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Does your undergrad matter?

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Last response: in Work & Education
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February 8, 2013 2:56:17 PM

Okay, so my friend and I got into a little debate about a certain subject matter:

Colleges.

We were discussing the various colleges in our Midwest town and the different rankings. The issue? Well we were discussing whether or not your undergrad school mattered. I'm not talking about a Sanford Brown or Everest for-profit-school. Just a regular non-profit.

My take is that, they matter in someways. But I think it depends on where you go. I don't think that it's such a major deal if you yourself workhard in that school and figure out what you ultimately want to do. I think that unless you are in the top Ivy League or 30 schools, then it does not matter.

He feels that no matter what, the name matters. The name gives you networking folks and whoever hires you will ultimately prefer a knowable college.

Am I wrong? I think the issue might be too complicated because of different factors like degree, job prospects for that and other things.

What do you guys think?

More about : undergrad matter

February 21, 2013 11:40:12 PM

Just don't get a low end school like what Phoenix has become.

Quality does matter more for yourself, but in the long run, you being good is probably the biggest thing.

I found that I didn't gain a lot of knowledge in Uni, but I gained a lot of experience researching and hearing other's point of views.

I guess I would say that I learned how to ask good questions.
February 28, 2013 3:07:00 AM

Yeah those low rent ones are basically scams. I know a couple of people that have went to those and their job seems to be to make you feel good about what you do and then let you go. The advantages to a four year state university or even a community college compared to to somewhere such as Phoenix is mobility, adaptability, and resources. Plus consider that just because a degree says the same thing for two schools does not mean it is the same. Take web Development for example. You may get into a situation in school like Phoenix where the course deals mainly with the the design aspect where as a state school may have you do 2-3 years of computer science/programming courses along with the web design, marketing, and business courses. Also you have more options. Say you want to learn a new language or learn android development. Is a lower institution going to offer that at the same rate. Also and last but certainly not least, going to a non accredited college such as Phoenix, Ecpi, or I am assuming Everest means you lock yourself to that school. No transferring or grad work or if you cannot find a job with that degree you have to start at level one at a Community college. Its a huge disadvantage because in 5 - 10 years time you do not know if you will even like the field. Whey people ask questions you hardly hear them ask about flexibility when flexibility is such a huge part of your decision.
March 6, 2013 7:02:03 AM

Am I saying that you should trash your dreams and major in something you’ll totally be miserable in? Definitely not. Despite the fact that majoring in the liberal arts or social sciences may not make you the strongest candidate in the professional world, I think people should still study what they enjoy. Learning what you are passionate about will help you maintain good grades and to be a happier person throughout your college years. So even if you’re not studying economic theory, bio-engineering, or medicine, you can still explore other fields through working, internships, or by picking up a minor.
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