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Whats coming soon from Dell

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Anonymous
December 31, 2004 5:44:08 PM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

I'm starting to have some issues with my 8200 which is 3 years old next
month. It's the 2.0 Ghz pen4 with 512 mb of ram. I have a ATI 8500 All in
Wonder but the rest is stock.

There has been a lot of improvements since mine was new but don't want to
get caught up like last time, a week after I got mine, there was new chips
etc. What's in the pipeline as far as the next updates in chips etc.
Should I wait a month or 2, buy now or is something even better coming along
in the next few months.

More about : whats coming dell

Anonymous
December 31, 2004 6:22:09 PM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

David B. Mathews wrote:
> I'm starting to have some issues with my 8200 which is 3 years old next
> month. It's the 2.0 Ghz pen4 with 512 mb of ram. I have a ATI 8500 All in
> Wonder but the rest is stock.
>
> There has been a lot of improvements since mine was new but don't want to
> get caught up like last time, a week after I got mine, there was new chips
> etc. What's in the pipeline as far as the next updates in chips etc.
> Should I wait a month or 2, buy now or is something even better coming along
> in the next few months.

Don't know about an 8400 successor, but the 4700 successor, the 5000, is
alread described in detail on the Dell site -- you gotta go to the
documentation area. It's one of the new BTX systems. Weighs 4 lb more
than the 4700 and has a tool-free chassis like the 8000 series (and
4300-4550).


http://premiersupport.dell.com/support/edocs/systems/di...
Anonymous
January 1, 2005 12:58:53 AM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

No matter when you buy, something comes along a week or a month later. Newer
stuff or sale prices.

Intel has sent the message to the world that it is somewhat stuck just above the
3GHz mark, and is now actively working to bring to the mass market dual core
CPUs which function pretty much like today's common dual processor systems.
PCI-Express is coming on as a replacement for AGP and PCI. Serial ATA is pretty
much here already as the drive interface of choice.

How much do you want to spend? There are Dell and other brands of systems
available for every size wallet... Ben Myers

On Fri, 31 Dec 2004 14:44:08 -0500, "David B. Mathews" <dmathews@lsd.k12.mi.us>
wrote:

>
>I'm starting to have some issues with my 8200 which is 3 years old next
>month. It's the 2.0 Ghz pen4 with 512 mb of ram. I have a ATI 8500 All in
>Wonder but the rest is stock.
>
>There has been a lot of improvements since mine was new but don't want to
>get caught up like last time, a week after I got mine, there was new chips
>etc. What's in the pipeline as far as the next updates in chips etc.
>Should I wait a month or 2, buy now or is something even better coming along
>in the next few months.
>
>
Related resources
January 1, 2005 6:28:54 AM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

the initial post from david b. got me to thinking. i bought my two 4600
desktops almost one year ago to this day. at the time dell promoted the
2.8 p4 with 533fsb, 512 ram, and 80gig hd as a machine which delivers
"exeptional performance". i did some research at the time and found
articles dated just over a year before my purchase, which called this
configuration one with "bleeding edge performance".they said it was
capable of amatuer video editing, running graphic intensive programs,
gaming, and multi-tasking with ease. real power. and these claims hold
true. it does all these things with relative calm. and it is indeed
speedy. now, just a year after my purchase and just two years after
the "bleeding edge performance" article, a machine with my exact
specs(sans agp slot)can be found as the dimension 3000 and is promoted
as a budget computer with the tag line of "essential technology on a
budget". so for those of you who have been around computers a lot
longer then i have, my question to you is this: what is this all about?
what is in the numbers and the "new" technology that i don't already
have? i've read a lot in the past year and have learned much about how
computers work, etc. but benchmarks mean very little to me so long as
my machine works well for me. so will i really need pci express, ddr2
ram and a duel core processor in the future to truly keep up with the
new machines or is all this much ado about nothing? as of now i don't
even have hyper-threading. which i don't think i miss. and my machine
seems just as capable and quick as a friend of mines p4 3.2 he
purchased this past summer. so is the average home user simply being
sold better mouse traps, so to speak? or will i really need the latest
"latest and the greatest". and if so, when? can my beloved machine
really become a relic like so many p II's before it? just some food for
thought.
Anonymous
January 1, 2005 9:50:40 AM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

"David B. Mathews" <dmathews@lsd.k12.mi.us> wrote in message
news:a6qdnZhGtIeUMUjcRVn-3A@comcast.com...
>
> I'm starting to have some issues with my 8200 which is 3 years old next
> month. It's the 2.0 Ghz pen4 with 512 mb of ram. I have a ATI 8500 All in
> Wonder but the rest is stock.
>
> There has been a lot of improvements since mine was new but don't want to
> get caught up like last time, a week after I got mine, there was new chips
> etc. What's in the pipeline as far as the next updates in chips etc.
> Should I wait a month or 2, buy now or is something even better coming
along
> in the next few months.

One thing that's scheduled to come soon is the new Intel mobile chipset
(Sonoma) which is scheduled for 01/17/05 release. It's already been delayed
quite a bit so maybe it will actually come out this month.
Anonymous
January 1, 2005 10:32:17 AM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

jd,
It's all about speed. As newer software gets bigger it requires faster
computers to handle it at the same speed. My old laptop (Inspiron 7000
300MHz) still works great. I knew it was getting slower but didn't realize
how much slower till I got this new 8400. Now when I use the Inspiron it's
real slow. Now the Inspiron can't play the new video games like this 8400,
but since I don't play games there isn't much the Inspiron can't do just at
a slower pace.
Paul

"jd" <sickboy2all@aol.com> wrote in message
news:1104578934.269907.81570@c13g2000cwb.googlegroups.com...
> the initial post from david b. got me to thinking. i bought my two 4600
> desktops almost one year ago to this day. at the time dell promoted the
> 2.8 p4 with 533fsb, 512 ram, and 80gig hd as a machine which delivers
> "exeptional performance". i did some research at the time and found
> articles dated just over a year before my purchase, which called this
> configuration one with "bleeding edge performance".they said it was
> capable of amatuer video editing, running graphic intensive programs,
> gaming, and multi-tasking with ease. real power. and these claims hold
> true. it does all these things with relative calm. and it is indeed
> speedy. now, just a year after my purchase and just two years after
> the "bleeding edge performance" article, a machine with my exact
> specs(sans agp slot)can be found as the dimension 3000 and is promoted
> as a budget computer with the tag line of "essential technology on a
> budget". so for those of you who have been around computers a lot
> longer then i have, my question to you is this: what is this all about?
> what is in the numbers and the "new" technology that i don't already
> have? i've read a lot in the past year and have learned much about how
> computers work, etc. but benchmarks mean very little to me so long as
> my machine works well for me. so will i really need pci express, ddr2
> ram and a duel core processor in the future to truly keep up with the
> new machines or is all this much ado about nothing? as of now i don't
> even have hyper-threading. which i don't think i miss. and my machine
> seems just as capable and quick as a friend of mines p4 3.2 he
> purchased this past summer. so is the average home user simply being
> sold better mouse traps, so to speak? or will i really need the latest
> "latest and the greatest". and if so, when? can my beloved machine
> really become a relic like so many p II's before it? just some food for
> thought.
>
Anonymous
January 2, 2005 6:47:57 PM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

On 1 Jan 2005 03:28:54 -0800, "jd" <sickboy2all@aol.com> wrote:

>the initial post from david b. got me to thinking. i bought my two 4600
>desktops almost one year ago to this day. at the time dell promoted the
>2.8 p4 with 533fsb, 512 ram, and 80gig hd as a machine which delivers
>"exeptional performance". i did some research at the time and found
>articles dated just over a year before my purchase, which called this
>configuration one with "bleeding edge performance".they said it was
>capable of amatuer video editing, running graphic intensive programs,
>gaming, and multi-tasking with ease. real power. and these claims hold
>true. it does all these things with relative calm. and it is indeed
>speedy. now, just a year after my purchase and just two years after
>the "bleeding edge performance" article, a machine with my exact
>specs(sans agp slot)can be found as the dimension 3000 and is promoted
>as a budget computer with the tag line of "essential technology on a
>budget". so for those of you who have been around computers a lot
>longer then i have, my question to you is this: what is this all about?
>what is in the numbers and the "new" technology that i don't already
>have?

Well, what's "in" those numbers is BIGGER numbers, of course.

> i've read a lot in the past year and have learned much about how
>computers work, etc. but benchmarks mean very little to me so long as
>my machine works well for me.

Listen to yourself: "My machine works well for me"

>so will i really need pci express, ddr2
>ram and a duel core processor in the future to truly keep up with the
>new machines or is all this much ado about nothing? as of now i don't
>even have hyper-threading.

Oh dear, guess that means you must be HYPO-threading then, huh?! Tsk!

>which i don't think i miss. and my machine
>seems just as capable and quick as a friend of mines p4 3.2 he
>purchased this past summer. so is the average home user simply being
>sold better mouse traps, so to speak?

(The term "better mouse trap" means something that is actually
BETTER!) Your "average home user" is being sold something more akin
to those 'bigger-is-better' emails you get, promising you a size
increase that will finally please your lady!

> or will i really need the latest
>"latest and the greatest". and if so, when? can my beloved machine
>really become a relic like so many p II's before it? just some food for
>thought.

By coincidence, I bought a 4600 just a year ago for my wife. At about
the same time I bought a Dimension XPS (3.0 GHz, 2 GB memory) for
myself.

My wife, a year later, couldn't be happier. She surfs the web, does
email, and uses WordPerfect. Period. This computer will ALWAYS be
adequate for her interests.

I do a great many more things with my computer than she does with
hers, and I like to have several programs running simultaneously.
She, on the other hand, has no use for the task bar--only runs one
program at a time!

About 6 weeks ago we finally had DSL reach us (after years of 24.6
kbps dial-up). My wife's computer use changes only in that she can
surf more quickly, and she, of course, loves that.

But I can now consider downloading movies (on dial-up it took 3 weeks
at 24/7--I tried it just once!). And there's a whole new buncha stuff
I must become familiar with in order to do that.

The only reason I would upgrade to faster-bigger is if I were starting
to feel the bind of a current system.

--John W. Wells
Anonymous
January 2, 2005 7:21:44 PM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

Well I plunked down my money for the new XPS Gen4 from dell. Got the 3.6
P4, XP Media Center05 Edition, 1 gig mem, wireless keyboard/mouse, 2 160 gig
HD's (not raid), standard monitor as I have a almost new 19" Dell Flat
Panel, ATI X800XT video card, floppy drive, ethernet, modem, SB Audigy 2ZS,
surround speakers, extra software, dual drives (48x cd-rw and 16x DVD
read/write with dual layer, TV tuner, and free Myst IV Reveiation and a big
hole in my billfold. Sure hope it goes well.
=========================
"Paul Schilter" <paulschilter@comcast dot net> wrote in message
news:bLSdndQHzafQBUvcRVn-qw@giganews.com...
> jd,
> It's all about speed. As newer software gets bigger it requires faster
> computers to handle it at the same speed. My old laptop (Inspiron 7000
> 300MHz) still works great. I knew it was getting slower but didn't realize
> how much slower till I got this new 8400. Now when I use the Inspiron it's
> real slow. Now the Inspiron can't play the new video games like this 8400,
> but since I don't play games there isn't much the Inspiron can't do just
> at a slower pace.
> Paul
>
> "jd" <sickboy2all@aol.com> wrote in message
> news:1104578934.269907.81570@c13g2000cwb.googlegroups.com...
>> the initial post from david b. got me to thinking. i bought my two 4600
>> desktops almost one year ago to this day. at the time dell promoted the
>> 2.8 p4 with 533fsb, 512 ram, and 80gig hd as a machine which delivers
>> "exeptional performance". i did some research at the time and found
>> articles dated just over a year before my purchase, which called this
>> configuration one with "bleeding edge performance".they said it was
>> capable of amatuer video editing, running graphic intensive programs,
>> gaming, and multi-tasking with ease. real power. and these claims hold
>> true. it does all these things with relative calm. and it is indeed
>> speedy. now, just a year after my purchase and just two years after
>> the "bleeding edge performance" article, a machine with my exact
>> specs(sans agp slot)can be found as the dimension 3000 and is promoted
>> as a budget computer with the tag line of "essential technology on a
>> budget". so for those of you who have been around computers a lot
>> longer then i have, my question to you is this: what is this all about?
>> what is in the numbers and the "new" technology that i don't already
>> have? i've read a lot in the past year and have learned much about how
>> computers work, etc. but benchmarks mean very little to me so long as
>> my machine works well for me. so will i really need pci express, ddr2
>> ram and a duel core processor in the future to truly keep up with the
>> new machines or is all this much ado about nothing? as of now i don't
>> even have hyper-threading. which i don't think i miss. and my machine
>> seems just as capable and quick as a friend of mines p4 3.2 he
>> purchased this past summer. so is the average home user simply being
>> sold better mouse traps, so to speak? or will i really need the latest
>> "latest and the greatest". and if so, when? can my beloved machine
>> really become a relic like so many p II's before it? just some food for
>> thought.
>>
>
>
Anonymous
January 2, 2005 7:21:45 PM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

David,
Well you sure went "whole hog", but it should keep you happy for quite a
while, enjoy.
Paul

"David B. Mathews" <dmathews9586@comcast.net> wrote in message
news:scVBd.12463$wu4.7596@attbi_s52...
> Well I plunked down my money for the new XPS Gen4 from dell. Got the 3.6
> P4, XP Media Center05 Edition, 1 gig mem, wireless keyboard/mouse, 2 160
> gig HD's (not raid), standard monitor as I have a almost new 19" Dell Flat
> Panel, ATI X800XT video card, floppy drive, ethernet, modem, SB Audigy
> 2ZS, surround speakers, extra software, dual drives (48x cd-rw and 16x DVD
> read/write with dual layer, TV tuner, and free Myst IV Reveiation and a
> big hole in my billfold. Sure hope it goes well.
> =========================
> "Paul Schilter" <paulschilter@comcast dot net> wrote in message
> news:bLSdndQHzafQBUvcRVn-qw@giganews.com...
>> jd,
>> It's all about speed. As newer software gets bigger it requires faster
>> computers to handle it at the same speed. My old laptop (Inspiron 7000
>> 300MHz) still works great. I knew it was getting slower but didn't
>> realize how much slower till I got this new 8400. Now when I use the
>> Inspiron it's real slow. Now the Inspiron can't play the new video games
>> like this 8400, but since I don't play games there isn't much the
>> Inspiron can't do just at a slower pace.
>> Paul
>>
>> "jd" <sickboy2all@aol.com> wrote in message
>> news:1104578934.269907.81570@c13g2000cwb.googlegroups.com...
>>> the initial post from david b. got me to thinking. i bought my two 4600
>>> desktops almost one year ago to this day. at the time dell promoted the
>>> 2.8 p4 with 533fsb, 512 ram, and 80gig hd as a machine which delivers
>>> "exeptional performance". i did some research at the time and found
>>> articles dated just over a year before my purchase, which called this
>>> configuration one with "bleeding edge performance".they said it was
>>> capable of amatuer video editing, running graphic intensive programs,
>>> gaming, and multi-tasking with ease. real power. and these claims hold
>>> true. it does all these things with relative calm. and it is indeed
>>> speedy. now, just a year after my purchase and just two years after
>>> the "bleeding edge performance" article, a machine with my exact
>>> specs(sans agp slot)can be found as the dimension 3000 and is promoted
>>> as a budget computer with the tag line of "essential technology on a
>>> budget". so for those of you who have been around computers a lot
>>> longer then i have, my question to you is this: what is this all about?
>>> what is in the numbers and the "new" technology that i don't already
>>> have? i've read a lot in the past year and have learned much about how
>>> computers work, etc. but benchmarks mean very little to me so long as
>>> my machine works well for me. so will i really need pci express, ddr2
>>> ram and a duel core processor in the future to truly keep up with the
>>> new machines or is all this much ado about nothing? as of now i don't
>>> even have hyper-threading. which i don't think i miss. and my machine
>>> seems just as capable and quick as a friend of mines p4 3.2 he
>>> purchased this past summer. so is the average home user simply being
>>> sold better mouse traps, so to speak? or will i really need the latest
>>> "latest and the greatest". and if so, when? can my beloved machine
>>> really become a relic like so many p II's before it? just some food for
>>> thought.
>>>
>>
>>
>
>
January 2, 2005 9:11:19 PM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

actually "better mouse trap" usually refers to something more elaborate
and complex which may be considered better by some or even most, but
which may not be necessary or practical for those who already have
mouse traps that work just fine. however primative. and the who live
in boston rocks like f***! had to throw that in 'cause i just watched
the dvd. big who fan here.
January 2, 2005 9:28:55 PM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

oh, and happy new year everyone. and john wells, your comment about
"feeling the bind"of your current system is very insightful. i think
all this stuff is more of a feel. i think most folks who buy computers
really aren't that interested in the machine itself. but if you really
like your computer you become interested. i mean really really like it
! like i love mine. these are the first computers i've ever owned and i
would hate to see them go. kind of like your first car. but i suppose
one day i'll be glad to see them go. i'll just wait 'til i start
feelin' that 'ol bind. i'm out. happy new year y'all.
Anonymous
January 3, 2005 10:11:59 AM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

Here's an Intel roadmap, which I *think* is current:

http://www.anandtech.com/cpuchipsets/showdoc.aspx?i=225...

The relevant milestons:

1st quarter 2005 (soon!): New P4's with 2MB cache (up from 1MB cache in
previous version).

3rd quarter 2005: First of the dual-core CPUs.

I expect Dell will have new models incorporating these chips as fast as
they're available.

My comment: If you want to be conservative and still get the most bang for
your buck, the 2MB cache P4 (soon to be released) might be a good place to
climb on. This is a refined Prescott, so they've presumably tweaked all the
kinks out (there's usually a bit of roughness in the first releases), and
they've got it running as fast and smooth as it can get. The jump to
dual-CPUs later in the year is interesting, but I'm inclined not to buy
immediately; instead see how they work and and maybe wait for them to become
a bit more refined. So I would wait for Dell to switch to the 2MB P4, or if
you want to wait longer, wait for the 1st or 2nd generation of the dual-core
CPUs,

Here's more info about the dual-cores:

http://www.anandtech.com/cpuchipsets/showdoc.aspx?i=225...
!