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Downgrade from Windows 7 to Vista

Last response: in Windows 7
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June 8, 2010 4:22:30 AM

Windows 7 is better than Windows XP and Vista. But why people are downgrading from Windows 7 to Vista or XP?

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a b $ Windows 7
June 8, 2010 5:03:33 AM

Windows 7 combines the best features of XP and Vista. I don't believe either of those is superior in any way except perhaps in a few cases where driver support no longer exists.

There were a LOT of problems with Vista which have since been sorted out; Windows 7 was the most secure OS at the time of launch (XP wasn't that great at launch).

There is absolutely no reason (other than ignorance) to purchase a Windows OS other than Windows 7. For 2GB or less of RAM it's best to use the 32-bit version, 3GB or higher the 64-bit version.

On that note, most people need no more than 4GB (and can't even use it so it just makes heat).

Most people should buy the following:
1) Windows 7 Premium 64-bit OEM, and
2) 4GB DDR3 RAM

(RAM bandwidth is rarely the bottleneck, but it's cheap enough to recommend 1600MHz)
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a c 215 $ Windows 7
June 8, 2010 5:38:23 AM

Why end users would be doing this is beyond me (save for a few who have applications that mysteriously won't work under 7, but work fine under Vista. For businesses, that is exactly why they are downgrading. Corporate rollouts aren't simply done by the waving of a magic wand either. Corporate IT is always very cautious about rolling out a new operating system to the rest of the business, because not everything is going to work smoothly in the new environment.
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a b $ Windows 7
June 8, 2010 7:07:40 AM

XP is the better choice for some people. The highest level of software compatibility is still achieved with windows XP. XP is also the equal of Windows 7 minus the bells and whistles. And most of these people already have XP, so they are not spending money on a new OS. And frankly, some people just like the interface better.

I don't know anybody downgrading to Vista. There are few compelling reasons for that.
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June 8, 2010 8:16:09 AM

Some older people may not tolerate the revamped UI of Windows 7. Some older people already have a hard time learning XP, and now you're telling them to re-learn everything again. Unfortunately, what is intuitive to us, might be confusing to someone else.

XP has been for so damn long, almost anyone with a computing device has probably used a PC with XP.
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June 9, 2010 4:24:20 AM

Best answer selected by Ricky_Critic.
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June 10, 2010 12:38:12 AM

Hello ricky_critic,

You cannot downgrade from any higher SKU to a lower one just by using a key. You will need to do a full reformat since there's no option for downgrading, only upgrading (via Windows Anytime Upgrade). You however can still save profiles and settings by using Windows Easy Transfer, but unfortunately, you will need to reinstall all softwares you're using.
Hope this helps.

Thanks,
John M
Microsoft Windows Client Team
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June 10, 2010 4:25:08 AM

I am not downgrading from WIndows 7 to VIsta, I am just getting views why there is requirement for downgrading to Vista.
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September 27, 2012 6:13:12 PM

photonboy said:
Windows 7 combines the best features of XP and Vista. I don't believe either of those is superior in any way except perhaps in a few cases where driver support no longer exists.

There were a LOT of problems with Vista which have since been sorted out; Windows 7 was the most secure OS at the time of launch (XP wasn't that great at launch).

There is absolutely no reason (other than ignorance) to purchase a Windows OS other than Windows 7. For 2GB or less of RAM it's best to use the 32-bit version, 3GB or higher the 64-bit version.



How about the following reasons:

- The clients computer is Windows Xp and will not upgrade - they made their choice
- The client has no budget for any upgrade to better windows
- They expect their computer back exactly the way the left it, just with minor problems fixed

Oh, and since we used a Windows 7 computer to capture the profile, while we reinstalled the clients machine with the only operating system that they're paying us for - Windows XP, that means, THEY WILL get their computer back with Windows XP, and their profile.

Exactly how am I going to put my clients profile back onto their computer, if it is stuck on our service depot laptop? - Normally we use a hard drive, but during the company move, the hard drives where not available.

So what you're saying is that I should purchase Windows 7 for my client, even if they don't want it? even if they refuse to purchase it? even if I can't afford it? What are the impacts now? their network is perfectly geared for Windows XP. Will Windows 7 play nicely with print drivers? shared network folders? the list goes on....

Would it not be.. just a little...criminal? - to force that?

I do service Windows 7 machines, and yes they are better from many angles. Except of course... money. Their Windows OS is free (It's already purchased), the other free option is Linux, and based on their budget its not surprising several companies are moving into the cloud with Linux and Office Libre.

There must be a way to serve the customer.... what are my options?
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