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Desktop Technologies for the Workplace

Last response: in Business Computing
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June 27, 2012 8:39:21 PM

Hey all.

I've been at my current company for some time now an am getting board of the same old stuff. I am looking to learn new technology for better desktop support. We are currently a XP workshop and 7 is about 6 months away. What are some good tech to learn that will aid the usres as well as myself?
June 27, 2012 9:04:08 PM

Hello,

As this is such a broad question, what exactly do you want to learn about? What do you currently know? Do you have MCP?

Are you knowledgeable about networking? DHCP? IPV6/4?

Have you heard/used Offer remote assitance for XP/7?
July 2, 2012 7:24:39 PM

If your company is currently looking to deploy Windows 7, then one of the first places I would start is deployment. Learning the Microsoft Deployment Toolkit (MDT) can be of great asset in any business environment as the versatility of MDT allows it to excel in any deployment scenario. It is also compatible with future versions of Windows ensuring that you will be focusing on a skill applicable in the years to come. A great place to be introduced to MDT might be the article Desktop Image Management: Build a Better Desktop Image from the TechNet Magazine, which outlines some of the concepts which help MDT to be so capable across so many differing situations.

Another great area to hone your skills is in application compatibility, specifically the Microsoft Application Compatibility Toolkit (ACT) which enables complete control over shims, or the layers of abstraction between an application and the operating system which can be used to direct an application to the resources it needs, even when they have been relocated or altered in the newer operating system. Using ACT, most applications which are not architecturally prevented from running on Windows 7, i.e. 16 bit applications, can be made to run properly. A very brief example would be directing an application which is searching for C:\Program Files\ to see C:\Program Files (x86)\ instead. Additionally, take a look into using orca.exe to resolve incompatibilities with .msi installer files. You can really save the day when you can make that archaic software someone relies on work on a new system.

Beyond some of the resources I listed above, the Springboard Site on TechNet hosts volumes of information for IT professionals. Learn the latest tweaks available in Group Policy or explore the perks of the Microsoft Desktop Optimization Pack, filled with tools to make managing the Windows Client in an enterprise easier and more efficient.
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