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Hp pavillion dv9000 wont boot up

Last response: in Laptops & Notebooks
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November 25, 2011 8:07:47 PM

Hello,
HP Pavillion dv9000 while accessing the internet, video froze then it rebooted. leds come on for a couple of seconds with the fan, then it tries to restart. 95% of the time there is a black screen but when I did have video it was narrow diagonal lines on a black screen. have torn everything down to the motherboard and blown out the dust. no change.
November 25, 2011 9:40:06 PM

bobbillow said:
Hello,
HP Pavillion dv9000 while accessing the internet, video froze then it rebooted. leds come on for a couple of seconds with the fan, then it tries to restart. 95% of the time there is a black screen but when I did have video it was narrow diagonal lines on a black screen. have torn everything down to the motherboard and blown out the dust. no change.


This is because of a problem with the inadequate cooling for the GPU chipset.
The constant overheating, causes solder connections in the BGA surface mount for the GPU chipset, to partially melt.
This causes poor connections (Solder connections), and what you are dealing with.

1) BGA surface mount:
Compare to an older Intel Pentium 4 processor, and it's Socket 478 processor socket.

The Processor has contact pins on bottom. (478 of 'em)
The processor socket has matching socket holes for the contact pins. (478)

With a BGA surface mount, there are no contact pins, nor socket holes.
Solder Balls take the place of the contact pins on the chipset.
Copper Pads take the place of the socket holes.

The chipset, (In this case a graphics chipset { GPU ), is set into place on the motherboard, with the Solder Balls lining up with the Copper Pads.
Heat is then applied at a specific temperature, and length of time.
The Solder Balls melt, which solders the chipset to the Copper Pads.
(Which in turn solders the chipset to the motherboard)

The Processor, and the GPU, are the two hardware components that put out the most heat.

The cooling system components for the Pavilion dv9000 series of Notebook PC's, is the Cooling Fan Assembly, and Heatsink/Cooling Tube.

The Cooling Tube is a slightly flattened copper tube filled with Nitrogen, and sealed.
At one end are two metal plates attached to the Cooling Tube. One sits on the top of the Processor's case, the other sits on the GPU chipset.

At the opposite end of the Cooling Tube is the Heatsink. Basic construction of a Heatsink is a plate of metal, with tall, thin fins protruding from it. The plate of metal absorbs heat from whatever object it is placed against, and the tall, thin fins absorb heat from the plate. The fins then radiate the heat away.
(With a fan used in conjunction with a Heatsink, the air flow helps carry heat away from the fins)

Heat is absorbed by the plate on top of the Processor, and the plate on top of the GPU chipset, into the Cooling Tube.
Heat is transferred through the Cooling Tube to the Heatsink.

The fins of the Heatsink absorb the heat from the Cooling Tube, and then the fins radiate the heat away.
Air flow from the Fan Assembly helps carry the heat away from the fins of the Heatsink.

The surface area of the plate of metal, (Attached to the Cooling Tube), that sits on the GPU chipset is too Small.
The surface area of the plate of metal, (Attached to the Cooling Tube), that sits on the Processor is barely adequate.

This means that the GPU chipset is constantly overheating, and causing the aforementioned problem above, with the GPU chipset's BGA surface mounting.

P-r-o-p-e-r method of repair is to use a BGA rework machine. (And a S-k-i-l-l-e-d operator )
There are other methods, but repair is non-professional, and sketchy.

(IMHO, the second best method of repair is to use an appropriate thermometer, heat source, shielding for a-r-o-u-n-d the GPU chipset, and proper procedure for applying proper amount, and time of heat, PLUS proper heat range, distance, and length of time when removing heat source )
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