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20 minute boot

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Anonymous
January 2, 2005 7:41:46 AM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

I have a Dell with a Pentium 3 and XP Pro. I got it used a week or two ago.
When I boot up the first screen shows the pentium line and then a RAM
line. This starts at 10 Mb and then increases 4 Mb at a step, one step
every 20 secs.
Since there is 256 Mb of ram it takes 20 minutes to start loading XP!

Has anyone met this problem I wonder?

Richard

More about : minute boot

Anonymous
January 2, 2005 7:41:47 AM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

"Cordelion" <richardbeney@nospam dsl.pipex.com> wrote in message
news:aaabbf255ec785c899764d4458f46402@localhost.talkaboutcomputing.com...
>I have a Dell with a Pentium 3 and XP Pro. I got it used a week or two ago.
> When I boot up the first screen shows the pentium line and then a RAM
> line. This starts at 10 Mb and then increases 4 Mb at a step, one step
> every 20 secs.
> Since there is 256 Mb of ram it takes 20 minutes to start loading XP!
>
> Has anyone met this problem I wonder?
>
> Richard
>

What model/number Dell is it? Sounds as if the BIOS needs to be
reset/defaulted, as the memory's been changed/upgraded and/or the machine is
set to run the long POST....

Stew
Anonymous
January 3, 2005 12:45:14 AM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

This may be a symptom of incompatible memory, or something else wrong with the
BIOS hardware setup. It should not ever take 20 min to cycle through the BIOS
memory tests on any computer. Which model??? ... Ben Myers

On Sun, 02 Jan 2005 04:41:46 -0500, "Cordelion" <richardbeney@nospam
dsl.pipex.com> wrote:

>I have a Dell with a Pentium 3 and XP Pro. I got it used a week or two ago.
>When I boot up the first screen shows the pentium line and then a RAM
>line. This starts at 10 Mb and then increases 4 Mb at a step, one step
>every 20 secs.
>Since there is 256 Mb of ram it takes 20 minutes to start loading XP!
>
>Has anyone met this problem I wonder?
>
>Richard
>
Related resources
Anonymous
January 3, 2005 12:45:15 AM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

I remember when I upgraded my RAM on my 8300, all I had to do was go into
the BIOS program and confirm the amount of total RAM was correct and that
was that. I know I now have 1.5 GB so it never asked again and the computer
and System stats bear that out.

So I have to agree with Ben that there is something screwed up in the memory
modules or in the BIOS setup.

<ben_myers_spam_me_not @ charter.net (Ben Myers)> wrote in message
news:41d867c0.867701@nntp.charter.net...
> This may be a symptom of incompatible memory, or something else wrong with
the
> BIOS hardware setup. It should not ever take 20 min to cycle through the
BIOS
> memory tests on any computer. Which model??? ... Ben Myers
Anonymous
January 4, 2005 9:15:56 AM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

Its a Dimension 4100. It booted OK at first, but after a friend loaded XP
Pro for me the trouble began.
It doesn't respond to Del to get into the BIOS.
Thanks for help.
Richard
Anonymous
January 4, 2005 9:17:06 AM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

Its a Dimension 4100. It booted OK at first, but after a friend loaded XP
Pro for me the trouble began.
It doesn't respond to Del to get into the BIOS.
Thanks for help.
Richard
Anonymous
January 4, 2005 1:14:08 PM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

"Cordelion" <richardbeney@nospam dsl.pipex.com> wrote:

>Its a Dimension 4100. It booted OK at first, but after a friend loaded XP
>Pro for me the trouble began.
>It doesn't respond to Del to get into the BIOS.

I am preparing a similar era [Dimension L733r} machine for sale
[reinstalling XPPro from scratch after clearing all data, etc.].
The Del key didn't fail to get me into BIOS, but you do have to
keep hitting it as soon as you hit your computer's on button.
There's a relatively small window [e.g., supposed to be after the
POSTs, and before the boot gets to where it starts loading the
OS.

From the dim recesses of memory, hitting the <Esc> key will abort
that memory check. Used to use it all the time in the BADD.

In the BIOS, depending on era, you will find some options. On my
L733, they were labeled "Quick Boot" and "Quiet Boot". In my
case, it what the "Quick Boot" setting that did away with that
RAM check, among a couple of other things. The "Quiet Boot"
means that the "Dell Logo" would stay on the screen until the OS
boot process started. Back in those BADD, I actually liked to
watch config.sys and autoexec.bat marching up the screen -
reminding me what I had in them. Nowadays, anything you would
see on the screen would scoot up the screen faster than you could
read it, and there's nothing much to read in the first place with
Win. And that is only if your monitor is warm/has warmed up
enough to show anything before the OS boot starts. So the Quiet
Boot doesn't lose you much, if anything.

[BADD = Bad Old DOS Days for the age challenged.]
--
OJ III
[Email to Yahoo address may be burned before reading.
Lower and crunch the sig and you'll net me at comcast.]
Anonymous
January 4, 2005 8:46:04 PM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

As a last resort to access the motherboard's BIOS setup menus, there's always
the old 10-key chord trick. Power up the computer and quickly hold down as many
keys on the keyboard as one's fingers can touch. The BIOS will smartly sense
that something is not right with the keyboard, generate a BIOS keyboard error
message, and give you the option to access the CMOS setup to "correct" the
error. This seems to work on nearly all brands of computers and motherboards,
except maybe MicroChannel and EISA computers which had their own setup diskettes
rather than a CMOS setup integrated in the BIOS.... Ben Myers

On Tue, 04 Jan 2005 10:14:08 -0500, Ogden Johnson III <oj3usmc@yahoo.com> wrote:

>"Cordelion" <richardbeney@nospam dsl.pipex.com> wrote:
>
>>Its a Dimension 4100. It booted OK at first, but after a friend loaded XP
>>Pro for me the trouble began.
>>It doesn't respond to Del to get into the BIOS.
>
>I am preparing a similar era [Dimension L733r} machine for sale
>[reinstalling XPPro from scratch after clearing all data, etc.].
>The Del key didn't fail to get me into BIOS, but you do have to
>keep hitting it as soon as you hit your computer's on button.
>There's a relatively small window [e.g., supposed to be after the
>POSTs, and before the boot gets to where it starts loading the
>OS.
>
>From the dim recesses of memory, hitting the <Esc> key will abort
>that memory check. Used to use it all the time in the BADD.
>
>In the BIOS, depending on era, you will find some options. On my
>L733, they were labeled "Quick Boot" and "Quiet Boot". In my
>case, it what the "Quick Boot" setting that did away with that
>RAM check, among a couple of other things. The "Quiet Boot"
>means that the "Dell Logo" would stay on the screen until the OS
>boot process started. Back in those BADD, I actually liked to
>watch config.sys and autoexec.bat marching up the screen -
>reminding me what I had in them. Nowadays, anything you would
>see on the screen would scoot up the screen faster than you could
>read it, and there's nothing much to read in the first place with
>Win. And that is only if your monitor is warm/has warmed up
>enough to show anything before the OS boot starts. So the Quiet
>Boot doesn't lose you much, if anything.
>
>[BADD = Bad Old DOS Days for the age challenged.]
>--
>OJ III
>[Email to Yahoo address may be burned before reading.
>Lower and crunch the sig and you'll net me at comcast.]
!