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So read any good books recently

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March 10, 2010 5:06:55 AM

So I was just wondering if any of you had read anything you found immensely interesting recently...

For instance, today I finished reading The Stand by Stephen King.
Long book+Good book= 5 days of entertainment. :D 
March 10, 2010 2:49:34 PM

Terry Pratchett's recent one, as always a good read.
March 10, 2010 2:56:48 PM

Quote:
Quote:
So read any good boods recently


Tried spellcheck recently? lol


Nope i haven't I'll work on that...
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March 11, 2010 8:39:35 PM

I can heartily NOT recommend Dan Brown's latest - The Lost Symbol. First of all, some moron in Sam's Club (where I bought it) ripped out a page in the middle of the book, then put it back & I happened to be the unlucky person buying that copy. But my daughter got a Kindle for Christmas and this was one of the e-books she ordered, so I skimmed over the missing page - didn't add much value to a trite, predictable and ridiculous premise story that I could see.

Spoiler warning...






The "Lost Symbol" turns out to be the Bible, probably King James version, that the Masons buried in the cornerstone of the Washington Monument. I guess after hiding all that accumulated wealth from Egypt & the middle ages in the church on the corner of Wall Street in NYC, as in "National Treasure", them pesky Masons were due for a letdown & all they could come up with was a copy of the Bible to stick under George's pyramid-shaped monument.

Now as to why the Masons would go to all the trouble of creating tons of hints, magic decoder boxes, etc etc etc just to lead to a Bible, is something only they or Dan Brown would know... His work has been steadily declining ever since he wrote The Da Vince Code. I just bought the BD version of Angels & Demons, and while watching the extra features, had to laugh when director Ron Howard said that they had to write out of the script the scene where Prof. Langdon jumps into the helicopter piloted by the Pope wannabe character, to keep the movie believable...
March 11, 2010 8:46:49 PM

^ PS - my office building is about 4 blocks away from the Masonic Temple here in Alexandria, VA, so naturally a buttload of us are somewhat bemused by all things Masonic, at least on our lunch hour :p ..
August 31, 2010 11:17:34 PM

I would recommend Christopher Brookmyre's latest (or any of them really) offering Pandaemonium.

A lot of his books make reference to computers and gaming (Doom seems to be there a lot), and playing music or being in a band and a healthy dose of God and how woeful it can be for some people.

They are crime novels and he is a Scottish author so be prepared to read in an accent!

September 1, 2010 2:15:52 AM

Bit of an old thread, but I'd recommend "The Lost City of Z: A Tale of Deadly Obsession in the Amazon" by David Grann. It's just as it sounds.
September 1, 2010 7:41:41 AM

On Killing, Lt. Col. Dave Grossman, The Psychological Cost of Learning to Kill in War and society.
September 1, 2010 4:31:47 PM

Jefferson's War, America's First War on Terror 1801 - 1805 by Joseph Wheelan.
September 2, 2010 4:54:08 AM

Kafka on the Shore by Haruki Murakami.
September 3, 2010 2:12:43 AM

Like said, I too have read Lost Symbols and though of it as not that great compared to his other books like Angels & Daemons,etc.

I've been reading a bunch of random books from A.C. Clark, and currently reading Rendezvous with Rama. Read Sun Tzu's Art of War translation for like the 10th time a while back.
September 5, 2010 9:58:24 AM

Some books are worth rereading. I reread Samuel Huntington's A Clash of Civilizations every couple years.

My favorite Arthur Clarke short story collection is Tales from the White Hart.
September 5, 2010 4:10:43 PM

It was a good movie, but having just watched the entire extended edition set of Lord of the Rings (again), I've started rereading the trilogy again to re-experience the story "done right." The barrow wights are an important part of the story, and the Scouring of the Shire was one of my favorite chapters. I also much prefer Faramir portrayed as noble from square one.
September 5, 2010 10:46:21 PM

What happened with the shire is the worst part of the movies. Never sure why they changed that other then perhaps time.
September 6, 2010 11:02:29 PM

jsc said:
Some books are worth rereading. I reread Samuel Huntington's A Clash of Civilizations every couple years.

My favorite Arthur Clarke short story collection is Tales from the White Hart.

You should check out:
Guns, Germs & Steel
Collapse (by the same author, J. Diamond)
Moby Dick (If you have never read it or read it a long time ago, read the original text not some of the new "translations")
Art of War (Has any one here read it at all? Many politicians, business men, leaders,etc have claimed to have read it)

I will check out The Clash of Civilizations, seems like a good read.
September 7, 2010 12:48:17 AM

Wow, all you guys appear to be a lot more high brow than myself. My recommendation is filled with fart jokes, murder and dismemberment. Ahh well, each to their own!

EDIT: On the Lord of the Rings book, I tried (and i mean really tried) to read it, but the language was way too complicated for me (I'm no idiot by any means, but my concentration wavers fairly easily), so I found the movies to be a godsend (Heresy! Burn the heathen!) and they did allow me to enjoy Tolkien's world (as i then went on the get the Battle for middle earth series, I found them quite enjoyable.) And Raymond Fiest's trilogy "Mistress of the Empire/Servant of the Empire/Daughter of the Empire" is a very good series (You should read Magician prior, just to give you some background, but is not essential)
September 8, 2010 6:14:38 AM

It took me 4 tries to read the first Rings books. Boring. Nothing much happens in the first half of the book except character introduction. The pacing in the second book is about average. The third book rocks.

That's what I liked about the movies. They didn't suffer from that problem.

Shadow, I am working through Guns, Germ, and Steel. Good content. Don't like Diamond's writing style.

The P.I.G. books (Politically Incorrect Guide to ...) are kind of fun also. I have three: U.S. Constitution, U.S. History, and Islam.

Bill Bryson's A Short History of Nearly Everything is also very good.
September 8, 2010 2:46:50 PM

+1 to bill bryson. He has such great style, he can make you read about anything and enjoy it.
September 8, 2010 8:13:30 PM

Quote:
Don't like Diamond's writing style.

Agreed. But the content is good imo.
September 11, 2010 1:37:44 PM

I tried reading a Harry Potter book. Once. Waded through about 20 pages before I gave it up as a lost cause, despite my then-young daughter's hearty recommendations. So yes the movie versions were a good deal for me as I didn't have to wade through clumsy prose and obscure references, plus I could nod off during the boring parts :p .
September 11, 2010 4:59:57 PM

^ The movie is NOTHING like the book.
September 11, 2010 5:14:38 PM

The Role of Postnatal Growth Pattern in the Production of Facial Morphology. J. K. Rowling. A powerful read involving a collection of sacred scripture of Judaism and Christianity. This is the first tale in the ongoing series picturizing the powerful drama that won the coveted Pulitzer Prize in 1937. The story is set in Clayton County, Georgia and Atlanta, Georgia during the American Civil War and Reconstruction and depicts the experiences of Scarlett O'Hara, the spoiled daughter of a well-to-do plantation owner. The novel is the source of the extremely popular 1939 film of the same name.
September 13, 2010 3:25:04 AM

If you are into natural disaster type novels, I just read "The Rift" by Walter Williams. It is a novel about a massive 8.9 earthquake that hits the American midwest and the resulting anarchy, racism, and other societal oddities that occur in its wake. It is incredibly well researched scientific wise and even though it is roughly 930 pages, it is a fast, exhilarating read.
September 13, 2010 4:06:11 AM

The Origin of Consciousness in the Breakdown of the Bicameral Mind by Dr. Julian Jaynes might be suitable if you are looking for something more intellectual but still very interesting.
How I Found Freedom in an Unfree World by Harry Browne is very relevant to today's "pay the parasites" world, but the mostly off-grid lifestyle he discusses probably would not appeal to many technophiles.
The somewhat older "Psychology of ..." books by Nathaniel Branden may not teach you anything, but will give you the words to go with the thoughts you already have; you'll find yourself thinking "Ah ha, no wonder I feel that way when..."
September 13, 2010 5:16:18 AM

First I have to say I am one of those rare people who actually read. Also I hate that technology is trying to take my paper books away from me. If I want to read a book I want it on paper not on the LCD screen of a mobile device.

If you liked "The Stand" ( one of my all time favorites BTW ) try "The Passage" by Justin Cronin.

Pretty much all Stephen King before the mid 90s is awesome as is some after that but it is not quite as good as the older stuff IMO.
If you can still find his books Robert R. McCammon is amazing with a book called "Swan Song" on a level with "The Stand".

If you like techno thrillers then all of Tom Clancy's books are still great with "Red Storm Rising" being another of my all time favorites. Harold Coyle and Larry Bond are also good.

If you like high fantasy then the "A Song Of Ice and Fire" series by George R.R. Martin is god tier.
Also Terry Goodkind's books although they get a bit preachy and Robert Jordan's and ( after he died) Brandan Sanderson's "Wheel Of Time" are all great.
Refugeesus mentioned Raymond E. Feist but you really have to read them in order to really get the most from his books. He has long been a favorite.
September 13, 2010 6:17:33 AM



I'm a published author too. For my next book, I'm thinking of a Zane Gray type spaghetti western with a Pam Anderson-like heroine posing as a cleverly implanted hat-held-high-aganist-her-chest former dance hall bouncer forced to go back to her centerfold days where she brought about law and order by causing even the most hardened cowboys to take up an interest in reading.
September 13, 2010 8:34:58 PM

buwish said:
If you are into natural disaster type novels, I just read "The Rift" by Walter Williams. It is a novel about a massive 8.9 earthquake that hits the American midwest and the resulting anarchy, racism, and other societal oddities that occur in its wake. It is incredibly well researched scientific wise and even though it is roughly 930 pages, it is a fast, exhilarating read.

If you liked that, consider reading "Richter 10" by A. C. Clerk.
September 13, 2010 11:06:44 PM

chedderslam1976 said:
I enjoyed Dean Koontz's "A Big Little Life". You can read my mom's review.


Hmm, I liked his The Bad Place and a few other stories, but he seems pretty formulaic nowadays, with good plot ideas few and far-between. Guess success spoiled him. but I haven't read anything new by him in a few years now - he seems to pump 'em out quickly.
September 13, 2010 11:09:06 PM

badge said:
I'm a published author too. For my next book, I'm thinking of a Zane Gray type spaghetti western with a Pam Anderson-like heroine posing as a cleverly implanted hat-held-high-aganist-her-chest former dance hall bouncer forced to go back to her centerfold days where she brought about law and order by causing even the most hardened cowboys to take up an interest in reading.


LOL - just don't put her in any gunfights - she has a couple large impediments to a quick draw :p .

Or maybe write her with a couple of bra-machineguns, like in the old Redneck Rampage games :D .
September 14, 2010 3:22:01 AM

Quote:
LOL - just don't put her in any gunfights - she has a couple large impediments to a quick draw


Didn't stop Laura Croft.
September 14, 2010 3:28:42 AM

badge said:
LOL. I was just thinking about this thread and my mail box got your 'hit'. There some useful entry's so far. But, I wanted to suggest 'today's literary best selection'.

http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0867196041?ie=UTF8&tag...



LOL I am not sure if I should laugh or cry on this one.
Even better is here: What Do Customers Ultimately Buy After Viewing This Item?
http://www.amazon.com/Big-Coloring-Book-Vaginas/dp/B000... I sure didn't have this one as a kid! :heink: 
September 14, 2010 9:59:53 AM

Lol, some people have too much time on their hands.
September 20, 2010 9:09:29 PM

I got an Author for you to try. Lee Child. read the, "a Reacher novel" by him there are a few. they are great. check out books by the co-authers, Douglas Preston and Lincoln Child. you will LOVE there stuff, all the books are stand alone story's but they do sutly relate. you can read them in any order, Try starting with the book called, Brimstone.
have a good night
Steadfast1984
September 22, 2010 10:38:28 PM

anort3 said:
Also Terry Goodkind's books although they get a bit preachy...


I whole heartedly agree, they are a good read, however avoid "The rule of nines", because...
Spoiler
it does mix with the Sword Of Truth series, but in a lame Richard meets Kahlan kind of way.


I still thoroughly endorse Christopher Brookmyre and his American counterpart, Carl Hiassen (remember that crap movie with Demi Moore, Striptease? Well he wrote the book and it was funny, unlike the movie).
September 23, 2010 4:48:59 AM

Lieutenant JAK said:
So I was just wondering if any of you had read anything you found immensely interesting recently...

For instance, today I finished reading The Stand by Stephen King.
Long book+Good book= 5 days of entertainment. :D 


boobs? Oh boods. No I haven't read any boobs lately, but I've been using my wife's for a pillow.

The Stand remains one of my all time favorites. I haven't read it in about 10 years or so, maybe I'll pick it up again as I can't remember all the details but I do remember that was one amazing book.
September 23, 2010 8:20:23 AM

The Stand is good. I also liked Swan Song.

Those books were the first books I ever read on that scale. Also, Battlefield Earth- and don't be put off by the Scientology connection.
September 23, 2010 8:27:58 AM

A book for our times: Ayn Rand's The Fountainhead.
September 23, 2010 8:49:30 AM

Never read. Got done with Atlas Shrugged and said never again will I read one of her books. Powerful point, but needs to learn how to edit herself...
September 23, 2010 5:01:37 PM

Would have been awesome if you wrote "boobs"...

Check out "Let The Right One In". Amazing book and movie.
September 24, 2010 12:46:49 AM

I just finished nemesis, by isaac asimov, love that man's write, read the first 5 foundation books about 7 times each.
September 24, 2010 9:32:01 AM

I liked Nemesis too.
"Alternaties" was also interesting.
September 24, 2010 9:42:29 AM

Isaac Asimov, like George Herbert and his Dune books, should have stopped at three.
September 24, 2010 12:29:21 PM

The Count of Monte Cristo. It's a classic and if you have not read it, please do so, also, it's one of the best movies i have seen! (with Jim Caviezel & Guy Pierce and that insanely hot French chick)
September 24, 2010 10:37:23 PM

jsc said:
Isaac Asimov, like George Herbert and his Dune books, should have stopped at three.


Yeah, I tend to agree. While Foundation, Foundation & Empire, and Second Foundation were pretty good (still waiting for those atomic ashtrays that distintegrate stuff dropped in them down to their atoms), the pre-prequels & se-sequels left something to be desired, esp. when he tried to harmonize the I, Robot universe with the Foundation universe. IIRC Daneel Olivaw (original robot) turned out to be the 2nd Foundation mastermind, steering humanity on its ultimate course based on the zeroth law. If he had included any hint of that in either of the original series, it would have come off much better.

He was my second favorite classic sci-fi author, after Arthur C. Clarke. While Asimov told his stories mainly through character interactions & dialog, Clarke could paint you a picture and immerse you headfirst into his alien worlds through sheer imagery.

However Asimov's Nightfall, End of Eternity, The Gods Themselves and I forget the title of what I believe is one of the shortest sci-fi short stories ever (where as the last star in the universe burns out, the final human programs the ultimate computer to reverse entropy, the computer computes for endless millenia and then finally outputs "Let there be light!"), arguably place him as #1.

And Robert Heinlein (before he started writing about sex with his mother) was excellent too, particularly the time-travel story where the protagonist meets himself about half a dozen times, beating himself up several times, etc..

On a more recent note, I can recommend the Gaea trilogy by John Varley - Titan, Wizard & Demon.
September 26, 2010 7:50:45 AM

I like the Helliconia Trilogy, but some of it's boring. Still, something about the story just blew my mind. Sci Fi FTW!
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