chances of exposing credit card
    > numbers, passwords, private/proprietary information. The only sure way
    > that nobody puts an eye on our confidential data, is to physically
    > destroy our hard drive ourselves.
    >
    > The only way I will trust Dell or any other company is if they tell
    > me: "Your hard drive failed and is still on warranty? Don't worry.
    > We'll ship a new one today and you can keep the one that failed."
    >
    > They say they offer a "Keep Your Hard Drive" Service, but this option
    > is not available when we buy online. Only on the phone.
    > (http://www1.us.dell.com/content/topics/global.aspx/services/en/keep_harddrive?c=us&cs=RC968571&l=en&s=hea)
    >
    > The next time I'll buy a computer, I'll think twice before considering
    > a company that asks their consumers to return their hard drive against
    > their will.
    >
    > I wonder what the Office of the Privacy Commissioner of Canada (Since
    > I'm living in Canada; www.privcom.gc.ca) would say about that? Maybe
    > someone should send them a link to this post?
  3. Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

    Could you, perhaps, backup your old hard disk to DVDs and then format it?
    --
    Ted Zieglar


    "Neilsanner" <neilsanner@yahoo.com> wrote in message
    news:589ea3a8.0411161240.1015b541@posting.google.com...
    > I think that it's unethical to force people returning their hard disk,
    > even when they say that they have private, confidential or proprietary
    > data on it. We can not send it to them but they won't send a
    > replacement. And that's a drive still on warranty. Or we can keep our
    > drive and they will charge us for the replacement. But I prefer buying
    > it elsewhere cause it's cheaper.
    >
    > It's unfair because, since their hard disk is physically damaged, they
    > have no (software) means of destroying the data on it. We know that
    > well equipped commercial labs are able to read our data, and it's not
    > reassuring. How can we be ABSOLUTELY sure that Dell/their
    > partners/their employees/anyone won't try to read the data on our
    > disk? We cannot, even if we trust them. I think the question is not
    > about trust. It's about not taking chances of exposing credit card
    > numbers, passwords, private/proprietary information. The only sure way
    > that nobody puts an eye on our confidential data, is to physically
    > destroy our hard drive ourselves.
    >
    > The only way I will trust Dell or any other company is if they tell
    > me: "Your hard drive failed and is still on warranty? Don't worry.
    > We'll ship a new one today and you can keep the one that failed."
    >
    > They say they offer a "Keep Your Hard Drive" Service, but this option
    > is not available when we buy online. Only on the phone.
    >
    (http://www1.us.dell.com/content/topics/global.aspx/services/en/keep_harddri
    ve?c=us&cs=RC968571&l=en&s=hea)
    >
    > The next time I'll buy a computer, I'll think twice before considering
    > a company that asks their consumers to return their hard drive against
    > their will.
    >
    > I wonder what the Office of the Privacy Commissioner of Canada (Since
    > I'm living in Canada; www.privcom.gc.ca) would say about that? Maybe
    > someone should send them a link to this post?
  4. Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

    Neilsanner,
    I doubt Dell would go through the trouble trying to get your info off of
    the hard drive, they probably just ship it back to the OEM. But if the info
    on that drive is that sensitive and a security threat, just buy another HD,
    cheap peace of mind. Better yet, buy two and RAID 1 them so next time you're
    covered.
    Paul

    "Neilsanner" <neilsanner@yahoo.com> wrote in message
    news:589ea3a8.0411161240.1015b541@posting.google.com...
    >I think that it's unethical to force people returning their hard disk,
    > even when they say that they have private, confidential or proprietary
    > data on it. We can not send it to them but they won't send a
    > replacement. And that's a drive still on warranty. Or we can keep our
    > drive and they will charge us for the replacement. But I prefer buying
    > it elsewhere cause it's cheaper.
    >
    > It's unfair because, since their hard disk is physically damaged, they
    > have no (software) means of destroying the data on it. We know that
    > well equipped commercial labs are able to read our data, and it's not
    > reassuring. How can we be ABSOLUTELY sure that Dell/their
    > partners/their employees/anyone won't try to read the data on our
    > disk? We cannot, even if we trust them. I think the question is not
    > about trust. It's about not taking chances of exposing credit card
    > numbers, passwords, private/proprietary information. The only sure way
    > that nobody puts an eye on our confidential data, is to physically
    > destroy our hard drive ourselves.
    >
    > The only way I will trust Dell or any other company is if they tell
    > me: "Your hard drive failed and is still on warranty? Don't worry.
    > We'll ship a new one today and you can keep the one that failed."
    >
    > They say they offer a "Keep Your Hard Drive" Service, but this option
    > is not available when we buy online. Only on the phone.
    > (http://www1.us.dell.com/content/topics/global.aspx/services/en/keep_harddrive?c=us&cs=RC968571&l=en&s=hea)
    >
    > The next time I'll buy a computer, I'll think twice before considering
    > a company that asks their consumers to return their hard drive against
    > their will.
    >
    > I wonder what the Office of the Privacy Commissioner of Canada (Since
    > I'm living in Canada; www.privcom.gc.ca) would say about that? Maybe
    > someone should send them a link to this post?
  5. Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

    I am at a loss to understand why you would keep data that you
    consider that "sensitive" on your hard drive.
    Data that we consider sensitive is either not stored on the hard drive or
    encrypted. Either way if the hard drive fails, it doesn't create a problem
    for us.


    "Neilsanner" <neilsanner@yahoo.com> wrote in message
    news:589ea3a8.0411161240.1015b541@posting.google.com...
    > I think that it's unethical to force people returning their hard disk,
    > even when they say that they have private, confidential or proprietary
    > data on it. We can not send it to them but they won't send a
    > replacement. And that's a drive still on warranty. Or we can keep our
    > drive and they will charge us for the replacement. But I prefer buying
    > it elsewhere cause it's cheaper.
    >
    > It's unfair because, since their hard disk is physically damaged, they
    > have no (software) means of destroying the data on it. We know that
    > well equipped commercial labs are able to read our data, and it's not
    > reassuring. How can we be ABSOLUTELY sure that Dell/their
    > partners/their employees/anyone won't try to read the data on our
    > disk? We cannot, even if we trust them. I think the question is not
    > about trust. It's about not taking chances of exposing credit card
    > numbers, passwords, private/proprietary information. The only sure way
    > that nobody puts an eye on our confidential data, is to physically
    > destroy our hard drive ourselves.
    >
    > The only way I will trust Dell or any other company is if they tell
    > me: "Your hard drive failed and is still on warranty? Don't worry.
    > We'll ship a new one today and you can keep the one that failed."
    >
    > They say they offer a "Keep Your Hard Drive" Service, but this option
    > is not available when we buy online. Only on the phone.
    >
    (http://www1.us.dell.com/content/topics/global.aspx/services/en/keep_harddri
    ve?c=us&cs=RC968571&l=en&s=hea)
    >
    > The next time I'll buy a computer, I'll think twice before considering
    > a company that asks their consumers to return their hard drive against
    > their will.
    >
    > I wonder what the Office of the Privacy Commissioner of Canada (Since
    > I'm living in Canada; www.privcom.gc.ca) would say about that? Maybe
    > someone should send them a link to this post?
  6. Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

    "Tom Scales" <tomtoo@softhome.net> wrote in message
    news:4fqdnQW4F-1oDQfcRVn-vg@comcast.com...
    > They ALL want the drive returned. I would if I was them. Your call -- if
    > the data is confidential, eat the cost of the drive.
    >
    >


    The OP can either wipe the drive with a DoD quality eraser, or simply buy a
    replacement drive and keep the old one. That's a lot of complaining for a
    very small problem in my estimation, especially given the low cost of hard
    disks these days.


    Stew
  7. Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

    Neilsanner wrote:

    > I think that it's unethical to force people returning their hard disk,
    > even when they say that they have private, confidential or proprietary
    > data on it. We can not send it to them but they won't send a
    > replacement. And that's a drive still on warranty. Or we can keep our
    > drive and they will charge us for the replacement. But I prefer buying
    > it elsewhere cause it's cheaper.
    >
    > It's unfair because, since their hard disk is physically damaged, they
    > have no (software) means of destroying the data on it. We know that
    > well equipped commercial labs are able to read our data, and it's not
    > reassuring. How can we be ABSOLUTELY sure that Dell/their
    > partners/their employees/anyone won't try to read the data on our
    > disk? We cannot, even if we trust them. I think the question is not
    > about trust. It's about not taking chances of exposing credit card
    > numbers, passwords, private/proprietary information. The only sure way
    > that nobody puts an eye on our confidential data, is to physically
    > destroy our hard drive ourselves.
    >
    > The only way I will trust Dell or any other company is if they tell
    > me: "Your hard drive failed and is still on warranty? Don't worry.
    > We'll ship a new one today and you can keep the one that failed."
    >
    > They say they offer a "Keep Your Hard Drive" Service, but this option
    > is not available when we buy online. Only on the phone.
    >
    (http://www1.us.dell.com/content/topics/global.aspx/services/en/keep_harddrive?c=us&cs=RC968571&l=en&s=hea)
    >
    > The next time I'll buy a computer, I'll think twice before considering
    > a company that asks their consumers to return their hard drive against
    > their will.
    >
    > I wonder what the Office of the Privacy Commissioner of Canada (Since
    > I'm living in Canada; www.privcom.gc.ca) would say about that? Maybe
    > someone should send them a link to this post?

    People would take advantage of that to get free drives.
    What dell is doing is perfectly normal. If your TV breaks you send it back,
    you don't get to keep it and the replacement. If your data is that
    important then you buy a new drive yourself. My data is important to me so
    I have a spare drive sitting waiting already. I paid the $ up front to
    keep a spare around.
    Many companies destroy hdd's before getting rid of their old pc's.
  8. Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

    neilsanner@yahoo.com (Neilsanner) wrote:
    >How can we be ABSOLUTELY sure that Dell/their
    >partners/their employees/anyone won't try to read the data on our
    >disk? We cannot, even if we trust them.

    How can Dell trust that the drive you claim failed really has?

    Sounds like they have a plan, which you should buy for your next
    computer. In the meantime, a new drive is around $100, so consider
    that the price of ensuring your data is not compromised.

    Wonder what the "Keep Your Hard Drive" plan costs?
  9. Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

    neilsanner@yahoo.com (Neilsanner) writes:

    >The next time I'll buy a computer, I'll think twice before considering
    >a company that asks their consumers to return their hard drive against
    >their will.

    Do you really think Dell is going to spend the money to reconstruct the
    data from a dead hard drive? How much money will that cost them?

    Dell needs the dead drive back so they can get a new drive from the
    supplier.

    Dell isn't just going to give out free hard drives. What would stop
    thieves from claiming their drive died to a free one?

    Brian Elfert
  10. Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

    Just think of all the people getting free hard drives if returning
    weren't necessary.

    -
    http://mysite.verizon.net/vze8adrh/news.html (profile) --Tim923 My email is valid.
  11. Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

    put it in a microwave oven for 15 seconds. Make sure the oven belongs to
    someone else.

    "Neilsanner" <neilsanner@yahoo.com> wrote in message
    news:589ea3a8.0411161240.1015b541@posting.google.com...
    >I think that it's unethical to force people returning their hard disk,
    > even when they say that they have private, confidential or proprietary
    > data on it. We can not send it to them but they won't send a
    > replacement. And that's a drive still on warranty. Or we can keep our
    > drive and they will charge us for the replacement. But I prefer buying
    > it elsewhere cause it's cheaper.
    >
    > It's unfair because, since their hard disk is physically damaged, they
    > have no (software) means of destroying the data on it. We know that
    > well equipped commercial labs are able to read our data, and it's not
    > reassuring. How can we be ABSOLUTELY sure that Dell/their
    > partners/their employees/anyone won't try to read the data on our
    > disk? We cannot, even if we trust them. I think the question is not
    > about trust. It's about not taking chances of exposing credit card
    > numbers, passwords, private/proprietary information. The only sure way
    > that nobody puts an eye on our confidential data, is to physically
    > destroy our hard drive ourselves.
    >
    > The only way I will trust Dell or any other company is if they tell
    > me: "Your hard drive failed and is still on warranty? Don't worry.
    > We'll ship a new one today and you can keep the one that failed."
    >
    > They say they offer a "Keep Your Hard Drive" Service, but this option
    > is not available when we buy online. Only on the phone.
    > (http://www1.us.dell.com/content/topics/global.aspx/services/en/keep_harddrive?c=us&cs=RC968571&l=en&s=hea)
    >
    > The next time I'll buy a computer, I'll think twice before considering
    > a company that asks their consumers to return their hard drive against
    > their will.
    >
    > I wonder what the Office of the Privacy Commissioner of Canada (Since
    > I'm living in Canada; www.privcom.gc.ca) would say about that? Maybe
    > someone should send them a link to this post?
  12. Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

    Dell ships failed hard drives back to the manufacturer for rebuilding. It
    is part of the contract Dell has with the manufacturer. Dell then uses
    these repaired drives for warranty replacements. You are being
    unreasonable. If you want to keep the old drive, buy a new one and keep the
    old one.

    "Neilsanner" <neilsanner@yahoo.com> wrote in message
    news:589ea3a8.0411161240.1015b541@posting.google.com...
    >I think that it's unethical to force people returning their hard disk,
    > even when they say that they have private, confidential or proprietary
    > data on it. We can not send it to them but they won't send a
    > replacement. And that's a drive still on warranty. Or we can keep our
    > drive and they will charge us for the replacement. But I prefer buying
    > it elsewhere cause it's cheaper.
    >
    > It's unfair because, since their hard disk is physically damaged, they
    > have no (software) means of destroying the data on it. We know that
    > well equipped commercial labs are able to read our data, and it's not
    > reassuring. How can we be ABSOLUTELY sure that Dell/their
    > partners/their employees/anyone won't try to read the data on our
    > disk? We cannot, even if we trust them. I think the question is not
    > about trust. It's about not taking chances of exposing credit card
    > numbers, passwords, private/proprietary information. The only sure way
    > that nobody puts an eye on our confidential data, is to physically
    > destroy our hard drive ourselves.
    >
    > The only way I will trust Dell or any other company is if they tell
    > me: "Your hard drive failed and is still on warranty? Don't worry.
    > We'll ship a new one today and you can keep the one that failed."
    >
    > They say they offer a "Keep Your Hard Drive" Service, but this option
    > is not available when we buy online. Only on the phone.
    > (http://www1.us.dell.com/content/topics/global.aspx/services/en/keep_harddrive?c=us&cs=RC968571&l=en&s=hea)
    >
    > The next time I'll buy a computer, I'll think twice before considering
    > a company that asks their consumers to return their hard drive against
    > their will.
    >
    > I wonder what the Office of the Privacy Commissioner of Canada (Since
    > I'm living in Canada; www.privcom.gc.ca) would say about that? Maybe
    > someone should send them a link to this post?
  13. Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

    neilsanner@yahoo.com (Neilsanner) wrote in
    news:589ea3a8.0411161240.1015b541@posting.google.com:

    > The next time I'll buy a computer, I'll think twice before
    > considering a company that asks their consumers to return their
    > hard drive against their will.

    I think you will have a lot of double-thinking to do because I doubt
    you will find any supplier that meets your requirement.
  14. Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

    "I wonder what the Office of the Privacy Commissioner of Canada..."
    Most likely nothing since it was your choice when you bought the
    component and warranty.
    Most likely nothing because it is your choice to keep the drive or
    send it back.
    You have all the control and make your own choice.

    The way you suggest would encourage people to steal hard drives from
    the manufacturers by lying about drive condition.

    --
    Jupiter Jones
    http://www3.telus.net/dandemar/


    "Neilsanner" <neilsanner@yahoo.com> wrote in message
    news:589ea3a8.0411161240.1015b541@posting.google.com...
    >I think that it's unethical to force people returning their hard
    >disk,
    > even when they say that they have private, confidential or
    > proprietary
    > data on it. We can not send it to them but they won't send a
    > replacement. And that's a drive still on warranty. Or we can keep
    > our
    > drive and they will charge us for the replacement. But I prefer
    > buying
    > it elsewhere cause it's cheaper.
    >
    > It's unfair because, since their hard disk is physically damaged,
    > they
    > have no (software) means of destroying the data on it. We know that
    > well equipped commercial labs are able to read our data, and it's
    > not
    > reassuring. How can we be ABSOLUTELY sure that Dell/their
    > partners/their employees/anyone won't try to read the data on our
    > disk? We cannot, even if we trust them. I think the question is not
    > about trust. It's about not taking chances of exposing credit card
    > numbers, passwords, private/proprietary information. The only sure
    > way
    > that nobody puts an eye on our confidential data, is to physically
    > destroy our hard drive ourselves.
    >
    > The only way I will trust Dell or any other company is if they tell
    > me: "Your hard drive failed and is still on warranty? Don't worry.
    > We'll ship a new one today and you can keep the one that failed."
    >
    > They say they offer a "Keep Your Hard Drive" Service, but this
    > option
    > is not available when we buy online. Only on the phone.
    > (http://www1.us.dell.com/content/topics/global.aspx/services/en/keep_harddrive?c=us&cs=RC968571&l=en&s=hea)
    >
    > The next time I'll buy a computer, I'll think twice before
    > considering
    > a company that asks their consumers to return their hard drive
    > against
    > their will.
    >
    > I wonder what the Office of the Privacy Commissioner of Canada
    > (Since
    > I'm living in Canada; www.privcom.gc.ca) would say about that? Maybe
    > someone should send them a link to this post?
  15. Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

    Neilsanner wrote:
    > I think that it's unethical to force people returning their hard disk,
    > even when they say that they have private, confidential or proprietary
    > data on it. We can not send it to them but they won't send a
    > replacement. And that's a drive still on warranty. Or we can keep our
    > drive and they will charge us for the replacement. But I prefer buying
    > it elsewhere cause it's cheaper.

    So buy one elsewhere. I don't think it's reasonable for any manufacturer
    to send out replacement HDDs when the customer says it contains private
    data and can't be returned. I'm sure you can foresee the stampede for
    "replacement" HDDs if anyone had such a policy.
  16. Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

    "Ted Zieglar" <teddyz@notmail.com> wrote:
    >Could you, perhaps, backup your old hard disk to DVDs and then format it?

    Not if the drive has failed completely, but might still be vulnerable
    to data recovery or repair....
  17. Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

    In the UK we have situations for establishments like Hospitals that have
    private patient data on them, so they buy new drives from Dell and keep the
    old ones and destroy them themselves. IMHO to expect Dell to replace your
    failed HDD FOC and for you to keep the old one as well is expecting far far
    too much and is a non starter and has nothing to do with being unethical
    "Sparky" <nemo@moon.sun.edu> wrote in message
    news:_GMmd.10261$hc5.5046104@news4.srv.hcvlny.cv.net...
    > Neilsanner wrote:
    >> I think that it's unethical to force people returning their hard disk,
    >> even when they say that they have private, confidential or proprietary
    >> data on it. We can not send it to them but they won't send a
    >> replacement. And that's a drive still on warranty. Or we can keep our
    >> drive and they will charge us for the replacement. But I prefer buying
    >> it elsewhere cause it's cheaper.
    >
    > So buy one elsewhere. I don't think it's reasonable for any manufacturer
    > to send out replacement HDDs when the customer says it contains private
    > data and can't be returned. I'm sure you can foresee the stampede for
    > "replacement" HDDs if anyone had such a policy.
  18. Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

    On 16 Nov 2004 12:40:24 -0800, in
    <589ea3a8.0411161240.1015b541@posting.google.com>,
    neilsanner@yahoo.com (Neilsanner) wrote:

    >I think that it's unethical to force people returning their hard disk,
    >even when they say that they have private, confidential or proprietary
    >data on it. We can not send it to them but they won't send a
    >replacement.

    "Replacement" clearly indicates that you return the old drive.

    If your lost information is so important to you, eat the $200 or
    so that a new drive costs, and if it's too bitter a pill to
    swallow to buy the new one from Dell, then buy it at your local
    Staples or Office Max.

    [snip]


    >I wonder what the Office of the Privacy Commissioner
    >of Canada (Since I'm living in Canada; www.privcom.gc.ca)
    >would say about that? Maybe someone should send them
    >a link to this post?

    I don't know. Send it on and tell us what they say. Should be
    good for a laugh.
  19. Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

    Wow! This question got blasted!!

    I wish to inform you all that I decided to keep the drive and buy a
    new one. And for the same price Dell would charge me I get double the
    GBs!! It's not that bad after all, a brand new, roomier HD.

    I have no problem returning a DVD drive or a floppy drive, but when it
    comes to a HD I believe that it's a more sensitive issue.

    IMHO I think that the "Keep Your Hard Drive" Service option should be
    available for all online orders. That way a customer couldn't complain
    at all if he decides to keep the damaged drive.

    I also think the vendor shouldn't charge the price of a brand new
    drive if we decide to keep the failed one. I think it would be nicer
    for the customer if they would simply charge a reasonable fee. After
    all, it's a drive on warranty.

    But hey! After all, my arm isn't broken after buying a new nicer HD.
    And cheers for encryption!


    William P.N. Smith wrote in message news:<k9qnp0l6nfpd472kmqp1pubmm4h5o5i1en@4ax.com>...
    > "Ted Zieglar" <teddyz@notmail.com> wrote:
    > >Could you, perhaps, backup your old hard disk to DVDs and then format it?
    >
    > Not if the drive has failed completely, but might still be vulnerable
    > to data recovery or repair....
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