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flat panel when not in use

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November 21, 2004 2:58:24 AM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

Knowing that the flat panel's bulb has a certain life expectancy,
is it better to turn off the flat panel when not in use to prolong the
bulb's life or not? I have a blank screen saver but I don't really
think that saves the bulb just lessens the brightness.

TIA

More about : flat panel

Anonymous
November 21, 2004 2:42:29 PM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

panles dont use bulbs. They use transformable LCD elements.

Are you referring to the backlight ?

- NuTs

<jim> wrote in message news:17b0q0p78o9qgdokack402tde1hpgdeu2q@4ax.com...
> Knowing that the flat panel's bulb has a certain life expectancy,
> is it better to turn off the flat panel when not in use to prolong the
> bulb's life or not? I have a blank screen saver but I don't really
> think that saves the bulb just lessens the brightness.
>
> TIA
November 21, 2004 3:20:50 PM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

jim wrote:

> Knowing that the flat panel's bulb has a certain life expectancy,
> is it better to turn off the flat panel when not in use to prolong the
> bulb's life or not? I have a blank screen saver but I don't really
> think that saves the bulb just lessens the brightness.
>
> TIA
I ran a laptop 24x7 and the bulb lasted 4 years before dimming, chances are
you will buy a new monitor before then.
Even so the bulb is $10 and it takes about an hour of disassembly,
desoldering, resoldering and reassembly to change one.
Related resources
November 21, 2004 4:29:39 PM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

NuTCrAcKeR wrote:

> panles dont use bulbs. They use transformable LCD elements.
>
> Are you referring to the backlight ?
>
yes
Anonymous
November 21, 2004 5:46:01 PM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

Indeed don't just use the blank screen saver, instead auto-off the
backlight after some time, ie in XP:

Control Panel > Display > Screen Saver > Power > Power Schemes > Turn
off monitor

<jim> wrote in message
news:17b0q0p78o9qgdokack402tde1hpgdeu2q@4ax.com...
> Knowing that the flat panel's bulb has a certain life expectancy,
> is it better to turn off the flat panel when not in use to prolong
> the
> bulb's life or not? I have a blank screen saver but I don't really
> think that saves the bulb just lessens the brightness.
>
> TIA
Anonymous
November 29, 2004 10:09:51 PM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

I have my Dell setup to go to a screen saver in 5 minutes of
inactivity. A few minutes later the flat panel will automatically go
off. Of course, if I leave the computer for a while I will turn off
the monitor.

Would the monitor wear out sooner turning it off and on or leaving it
on all day?
Anonymous
November 29, 2004 10:09:52 PM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

The benefits of a screen saver is to prevent burn-in -- the ghost images
that end up burned into a screen. you can most often notice these patterns
on bank teller machines.

The benefits of turning your monitor off is to also prevent burn-in (I once
noticed a *static* screen saver that resulted in the burn-in effect!) but
even more importantly, to save electricity. You don't hear much about the
"energy crisis" these days, but the fact is, every drop of electricity saved
is money kept in your pocket instead of someone else's. With a laptop
screen running over $2000.oo for the high-end units, I'm willing to bet that
the faster the power goes off, the longer it's going to last.

Dick Silk -- The Computer Tutor
http://personalpages.tds.net/~rcsilk
for rates and online chat

- Are dog biscuits made from collie flour?


"davinp" <dpete47@hotmail-dot-com.no-spam.invalid> wrote in message
news:41abba4f$3_3@alt.athenanews.com...
>I have my Dell setup to go to a screen saver in 5 minutes of
> inactivity. A few minutes later the flat panel will automatically go
> off. Of course, if I leave the computer for a while I will turn off
> the monitor.
>
> Would the monitor wear out sooner turning it off and on or leaving it
> on all day?
>
November 30, 2004 12:59:12 AM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

personalpages.tds.net/~rcsilk wrote:
With a laptop
> screen running over $2000.oo for the high-end units, I'm willing to bet
> that the faster the power goes off, the longer it's going to last.
>
LCD's do not wear out so it doesn't make a difference.
Anonymous
November 30, 2004 3:54:24 AM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

I'll buy that, as long as the word "theoretically" is inserted... :-)
still, I had an onsite tech inform me that there is a bulb of sorts involved
on some types of laptop screens, so -- in that case, it's better to play it
safe if you don't know *exactly* what type of screen you have.

"Eugene" <nospam@columbus.rr.com> wrote in message
news:XqidnSXY9rZYfzbcRVn-tQ@wideopenwest.com...
> personalpages.tds.net/~rcsilk wrote:
> With a laptop
>> screen running over $2000.oo for the high-end units, I'm willing to bet
>> that the faster the power goes off, the longer it's going to last.
>>
> LCD's do not wear out so it doesn't make a difference.
>
>
>
November 30, 2004 9:23:46 AM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

personalpages.tds.net/~rcsilk wrote:

> I'll buy that, as long as the word "theoretically" is inserted... :-)
> still, I had an onsite tech inform me that there is a bulb of sorts
> involved on some types of laptop screens, so -- in that case, it's better
> to play it safe if you don't know *exactly* what type of screen you have.
>
LCD's do not wear out. There is a bulb for the backlight on all LCD screens
which can wear out after about 4-5 years of constant use and costs about
$10 for a replacement. Most people will buy a newer bigger monitor before
then and those of us who do keep them longer are usually handy enough with
a screwdriver and $4.99 soldering iron to replace the bulb. All LCD's
have to have a bulb for the backlight not just some so there isn't any
knowing which type you have, they all have it.
Anonymous
November 30, 2004 10:02:11 PM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

"Eugene" <nospam@columbus.rr.com> wrote
> LCD's do not wear out. There is a bulb for the backlight on all LCD
> screens
> which can wear out after about 4-5 years of constant use and costs about
> $10 for a replacement. Most people will buy a newer bigger monitor before
> then and those of us who do keep them longer are usually handy enough with
> a screwdriver and $4.99 soldering iron to replace the bulb. All LCD's
> have to have a bulb for the backlight not just some so there isn't any
> knowing which type you have, they all have it.

In that case, it would definitely be better for the backlight bulb to have
the screen turn off within a reasonable amount of time.
yes, there are lots of posters (writers) here who know how to use a
screwdriver, but the original question seemed to have been asked by a
layperson who would be lost if even asked to use a system restore CD. Thus,
I stand by my original answer that shutting down the screen is a good idea,
if only to preserve the bulb life, not to mention general electrical
conservation. The drop in the ocean that one person's laptop represents can
add up to a small lake if everyone were to practice electrical conservation.
Actually, computers are (in general) one of the worst wasters of electricity
as not all companies have their networks setup for timed standby or
hibernation usage.

Dick Silk -- The Computer Tutor
http://personalpages.tds.net/~rcsilk
for rates and online chat

- MONEY TALKS... but all mine ever says is GOODBYE!
December 1, 2004 1:02:23 AM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

personalpages.tds.net/~rcsilk wrote:

> "Eugene" <nospam@columbus.rr.com> wrote
>> LCD's do not wear out. There is a bulb for the backlight on all LCD
>> screens
>> which can wear out after about 4-5 years of constant use and costs about
>> $10 for a replacement. Most people will buy a newer bigger monitor
>> before then and those of us who do keep them longer are usually handy
>> enough with
>> a screwdriver and $4.99 soldering iron to replace the bulb. All LCD's
>> have to have a bulb for the backlight not just some so there isn't any
>> knowing which type you have, they all have it.
>
> In that case, it would definitely be better for the backlight bulb to have
> the screen turn off within a reasonable amount of time.
> yes, there are lots of posters (writers) here who know how to use a
> screwdriver, but the original question seemed to have been asked by a
> layperson who would be lost if even asked to use a system restore CD.
> Thus, I stand by my original answer that shutting down the screen is a
> good idea, if only to preserve the bulb life, not to mention general
> electrical
> conservation. The drop in the ocean that one person's laptop represents
> can add up to a small lake if everyone were to practice electrical
> conservation. Actually, computers are (in general) one of the worst
> wasters of electricity as not all companies have their networks setup for
> timed standby or hibernation usage.
>
> Dick Silk -- The Computer Tutor
> http://personalpages.tds.net/~rcsilk
> for rates and online chat
>
> - MONEY TALKS... but all mine ever says is GOODBYE!
The lamp in a LCD backlight is a fluorescent bulb and has over a 5 year
lifespan when used 24x7 so even if you leave it on it will last longer than
the rest of the system unless you keep yours a long time. If your worried
about it just set the power mgmt to blank it after a while.
People normally disable power mgmt on networks because reliability of the
systems is more important than using a bit of electricity. Our company
issued laptops running the worthless OS called XP hang 1 out of 10 times
during a resume. Not all computers are electricity wasters either, My C400
draws less current while compiling a Kernel than the 40W lamp hanging from
the wall above me (verified with my trusty simpson 260).
Over the years I have seen more damage done to systems from turning them off
an on a couple times a day so I started a long time ago leaving mine on.
The last hardware failure I had was just last year on an old 233MHz system.
Last time I went to a movie there was one of those ads before the previews
started telling how much energy would be saved every year if people
unplugged their TV's. Problem is they don't realize that modern TV's use
power all the time to keep the tube on and warmed up and thats why they
last longer than 3 years now so if everyone started unplugging their TV's
then we would have landfills full of dead TV's. My Magnavox from 1991 is
still working fine, sure it would be nice to have a new flat panel LCD tv
but I would have to replace my perfectly good TV and tv stand/printer table
which would be more wasteful than the electricity it uses.
!