Refresh rate problem with Dell monitor M993S

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

I just got a new Dell, with 19" CRT M993s monitor. The only refresh rate
which seems to work is 60 Hz, which is strange since the recommended setting
in the documentation is at least 75 Hz. Anything greater than 60 results in
a shaky, jittery screen. My video card is the GeForce 6800 GTO 256 MB. Any
ideas?
11 answers Last reply
More about refresh rate problem dell monitor m993s
  1. Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

    does windows xp show your monitor? or is it a default monitor...or plug n
    play?

    you will need also to have the correct driver for your monitor...

    it would seem if you just got a NEW Dell...it would show up Swell...

    LOL
    tony
    "medgirl" <medgirl2001@nospamhotmail.com> wrote in message
    news:BLKdnQKZd5igyCvcRVn-sw@giganews.com...
    >I just got a new Dell, with 19" CRT M993s monitor. The only refresh rate
    >which seems to work is 60 Hz, which is strange since the recommended
    >setting in the documentation is at least 75 Hz. Anything greater than 60
    >results in a shaky, jittery screen. My video card is the GeForce 6800 GTO
    >256 MB. Any ideas?
    >
  2. Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

    Are you using the correct driver for your video card?

    Ted Zieglar

    "medgirl" <medgirl2001@nospamhotmail.com> wrote in message
    news:BLKdnQKZd5igyCvcRVn-sw@giganews.com...
    >I just got a new Dell, with 19" CRT M993s monitor. The only refresh rate
    >which seems to work is 60 Hz, which is strange since the recommended
    >setting in the documentation is at least 75 Hz. Anything greater than 60
    >results in a shaky, jittery screen. My video card is the GeForce 6800 GTO
    >256 MB. Any ideas?
    >
  3. Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

    "Ted Zieglar" <teddyz@notmail.com> wrote in message
    > Are you using the correct driver for your video card?
    >
    > Ted Zieglar

    I believe so. I tried updating the driver with the one on the Dell website
    today, but with no improvement in the situation.
  4. Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

    Obtain the latest driver from the video card maker. Follow their
    installation instructions very carefully.

    Ted Zieglar

    "medgirl" <medgirl2001@nospamhotmail.com> wrote in message
    news:N9Cdnckh5_8bwSvcRVn-sw@giganews.com...
    > "Ted Zieglar" <teddyz@notmail.com> wrote in message
    >> Are you using the correct driver for your video card?
    >>
    >> Ted Zieglar
    >
    > I believe so. I tried updating the driver with the one on the Dell
    > website today, but with no improvement in the situation.
    >
  5. Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

    "tonys" <aarcuda@cox.net.spam> wrote in message
    news:fWutd.207072$G15.171482@fed1read03...
    > does windows xp show your monitor? or is it a default monitor...or plug n
    > play?
    >
    > you will need also to have the correct driver for your monitor...
    >
    > it would seem if you just got a NEW Dell...it would show up Swell...

    It initially showed up as "Plug and Play Monitor." I installed the monitor
    driver from the disk it came with and it now shows up as M993S, but no
    change.

    m
  6. Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

    "Ted Zieglar" <teddyz@notmail.com> wrote in message
    news:4ZOdnaQXE46r_SvcRVn-pA@comcast.com...
    > Obtain the latest driver from the video card maker. Follow their
    > installation instructions very carefully.

    Is it all right to use the nVidia drivers from the web site rather than that
    on Dell's site? Or is there some difference with the OEM drivers?

    m
  7. Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

    Hi!

    The first thing to do is to try another monitor. While a video card could
    cause this (and I've seen them do so) it is far more often the monitor
    that's the problem.

    If the problem is as bad as it sounds, even a small 14 or 15 inch display in
    good working order would let you know where the problem was.

    William
  8. Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

    On Wed, 8 Dec 2004 18:41:05 -0500, "medgirl"
    <medgirl2001@nospamhotmail.com> wrote:

    >"Ted Zieglar" <teddyz@notmail.com> wrote in message
    >news:4ZOdnaQXE46r_SvcRVn-pA@comcast.com...
    >> Obtain the latest driver from the video card maker. Follow their
    >> installation instructions very carefully.
    >
    >Is it all right to use the nVidia drivers from the web site rather than that
    >on Dell's site? Or is there some difference with the OEM drivers?
    >
    >m
    >

    Yes, you can use the latest drivers from nVidia. I'd stay away from
    any beta they might have though. The Dell site is always way behind
    on the video drivers. If you don't like i, you can always roll back.
    Dave
  9. Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

    "William R. Walsh" <newsgroups1@saveyourspam.walshcomptech.com> wrote in
    message news:WaOtd.536608$D%.448048@attbi_s51...
    > Hi!
    >
    > The first thing to do is to try another monitor. While a video card could
    > cause this (and I've seen them do so) it is far more often the monitor
    > that's the problem.
    >
    > If the problem is as bad as it sounds, even a small 14 or 15 inch display
    > in
    > good working order would let you know where the problem was.

    All right - I've identified the problem at last, but I would appreciate any
    suggestions as to how to solve it. I finally moved the monitor, computer,
    mouse, keyboard, and surge protector to another room, where everything
    worked perfectly (I should have tried this to start with). Then we tried
    hooking the computer up with an extension cord to the same plug we had been
    using before and, again, everything worked perfectly at all refresh rates.
    Incidentally, the image is much nicer at refresh rates of about 75 Hz or
    higher. I can definitely tell a difference in comparison to the 60 Hz,
    though, honestly, I can't distinguish much difference at >75 Hz. Anyway,
    the problem is clearly something about the location of the computer, but
    it's a daunting task to try to imagine what specifically is doing this. Any
    ideas as to the most likely culprits? Is there any way to shield the
    monitor from other frequencies?
  10. Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

    Halogen light or subwoofer to close?

    "medgirl" <medgirl2001@nospamhotmail.com> wrote in message
    news:7ZCdnSCJeqJOWFjcRVn-jg@giganews.com...
    > "William R. Walsh" <newsgroups1@saveyourspam.walshcomptech.com> wrote in
    > message news:WaOtd.536608$D%.448048@attbi_s51...
    >> Hi!
    >>
    >> The first thing to do is to try another monitor. While a video card could
    >> cause this (and I've seen them do so) it is far more often the monitor
    >> that's the problem.
    >>
    >> If the problem is as bad as it sounds, even a small 14 or 15 inch display
    >> in
    >> good working order would let you know where the problem was.
    >
    > All right - I've identified the problem at last, but I would appreciate
    > any suggestions as to how to solve it. I finally moved the monitor,
    > computer, mouse, keyboard, and surge protector to another room, where
    > everything worked perfectly (I should have tried this to start with).
    > Then we tried hooking the computer up with an extension cord to the same
    > plug we had been using before and, again, everything worked perfectly at
    > all refresh rates. Incidentally, the image is much nicer at refresh rates
    > of about 75 Hz or higher. I can definitely tell a difference in
    > comparison to the 60 Hz, though, honestly, I can't distinguish much
    > difference at >75 Hz. Anyway, the problem is clearly something about the
    > location of the computer, but it's a daunting task to try to imagine what
    > specifically is doing this. Any ideas as to the most likely culprits? Is
    > there any way to shield the monitor from other frequencies?
    >
  11. Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

    Some years ago, the pretty face news anchors (who did not do
    their job) would report high EM fields may have caused cancer
    in kids. So they showed a high voltage transmission line.
    Nonsense. What they never told us: sources of those strong
    fields are, instead, in wires behind walls and floor. If kids
    were being threatened by electric fields, then those dangers
    would be the same EM fields that are causing your monitor
    problem.

    The solutions is not easy. Either shield those wires from
    your system or move your system. IOW first locate those wires
    behind walls, floors, etc. Not every wire. Many wires, such
    as those to wall receptacles, carry trivial currents. Where
    are wires to large current consumers such as electric heat,
    stove, electric hot water, etc? Only then are you ready to
    address a solution. BTW such low frequency field problems are
    not trivial.

    Monitor is a victim of EM fields. What is the source of
    those fields? Other field generating devices could be the
    source such as a defective fluorescent ballast. But a most
    likely source is high current wires that may also travel
    underneath a bedroom bed (so why did that pretty faced anchor
    not mention those wires) or be grouped with numerous other
    wires traveling up wall into attic.

    medgirl wrote:
    > All right - I've identified the problem at last, but I would
    > appreciate any suggestions as to how to solve it. I finally moved
    > the monitor, computer, mouse, keyboard, and surge protector to
    > another room, where everything worked perfectly (I should have tried
    > this to start with). Then we tried hooking the computer up with an
    > extension cord to the same plug we had been using before and, again,
    > everything worked perfectly at all refresh rates.
    > Incidentally, the image is much nicer at refresh rates of about 75 Hz
    > or higher. I can definitely tell a difference in comparison to the
    > 60 Hz, though, honestly, I can't distinguish much difference at >75
    > Hz. Anyway, the problem is clearly something about the location of
    > the computer, but it's a daunting task to try to imagine what
    > specifically is doing this. Any ideas as to the most likely
    > culprits? Is there any way to shield the monitor from other
    > frequencies?
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