Sign in with
Sign up | Sign in
Your question
Closed

Folder permissions - I want to do what I want with my files!

Last response: in Windows 7
Share
June 6, 2010 9:18:11 PM

How can I reorganize / read / write / move / unlock and basically do whatever the heck I want with my files and folders in Win7? It is my computer, I am the only user, and yet when I create a folder, the stupid Windows locks it and won't let me save stuff in the folder, or access stuff in the folder, etc, etc.

What do I have to do to get back control of my computer?

Bill Gates I hate you!!!!!!!!!
a b $ Windows 7
June 6, 2010 11:17:16 PM

Go to control panel, Action Center, Change User Account Control Settings and select your options.
Score
0
June 6, 2010 11:51:52 PM

Don't people recommend NOT to turn this off?

And besides, even if I turn it off ... it's not the 'messages' about changes that I'm concerned with. Even if I turn off the messages and warnings, I don't think that's going to allow me to make a new folder and then save something inside it.

Thanks, but I just don't think that answer will do what I'm looking for.
Score
0
Related resources
a b $ Windows 7
June 7, 2010 1:10:56 AM

Are you set up as the administrator on your computer? What anti virus software do you have?

Jessica
Microsoft Windows Client Team
Score
0
a c 215 $ Windows 7
June 7, 2010 4:08:44 AM

jneedler said:
How can I roganize / read / write / move / unlock and basically do whatever the heck I want with my files and folders in Win7? It is my computer, I am the only user, and yet when I create a folder, the stupid Windows locks it and won't let me save stuff in the folder, or access stuff in the folder, etc, etc.

What do I have to do to get back control of my computer?

Bill Gates I hate you!!!!!!!!!


So, exactly what files or folders are you trying to manipulate here? I'm running Windows 7 with UAC on and I'm not having problems manipulating any of the files on my system.

Oh, and Bill Gates sends his love.
Score
0
June 7, 2010 4:44:21 AM

I opened Windows Explorer, navigated to the folder "program files (x86)" on the C drive, and made a folder called "Games", where I thought I could dump all the games I want to add (silly me). I tried to download a game, and the folder "Games" that I had just created, was locked and I was not allowed to write in it.

This has happened before with other folders that I have made. I want to be able to make folders and organize things (even move existing system folders) so I can find them easier. Crazy, I know! But I figured I paid for the stupid system ... I ought to be able to organize it how I want, right?

Bill Gates can bleeepty bleeep my bleeeping bleeeeeeeeeeeeepp!
Score
0
a c 215 $ Windows 7
June 7, 2010 4:55:05 AM

If you're having problems with a folder that you created, I suggest you do as jonmor said above and try turning UAC off. Even if you don't think it will help, try it anyway. You might be surprised.

Regarding organizing the folder structure as you see fit, what happens if you accidentally move the system32 folder under the Windows directory into C:\Windows\system? With a flaky mouse or over-sensitive laptop touchpad, it's certainly possible, and the end result is a computer that's unable to boot and very annoying to sort out. If you're referring strictly to user created folders, I see your point, but accidents like I mentioned above can and do happen. And if it happened to you, you wouldn't be so inclined to censor those choice words you have for Bill Gates.
Score
0
June 7, 2010 1:28:16 PM

JessicaD said:
Are you set up as the administrator on your computer? What anti virus software do you have?

Jessica
Microsoft Windows Client Team


Jessica - I have McAfee and Symantec virus and firewall. I suppose it would be possible that some kind of virus hitched a ride on the thumbdrive I used to install them, but I got them off the internet using a Mac, so I don't see that as very likely (used a Mac to download both programs off the internet and loaded them on my computer before connecting to the net).

I believe that I am an administrator (I'm sure I would have set it up that way if the install gave me an option, but I don't recall) - but I looked for User Accounts in the control panel and it wasn't there. =/ I'm still trying to learn Windows 7 (only had it for a few days, and after work I don't get much time on my computer), so you'll have to bear with me as I re-learn everything on Windows.

Regardign User Account Control - it doesn't just keep ME froming moving / changing stuff, it keeps other programs (even viruses and malware) from doing the same thing, right? I'm just trying to make sure I understand all of the implications before I possibly make my computer vulnerable to stuff.

Thanks everyone for the time and replies!
Score
0
a c 215 $ Windows 7
June 7, 2010 2:11:21 PM

jneedler said:
Regardign User Account Control - it doesn't just keep ME froming moving / changing stuff, it keeps other programs (even viruses and malware) from doing the same thing, right? I'm just trying to make sure I understand all of the implications before I possibly make my computer vulnerable to stuff.


Basically, yes. UAC will stop malware from doing the same thing without your approval. Though I must point out that the idea behind UAC was not just for the security benefit, but also to make people stop and think about what they are doing on their computer, rather than blindly clicking Yes or OK on every single dialog box they are presented with.

I'm not specifically targeting you when I say this jneedler, but 90% of all computer "problems" (viruses included) are actually user error. If people didn't have such an itchy trigger finger, the online world would be a much safer place, and I would probably be out of a job.
Score
0
June 7, 2010 4:44:35 PM

jneedler said:
Jessica - I have McAfee and Symantec virus and firewall. I suppose it would be possible that some kind of virus hitched a ride on the thumbdrive I used to install them, but I got them off the internet using a Mac, so I don't see that as very likely (used a Mac to download both programs off the internet and loaded them on my computer before connecting to the net).

I believe that I am an administrator (I'm sure I would have set it up that way if the install gave me an option, but I don't recall) - but I looked for User Accounts in the control panel and it wasn't there. =/ I'm still trying to learn Windows 7 (only had it for a few days, and after work I don't get much time on my computer), so you'll have to bear with me as I re-learn everything on Windows.

Regardign User Account Control - it doesn't just keep ME froming moving / changing stuff, it keeps other programs (even viruses and malware) from doing the same thing, right? I'm just trying to make sure I understand all of the implications before I possibly make my computer vulnerable to stuff.

Thanks everyone for the time and replies!


1) be careful with what you download. There are less viruses for mac because there are less Macs out there. But if you downloaded anything that contained a virus in the, it doesn't matter how you downloaded it, the virus would be there

2) Put your "Games" folder in the folder with your User name under "Users". You should have full control over it there.
Indeed you paid for a license to use the Software (you don't own it, but I don't want to go there), but there are safeguards built into it to avoid that you make your system unusable or unstable as The_Prophecy stated.

3) I would not turn off UAC.
Score
0
June 8, 2010 4:40:38 AM

jneedler said:
I believe that I am an administrator (I'm sure I would have set it up that way if the install gave me an option, but I don't recall) - but I looked for User Accounts in the control panel and it wasn't there. =/ I'm still trying to learn Windows 7 (only had it for a few days, and after work I don't get much time on my computer), so you'll have to bear with me as I re-learn everything on Windows.


Ummm .... wow. Either I was really in a HUGE hurry when I checked the control panel, or I was half asleep, or I'm just an idiot (you choose). Anyway, I found the User Accounts, and yes I am an administrator, and the only user on the computer.

The programs I downloaded were direct copies of the software off of a trusted site, so I have no doubts about the files I downloaded. I am sure it would have been possible for something to piggyback unseen on the thumbdrive, but I just don't think that's as likely.

Soooo ..... nobody know how I can add a folder to "Program Files" and then put files in that folder? Let alone actually rearranging some of the current file structures that make no sense to me. I'm sure it took a real 'genius-iac' to come up with the folders "Program Files" and "Program Files (x86)".

So far I've seen suggested:
a) turn off UAC, or
b) put the folder in Users

Option A is strongly anti-recommended by several people (not just in this thread, but others I've read)
Option B is .... well, an option, but I know myself, and I will forget because that makes no sense, and then I won't know where to find it ... just being honest. When I look for Programs I have saved I will expect to find them in, oh, I don't know ... maybe the Programs Folder? I just don't think that is too much to ask when I actually paid for Windows, instead of opting for the much cheaper (free stolen) version.

Score
0
a c 215 $ Windows 7
June 8, 2010 5:37:10 AM

Just to be clear about the UAC suggestion... turn it off temporarily to see if that is causing the problem. If it's not the culprit, turn it back on. Then tell us what happened so we stop asking you to turn it off.
Score
0
June 8, 2010 4:31:04 PM

jneedler, I missed that you are talking about where programs install, is that correct?
Well, 64 bit programs will install under c:\Program Files and 32 bits under c:\Program Files (x86) by default. Many programs ask you where you want to install them and then you can change it. If you try to move them after installation, they almost for sure won't work anymore.

if you want to change the default location for programs to install you have to do a registry change: http://www.sevenforums.com/tutorials/39689-program-file...

Please backup your registry first and if you are not comfortable making registry changes I wouldn't do it. You can end up with a very expensive paperweight... :) 
Score
0
June 9, 2010 1:42:35 AM

The_Prophecy said:
Just to be clear about the UAC suggestion... turn it off temporarily to see if that is causing the problem. If it's not the culprit, turn it back on. Then tell us what happened so we stop asking you to turn it off.


Well, turning off UAC worked. So, now what? Do I just leave it off, or turn it on and then have to turn it on/off everytime I want to save something in Program Files?
Score
0
a c 215 $ Windows 7
June 9, 2010 2:42:56 AM

Interesting.... so just to make sure I'm clear on this, turning UAC on will not let you manipulate any files in the Program Files directory at all? Or does it prompt you to allow the change first?

Now it should darken the screen when the prompt appears, but if the cursor focus moves from the Explorer window before the prompt shows up, the screen does seem to stay lit, and the prompt only shows up on the task bar. Once you click on it (look for the shield icon in the task bar), does the screen then darken and present you with the prompt?

If not, and it's simply locking you out, you can always leave UAC off. Doing so won't directly make your system less secure, you just have to be more careful about your computing habits.
Score
0
June 16, 2010 3:41:32 AM

Turning on UAC will not let me save files to a folder that I created in the Program Files folder. I didn't try moving stuff that was already in it. No prompt, no option ... won't allow it. The screen does not darken.
Score
0
a c 209 $ Windows 7
June 16, 2010 5:09:35 AM

What program are you running that doesn't let you save files?

Remember that the purpose of UAC is to REMOVE administrative privileges from your session until a program specifically needs them. Then you get prompted so that you know some program is trying to do something out of the ordinary.

Not all programs are smart enough to ask for privileges - the ones that aren't won't be able to save to admin-protected folders. To get them to work you'll have to start them by right-clicking and choosing "Run As Administrator".

As an example, with UAC turned on, a Command Prompt or PowerShell window will never have admin privileges unless you start them using "Run As Administrator".
Score
0
a b $ Windows 7
June 16, 2010 7:31:05 AM

jneedler said:
How can I reorganize / read / write / move / unlock and basically do whatever the heck I want with my files and folders in Win7? It is my computer, I am the only user, and yet when I create a folder, the stupid Windows locks it and won't let me save stuff in the folder, or access stuff in the folder, etc, etc.

What do I have to do to get back control of my computer?

Bill Gates I hate you!!!!!!!!!

Try the following:

1. Create the folder.
2. Right-click, select "Properties" then select the "Security" tab.
3. Click "Advanced" then click "Change Permissions".
4. Untick "Include inherited permissions..." and click "Remove" in the resulting dialog.
5. Click "OK". Keep clicking "OK" to close all dialogs. Ignore any warnings.
6. Follow the same procedure to open the "Security" tag and click "Continue".
7. Click "Add" and type "SYSTEM" as the object name. Click "OK".
8. Tick "Full control" and click "OK". Ignore the warning (just keep clicking "Continue" till it goes away).
9. Repeat the procedure to give full control to "Administrators" and to your username.
10. Click "OK" to close the "Properties" dialog.

You should now be able to create, copy, delete, save, etc. files to this folder without any warnings.

Needless to say, you should take great care to do this only with the folder that you have created. Messing with the permissions of any system folders could leave you with an unbootable system. The real answer is to not create user folders within system folders.
Score
0
June 25, 2010 4:58:53 AM

Ijack said:
Try the following:

1. Create the folder.
2. Right-click, select "Properties" then select the "Security" tab.
3. Click "Advanced" then click "Change Permissions".
4. Untick "Include inherited permissions..." and click "Remove" in the resulting dialog.


Well, tried but that (#4) is not an option for me. I have Windows 7 if that makes a difference (not sure which system you were referencing).

Still can't make folders and write to them - tried to install iTunes today and couldn't put it in the folder "iTunes" that I created in the "Program Files" folder.

Still not sure why Microsoft thinks they know better than me what folders or programs I want to put where on my computer. Might as well build cars and make them all red because that's what the owner of the factory likes. Maybe it's time to convert to one of those 'other' OS like a Mac, or some version of Linux, or something .... having Windows is useless if I can't do what I want to do with it. It's not like I'm trying to hack into the CIA or anything crazy, just want to be able to make folders and then put stuff in them. Earth shattering, really, I know ....
Score
0
a b $ Windows 7
June 25, 2010 6:24:59 AM

jneedler said:
Well, tried but that (#4) is not an option for me. I have Windows 7 if that makes a difference (not sure which system you were referencing).

I tested this on a Windows 7 system. Option #4 should be available if you are signed on with an Administrator account. If not (I presume you mean the option is greyed out?) then it's something to do with your setup rather than Windows 7 per se.

Obviously you won't be able to do this if you don't have Administrator access to your PC, but that's as it should be.

As to your analogy to cars, I think it would be more accurate to say "might as well say that I can't put the oil in the petrol tank if I want to". There are good reasons to protect some folders from normal user intervention.
Score
0
February 7, 2013 7:47:19 PM

jneedler said:
How can I reorganize / read / write / move / unlock and basically do whatever the heck I want with my files and folders in Win7? It is my computer, I am the only user, and yet when I create a folder, the stupid Windows locks it and won't let me save stuff in the folder, or access stuff in the folder, etc, etc.

What do I have to do to get back control of my computer?

Bill Gates I hate you!!!!!!!!!


I have a similar problem on many files and folders in Windows 7. I do not know the solution; however, I have been working on it for a week and have an opinion. The basic default in Windows 7 assigns ownership to Trusted Installer. This default must be changed to my user account, but I do not know how to do that. Otherwise many NTFS permissions have to be changed manually, and sometimes I cannot do that. The Trusted Installer default was given to me intentionally, free of charge. It is a security feature that protects me from viruses, malware, etc., that might take over my computer. It is so good that it protects me from myself. Unfortunately it does not protect me from Windows 7. Fortunately I remember that Big Brother knows what is best for me. :( 
Score
0
May 14, 2013 11:21:32 PM

Don't know if this helps but I couldn't figure out one time why I couldn't delete a file or write to it, change the name or anything and kept asking me to contact the administrator who created it. I was in the admin account and even also logged into the hidden admin account with the same result. Then figured out finally that it was a shared folder in the Public directory and when I went to the originating directory location I had no problems. May be a simple rookie type mistake that I shouldn't have made but I don't remember anything apparent reminding me that it was is essence, not a shortcut and didn't even act like a shortcut but was more like a pointer to the original file that did not have all the same access ability.
Score
0
May 22, 2013 3:36:25 PM

I have tried these free applications: NTFS PermissionsTools(x64) from DBC Studio and MoveOnBoot from EMCO. NTFS does give permission to me! MoveOnBoot deletes many third party programs, but no help with Trusted Installer.
Score
0
October 6, 2013 8:25:52 AM

This is not a true solution to this problem, it is just a workaround:

I had a similar file-save problem on a friend's Win7 system after an older 32-bit program, Sidekick 98, had been installed, without complaints, in the x86 folder.

It was unable to save any of the changes/additions to its Contacts, but there were no error messages saying that the data was not saved; the saved data just wasn't there when we closed & reopened the program and went back to check it.

I was able to do a quick 'fix' to get his contact database useable for him by uninstalling that program then reinstalling it in the root of C:. That allowed the data saves, but there must be an easy fix to allow saves by just this program, installed in the x86 folder, without compromising the system's security.
Score
0
February 17, 2014 1:15:22 PM

wallyinnc said:
jneedler said:
Jessica - I have McAfee and Symantec virus and firewall. I suppose it would be possible that some kind of virus hitched a ride on the thumbdrive I used to install them, but I got them off the internet using a Mac, so I don't see that as very likely (used a Mac to download both programs off the internet and loaded them on my computer before connecting to the net).

I believe that I am an administrator (I'm sure I would have set it up that way if the install gave me an option, but I don't recall) - but I looked for User Accounts in the control panel and it wasn't there. =/ I'm still trying to learn Windows 7 (only had it for a few days, and after work I don't get much time on my computer), so you'll have to bear with me as I re-learn everything on Windows.

Regardign User Account Control - it doesn't just keep ME froming moving / changing stuff, it keeps other programs (even viruses and malware) from doing the same thing, right? I'm just trying to make sure I understand all of the implications before I possibly make my computer vulnerable to stuff.

Thanks everyone for the time and replies!


1) be careful with what you download. There are less viruses for mac because there are less Macs out there. But if you downloaded anything that contained a virus in the, it doesn't matter how you downloaded it, the virus would be there

2) Put your "Games" folder in the folder with your User name under "Users". You should have full control over it there.
Indeed you paid for a license to use the Software (you don't own it, but I don't want to go there), but there are safeguards built into it to avoid that you make your system unusable or unstable as The_Prophecy stated.

3) I would not turn off UAC.


Score
0
February 17, 2014 1:24:51 PM

First of all part of the problem is that you are using to different products for anti-virus as they may conflict with each other and as far as there may be more windows products out there it is because they are much cheaper to purchase and not everybody can afford a mac and the reason there cheaper is because there just not as good as Mac products. When did you ever here of a Mac getting a virus, Windows is an inferior product and much easier to hack and manipulate code, but as others have said I would move the folder to users folder and you should be able to do the things you want
Score
0
February 17, 2014 1:27:08 PM

By the way if you are the only user, you are automatically the Administrator
Score
0
February 23, 2014 8:40:26 AM

jneedler said:
Don't people recommend NOT to turn this off?

And besides, even if I turn it off ... it's not the 'messages' about changes that I'm concerned with. Even if I turn off the messages and warnings, I don't think that's going to allow me to make a new folder and then save something inside it.

Thanks, but I just don't think that answer will do what I'm looking for.


I found AN answer here;
http://superuser.com/questions/204909/cant-delete-folde...
It involves editing a small batch file.
Just in case it is ever taken down, Since it is a quote of a blog that has already been taken down, here is the pertinent answer.
I am not sure why this happens but there is a workaround.

http://blog.bluetoad.net/?p=43

Just in case this user blog is taken down someday I have quoted his/her solution below:

To take control of the folder containing the undeletable create a text file called “delete.bat” and add the following lines to it:

SET DIRECTORY_NAME="C:\Locked Directory"
TAKEOWN /f %DIRECTORY_NAME% /r /d y
ICACLS %DIRECTORY_NAME% /grant administrators:F /t
PAUSE
You will need to change the directory path to match your requirements e.g. “C:\Locked Directory” to “C:\Delete Me”.

Right click on the file “delete.bat” select “Run As Administrator” and you should now have full control of the directory and all sub directories meaning you can do what you wish with them.

share|improve this answer
answered Oct 29 '10 at 17:45

Sahil
67146
Score
0
!