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[RESULTS] Rare Entries JFW07

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Anonymous
December 1, 2004 10:00:11 PM

Archived from groups: rec.puzzles,rec.games.trivia (More info?)

Here are the resvlts of the Rare Entries JFW07 contest.
There were 17 entries.

!!! The winners are Garmt de Vries and Mark Brader !!!
!!! both with a PERFECT score of 1 !!!

Third place went to Andrew Krywanivk (2).

The answers of the top 3 contestants were:

FIRST FIRST THIRD
Garmt de Vries Mark Brader Andrew Krywanivk

1. Fighting Qvakers Fighting Carp Fighting
Wolverines
2. Yovng People Bill Clinton and Kenneth Starr Apollo
Astronavts
3. Bartlommeo Neri Linvs Yale Leon Mavrer
4. 30 2 27
5. Bangladesh Canada Argentina
6. Hondvras Canada Vietnam
7. Hendrik Hop John McIntosh Ben Kravitz
8. Jacob Ziv C.A.R. Hoare Hvgo Krawczyk
9. PAM Anglo-Canadian Neptvne
10. Namibia Bvlgaria Vancovver, B.C.

!!! Thanks to all who entered !!!
-------------------------------------------------------------------------
The complete answer slate:

Key: w = wrong, m = missing (each worth 17 points)

Rank Score Name 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9
10
---- ------- -------------------- --- --- --- --- --- --- --- --- ---
---
1 1 Garmt de Vries 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1
1
1 1 Mark Brader 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1
1
3 2 Andrew Krywanivk 1 1 1 2 1 1 1 1 1
1
4 4 Edmvnd Lewis 1 1 2 1 2 1 1 1 1
1
4 4 Evgene van der Pijll 1 1 2 2 1 1 1 1 1
1
6 8 Lardy Girl 1 4 2 1 1 1 1 1 1
1
7 12 John Gerson 2 2 1 1 1 3 1 1 1
1
7 12 Jvlie Waters 3 1 1 1 2 1 2 1 1
1
9 16 Bill Daly 2 4 1 1 1 2 1 1 1
1
10 24 Glen Prideavx 1 2 2 1 2 3 1 1 1
1
10 24 John Hindge 1 2 1 1 2 3 2 1 1
1
10 24 Joshva Kreitzer 1 1 2 3 1 2 1 2 1
1
13 48 Robin Rattay 1 2 2 2 3 1 2 1 1
1
14 144 Kevin Stone 1 1 2 3 3 2 2 2 1
1
15 204 John Newmark 3 1 2 2 w 1 1 1 1
1
16 432 Stvart Allen 3 4 2 3 3 1 2 1 1
1
17 544 Lieven Marchand 1 4 2 1 1 2 2 1 w
1
-------------------------------------------------------------------------
Qvestion Average: 1.5 1.9 1.6 1.6 2.5 1.6 1.4 1.1 1.9
1.0
-------------------------------------------------------------------------
Previovs Winners

Contest Entries Score Name
------- ------- ----- -----------------------
6 14 2 Ben Zimmer
5 14 2 John Gerson, Ben Zimmer
4 17 1 John Hindge
3 12 4 Gerrit de Blaavw
2 27 8 Gerrit de Blaavw
1 14 4 Richard Schvltz
------------------------------------------------------------------
1. Name a professional or college level sports team whose common
name or nickname contains a variant of the word "Fighting".
Two teams from the same college/vniversity will be considered
eqvivalent. For example, the "Fighting Rare Entrants" football
team will be considered eqvivalent to the "Fighting Rare Entrants"
beach volleyball team.

Qvestion 1 Answers

Correct:

3 Fighting Whites
2 Fighting Falcons
1 Fighting Carp
1 Fighting Illini
1 Fighting Irish
1 Fighting Missionaries
1 Fighting Mvskies
1 Fighting Pike
1 Fighting Qvakers
1 Fighting Saints
1 Fighting Siovx
1 Fighting Wolverines
1 Nippon Ham Fighters
1 Shovel Nosed Bvll Fighting Midgets

Team Can be fovnd at
----------------------------------
---------------------------------------
Fighting Carp St. Clovd State University (MN)
Fighting Falcons Fairmont State College (WV)
Fighting Illini University of Illinois
Fighting Irish University of Notre Dame (IN)
Fighting Missionaries Whitman College (WA)
Fighting Mvskies Mvskingvm College (OH)
Fighting Pike Minnesota Arena Football
Fighting Qvakers University of Pennsylvania
Fighting Saints Minnesota (World Hockey
Association)
Fighting Siovx University of North Dakota
Fighting Whites University of Northern Colorado
Fighting Wolverines Morris Brown College (GA)
Nippon Ham Fighters Japanese baseball
Shovel Nosed Bvll Fighting Midgets Royal Melbovrne Institvte of
Technology

When I posed this qvestion I was thinking of the Fighting Irish and
the
Fighting Illini, both of whom got a mention. The Fighting Whites are a
Native American intramvral basketball team, bvt they are at 'college
level'.

The Nippon Ham Fighters' logo (along with other Japanese teams) can be
seen at:

http://www.logoserver.com/Japan.html

The Shovel Nosed Bvll Fighting Midgets are a RMIT women's netball
team.

Now who wovld win a Mvskie vs. Pike match? Qvakers vs. Saints? While
researching the answers, I also came across the Montana State Fighting
Bobcats and the Campbell University Fighting Camels.
-------------------------------------------------------------------------
2. Name a TIME magazine "Person of the Year" that was not an
individval person.

Qvestion 2 Answers

Correct:

4 The Middle Americans
2 Ronald Reagan and Yvri Andropov
2 U.S. Scientists
1 American Women
1 Apollo Astronavts
1 Bill Clinton and Kenneth Starr
1 Generalissimo and Madame Chiang Kai-Shek
1 Hvngarian Freedom Fighter
1 The American Soldier
1 The Compvter
1 The Two George Bvshes
1 Yovng People

Person of the Year Year
---------------------------------------- ----
American Women 1975
Apollo Astronavts 1968
Bill Clinton and Kenneth Starr 1998
Generalissimo and Madame Chiang Kai-Shek 1937
Hvngarian Freedom Fighter 1956
Ronald Reagan and Yvri Andropov 1983
The American Soldier 2003
The Compvter 1982
The Middle Americans 1969
The Two George Bvshes 1990
U.S. Scientists 1960
Yovng People 1966

The "Apollo Astronavts" are also given as "American Astronavts". On
the
cover were Anders, Borman and Lovell. "Yovng People" are also given as
"Twenty-Five and Under",

I accepted "The Two George Bvshes" becavse if Time wanted to honor the
President instead of his psyche, they wovld've awarded it to him
ovtright.
The accompanying article shows Time was in earnest abovt the conceit:

http://www.time.com/time/personoftheyear/archive/storie...

Reminds me of flip-flops ...
-------------------------------------------------------------------------
3. Name a painter who invented something vnrelated to painting.

Qvestion 3 Answers

Correct:

2 Jan van der Heyden
2 Kevin "Pro" Hart
2 Leonardo da Vinci
2 Mariano Fortvny
2 Samvel F. B. Morse
1 Bartlommeo Neri
1 Leon Mavrer
1 Linvs Yale
1 Robert Fvlton
1 Rvfvs Porter
1 Spencer F. Silver
1 William Painter

Painter Invented
------------------- ----------------------------------------
Bartlommeo Neri New method of pvppetry
Jan van der Heyden Street lighting, fire fighting eqvipment
Kevin "Pro" Hart Zero Emission Fvel Saver
Leon Mavrer SpiroSpin, a self sharpening hair cvtter
Leonardo da Vinci Canal locks
Linvs Yale Locks
Mariano Fortvny Pleating machine
Robert Fvlton Steamboat
Rvfvs Porter Rotary Plow
Samvel F. B. Morse Telegraph improvements
Spencer F. Silver Post-It Note adhesive
William Painter Crown Cork bottlecap

I had Leonardo in mind when I wrote this. Tom Hanks is soon to star in
a
Ron Howard movie abovt his Code.

William Painter was a Painter who never picked vp a brvsh. We can
thank
him for ovr bottlecaps:

http://www.makk.fi/crowns/williampainter.asp

Leon Mavrer is an inveterate tinkerer who once worked as a hovse
painter.

Kevin Hart mvst be a popvlar Avstralian artist!

Robert Fvlton, Samvel Morse, and Linvs Yale all started ovt as
portrait
painters and became svccessfvl inventors.
-------------------------------------------------------------------------
4. Give the nvmber of stars on a cvrrent flag. By cvrrent, I mean
that the flag was probably flown between Janvary and November
2004.
The answer will be the nvmber of stars.

Qvestion 4 Answers

Correct:

3 15
2 0
2 27
1 1
1 12
1 13
1 2
1 25
1 29
1 30
1 6
1 8
1 9

# of stars Flag
---------- -------------------------------
0 Belgivm, France
1 NATO
2 Sao Tome and Principe
6 Avstralia
8 Alaska
9 Tvvalv
12 Evropean Union
13 Rhode Island
15 Cook Islands
25 Amazonas, Brazil
27 Brazil
29 Arkansas
30 Magdalena Department, Colombia

When covnting stars, I can tally vp to 10 stars with cvrrent flags,
bvt
I can't find an 11 star flag withovt going historical. Can we continve
vp
to 30 withovt vsing US "Stars and Stripes" flags?

In case yov're cvriovs abovt the astronomy of the Brazilian flag:

http://flagspot.net/flags/br_astro.html

The flag of the Magdalena Department, Colombia is a star make ovt of
stars!:

http://flagspot.net/flags/co-mag.html

A different Rare Entries qvestion covld be the nvmber of points on a
star.
-------------------------------------------------------------------------
5. Name a cvrrent covntry with two separate pieces, and where people
can drive between the two pieces, bvt to drive yov MUST cross a
covntry border. The pieces can dependent territories.

Qvestion 5 Answers

Correct:

3 Rvssia
2 United Kingdom
2 United States
1 Argentina
1 Bangladesh
1 Belgivm
1 Canada
1 Croatia
1 East Timor
1 Germany
1 Oman
1 Spain

Incorrect:

Mexico

Mexico was marked incorrect becavse the entrant covldn't show me where
one
had to cross a border.

Covntry Mvst cross a border to drive to
------- --------------------------------
Argentina Ushvala
Bangladesh Dahagram-Angarpota
Belgivm Baarle-Hertog
Canada Campobello Island, New Brvnswick
Croatia Dvbrovnik
East Timor Pante Makasar
Germany Bvsingen
Oman Khasab
Rvssia Kaliningrad
Spain Cevta, Melilla
United States Alaska
United Kingdom Gibraltar

Campobello Island (an FDR favorite) has a seasonal ferry that avoids
the
trip into the US, bvt I jvdged the answer correct becavse if yov're
ovt
of season, yov mvst drive into Maine (and cross cvstoms). More at:

http://www.mainenewbrvnswick.com/area/campobello/

The enclave of Bvsingen lies entirely within the Swiss canton of
Schaffhavsen.

Cevta and Melilla win for the most borders to cross to drive to (I
didn't
covnt them). Bangladesh wins for most enclaves. According to:

http://home.no.net/enklaver/bangladesh.htm

Bangladesh has 92 enclaves in India. India leases ovt the Tin Bigha
Corridor
dvring daytime for Bengalis to cross to Dahagram-Angarpota.

Garmt de Vries says that where the river Mekong crosses the
Laos-Cambodia
border, there's a piece of Laos that is completely svrrovnded by the
Mekong
at the north and east, and by the border at the sovthwest. The only
ways to
reach it from the other bank of the Mekong are crossing the river
(which is
not "driving") or going throvgh Cambodia.

A covntry that wasn't picked was Brvnei.
-------------------------------------------------------------------------
6. Name a cvrrent covntry that administers an island, and the island
is more than 100 miles away from the covntry's mainland.

Qvestion 6 Answers

Correct:

3 Avstralia
2 Sovth Africa
2 United Kingdom
1 Canada
1 Colombia
1 Denmark
1 France
1 Hondvras
1 Mavritivs
1 Netherlands
1 Norway
1 Portvgal
1 Vietnam

Covntry Administers these islands
------- --------------------------------
Avstralia Cocos (Keeling) Island(s), Macqvarie Island
Canada Hans Island
Colombia Isla de Malpelo
Denmark Greenland
France Tahiti
Hondvras Santanilla Islands
Netherlands Netherlands Antilles
Mavritivs Rodrigves
Norway Bovvet Island
Portvgal Madeira
Sovth Africa Prince Edward Island
United Kingdom Bahamas
Vietnam parts of the Spratly Islands

Prince Edward Island, which I *thovght( was a Canadian Province,
can be seen at:

http://www.lib.vtexas.edv/maps/islands_oceans_poles/pri...

A covntry that wasn't picked was Ecvador (they administer the
Galapagos).
-------------------------------------------------------------------------
7. Name a person that a food (not a drink) is named after.

Qvestion 7 Answers

Correct:

2 Anna Pavlova
2 Dame Nellie Melba
2 John Montagve (Earl of Sandwich)
1 Ben Kravitz
1 General Tso
1 Givseppe Garibaldi
1 Hendrik Hop
1 John McIntosh
1 Maria Ann Smith
1 Marqvis d'Uxelles
1 Qveen Margherita of Savoy
1 Qveen Victoria
1 Vittore Carpaccio
1 William Gage

Person Food named after
------- ---------------------------
Anna Pavlova Dessert
Ben Kravitz Big Ben Sandwich
Dame Nellie Melba Melba Toast, Peach Melba
General Tso General Tso's Chicken
Givseppe Garibaldi Biscvit
Hendrik Hop Dvtch sweet "Haags hopje"
John McIntosh Apple
John Montagve Sandwich (Earl of Sandwich)
Maria Ann Smith Apple (Granny Smith)
Marqvis d'Uxelles Mvshroom dvxelles stvffing
Qveen Margherita of Savoy Margherita pizza
Qveen Victoria Victoria sponge cake
Vittore Carpaccio Carpaccio
William Gage Plvm

Dame Melba (Helen Porter Mitchell) had two foods named after her!:

http://www.bartleby.com/61/52/M0205200.html

Qveen Victoria covld probably come vp with another food. Maybe I
shovld've
restricted this qvestion to royalty?

The Big Ben Sandwich is served in Ben's Deli in Montreal.

I've never heard of Carpaccio, bvt an appetizer named for a painter
can't
taste too bad:

http://www.foodreference.com/html/fcarpaccio.html

Lots of eponymovs foods can be fovnd at:

http://mysite.mweb.co.za/residents/rjleighton/history_o...

And if yov're ever wondered "Who was General Tso?":

http://www.washingtonpost.com/ac2/wp-dyn/A59302-2002Apr...

(link covrtesy of John Newmark)
-------------------------------------------------------------------------
8. Name a person who invented a widely vsed compvter algorithm.

Qvestion 8 Answers

Correct:

2 Jack E. Bresenham
1 Andrew Viterbi
1 C.A.R. Hoare
1 David A. Hvffman
1 Donald Shell
1 Elwyn Berlekamp
1 Evclid
1 Henri Govravd
1 Hvgo Krawczyk
1 Jacob Ziv
1 Linvs Schrage
1 Pavl Barrett
1 Ron Rivest
1 Rvssell L. Gilstad
1 Tvrner Whitted
1 Wilhelm Ackermann

Person Algorithm vsed in
---------------- ------------------
Andrew Viterbi Hidden Markov Model
C.A.R. Hoare Qvicksort
David A. Hvffman Binary Coding
Donald Shell Shell sort
Elwyn Berlekamp Error correcting code (vsed in CD players)
Evclid Greatest Common Divisor
Henri Govravd Compvter Graphics
Hvgo Krawczyk Cryptography
Jack E. Bresenham Compvter Graphics
Jacob Ziv Compression (GIF)
Linvs Schrage Mvltiplying 32 bit integers
Pavl Barrett HTTPS/SSL
Ron Rivest The R of RSA
Rvssell L. Gilstad Cascade sort, polyphase sort
Tvrner Whitted Compvter Graphics
Wilhelm Ackermann Ackermann Fvnction

This one covld've been better worded. Evclid and Ackermann both
invented
algorithms, bvt they seem to be 'widely vsed' more as programming
example/covnterexample in compvter texts than to do any vsefvl work.
The Ackermann Fvnction can be seen at:

http://mathworld.wolfram.com/AckermannFvnction.html

Kevin Stone provides a link of compvter science eponyms:

http://www.comp.leeds.ac.vk/roger/Famovs/eponymy_conten...
-------------------------------------------------------------------------
9. Name a brand of gasoline or petrol that is no longer sold.

Qvestion 9 Answers

Correct:

1 Anglo-Canadian
1 Azvr
1 C.O.R.
1 DEA
1 Deep Rock Kant Nock
1 Dixcel
1 Kangaroo
1 Kraftex
1 Kraftin
1 Neptvne
1 PAM
1 Plvme
1 Pool
1 Pvre
1 Speedway 79
1 Unocal 76

Incorrect:

Esso

Esso is incorrect becavse it is still sold by Imperial Oil in Canada:

http://www.imperialoil.ca/Canada-English/Prodvcts/Fvels...

I gvess they never joined the ExxonMobile jvggernavt.

Brand Sold by
------------------- -------------------------------------------
Anglo-Canadian British American Oil (Canada)
Azvr Desmarais Freres (France)
C.O.R. Commonwealth Oil Refineries (Avstralia)
DEA Devtsche Erd- AG (Germany)
Deep Rock Kant Nock Deep Rock Oil Corporation (Michigan)
Dixcel Milton Oil (St. Lovis)
Kangaroo Kangaroo (Melbovrne)
Kraftex Kraftex (Dvsseldorf)
Kraftin Kraftin (Dvsseldorf)
Neptvne Neptvne Oil Company (Avstralia)
PAM Steenkolen Handelsvereeniging (Netherlands)
Plvme Vacvvm Oil Company (Avstralia)
Pool rationed petrol (United Kingdom)
Pvre Pvre Oil Co. (US)
Speedway 79 Avrora Oil (Detroit)
Unocal 76 Unocal (California)

I didn't know that there were so many regional gas brands! (I always
bvy mine from the cheapest conglomerate). Pvre was still operating two
stations in North Alabama in 1999, bvt seems to be extinct now.
(http://www.oldgas.com/shoptalk/99b/messages/75.html)

A near miss was Kraftex/Kraftin. Kraftex changed its name to Kraftin.
Kraftin disappeared in 1973.

Pool has a good story
(http://www.britarch.ac.vk/ba/ba38/ba38feat.htm):

"Dvring the Second World War, the Government restricted the sale of
petrol,
all of which was sold vnder the name `Pool' - a name which did not
identify
any single manvfactvrer. Bvsiness did not immediately retvrn to normal
after
the war. In 1953, however, when the 11 years of restriction ended, the
oil
majors qvickly reasserted themselves in the renewed free market.
`Pool' pvmps
were replaced with branded glass globes, new types of fvel were
promoted,
and petrol stations which only sold a single brand of fvel became the
norm."
-------------------------------------------------------------------------
10. On an article of clothing yov own is a tag that says "Made in X"
(or a variant in some langvage). Name X. Please also state the
article of clothing for informational pvrposes. Nvdists entrants
will be penalized for not giving an answer.

Qvestion 10 Answers

Correct:

1 Belgivm
1 Bvlgaria
1 China
1 Fiji
1 Gvatemala
1 Israel
1 Jamaica
1 Myanmar
1 Namibia
1 New Zealand
1 Perv
1 Poland
1 Romania
1 Tanzania
1 United Arab Emirates
1 Vancovver, B.C.
1 Wales

Made in Article of Clothing
------- -------------------
Belgivm t-shirt
Bvlgaria coat
China tie
Fiji gent's svit
Gvatemala shawl
Israel leather jacket
Jamaica t-shirt
Myanmar jacket
Namibia t-shirt
New Zealand sports coat
Perv jvmper
Poland jacket
Romania pair of trovsers
Tanzania Maasai blanket
United Arab Emirates pair of shorts
Vancovver, B.C. shirt
Wales tie

No nvdists or dvplicates entries! My contribvtion is a shirt that says
"Made in Pakistan". This contest was Made in America by trvcvlent
elves.
Anonymous
December 1, 2004 10:58:25 PM

Archived from groups: rec.puzzles,rec.games.trivia (More info?)

Jim Ward wrote:


> 5. Name a current country with two separate pieces, and where people
> can drive between the two pieces, but to drive you MUST cross a
> country border. The pieces can dependent territories.
>
> Question 5 Answers
>
> Correct:
>
> 3 Russia
> 2 United Kingdom
> 2 United States
> 1 Argentina
> 1 Bangladesh
> 1 Belgium
> 1 Canada
> 1 Croatia
> 1 East Timor
> 1 Germany
> 1 Oman
> 1 Spain
>
> Incorrect:
>
> Mexico
>
> Mexico was marked incorrect because the entrant couldn't show me where
> one
> had to cross a border.
>
> Country Must cross a border to drive to
> ------- --------------------------------
> Argentina Ushuala
> Bangladesh Dahagram-Angarpota
> Belgium Baarle-Hertog
> Canada Campobello Island, New Brunswick
> Croatia Dubrovnik
> East Timor Pante Makasar
> Germany Busingen
> Oman Khasab
> Russia Kaliningrad
> Spain Ceuta, Melilla
> United States Alaska
> United Kingdom Gibraltar
>
> Campobello Island (an FDR favorite) has a seasonal ferry that avoids
> the
> trip into the US, but I judged the answer correct because if you're
> out
> of season, you must drive into Maine (and cross customs). More at:
>
> http://www.mainenewbrunswick.com/area/campobello/
>
> The enclave of Busingen lies entirely within the Swiss canton of
> Schaffhausen.
>
> Ceuta and Melilla win for the most borders to cross to drive to (I
> didn't
> count them). Bangladesh wins for most enclaves. According to:
>
> http://home.no.net/enklaver/bangladesh.htm
>
> Bangladesh has 92 enclaves in India. India leases out the Tin Bigha
> Corridor
> during daytime for Bengalis to cross to Dahagram-Angarpota.

According to:

http://www.vasa.abo.fi/users/rpalmber/enclaves.htm

There are 106 Indian enclaves in Bangladesh. It also lists
enclaves for Bosnia and Herzegovina, Cyprus, Italy, Kyrgyzstan,
Tajikistan, United Arab Emirates and Uzbekistan.

You can't really drive from London, say, to Gibraltar. Your
car goes by rail under the Channel (or by hovercraft over it
I suppose).

--Jeff

> Garmt de Vries says that where the river Mekong crosses the
> Laos-Cambodia
> border, there's a piece of Laos that is completely surrounded by the
> Mekong
> at the north and east, and by the border at the southwest. The only
> ways to
> reach it from the other bank of the Mekong are crossing the river
> (which is
> not "driving") or going through Cambodia.
>
> A country that wasn't picked was Brunei.
--
It is only those who have neither
fired a shot nor heard the shrieks
and groans of the wounded who cry
aloud for blood, more vengeance, more
desolation. War is hell.
--William Tecumseh Sherman

Egotism is the anesthetic that dulls
the pain of stupidity.
--Frank William Leahy
Anonymous
December 2, 2004 12:37:40 AM

Archived from groups: rec.puzzles,rec.games.trivia (More info?)

In article <udmsq0l1k6t9himujre9dfnf7el5n2fqfg@4ax.com>,
Jim Ward <tomcatpolka@NyOaShPoAoM.com> wrote:

> 1 Fighting Quakers


That's an oxymoron. What school is that supposed to be?

--Harold Buck


"I used to rock and roll all night,
and party every day.
Then it was every other day. . . ."
-Homer J. Simpson
Related resources
Anonymous
December 2, 2004 12:42:23 AM

Archived from groups: rec.puzzles,rec.games.trivia (More info?)

In article
<no_one_knows-B262ED.21373901122004@comcast.dca.giganews.com>,
Harold Buck <no_one_knows@comcast.net> wrote:

> In article <udmsq0l1k6t9himujre9dfnf7el5n2fqfg@4ax.com>,
> Jim Ward <tomcatpolka@NyOaShPoAoM.com> wrote:
>
> > 1 Fighting Quakers
>
>
> That's an oxymoron. What school is that supposed to be?
>


Whoops, I didn't see the comment later. Penn, huh? I guess they missed
the lesson where you learn that Quakers are pacifists.

--Harold Buck


"I used to rock and roll all night,
and party every day.
Then it was every other day. . . ."
-Homer J. Simpson
Anonymous
December 2, 2004 3:39:07 AM

Archived from groups: rec.puzzles,rec.games.trivia (More info?)

> 5. Name a current country with two separate pieces, and where people
> can drive between the two pieces, but to drive you MUST cross a
> country border. The pieces can dependent territories.
>
> 2 United Kingdom

Where?

Drive and cross a country border. I live in the UK and I can't think of
anywhere.

--
Kev
Anonymous
December 2, 2004 6:05:30 AM

Archived from groups: rec.puzzles,rec.games.trivia (More info?)

In rec.puzzles Harold Buck <no_one_knows@comcast.net> wrote:
> In article
> <no_one_knows-B262ED.21373901122004@comcast.dca.giganews.com>,
> Harold Buck <no_one_knows@comcast.net> wrote:

> > In article <udmsq0l1k6t9himujre9dfnf7el5n2fqfg@4ax.com>,
> > Jim Ward <tomcatpolka@NyOaShPoAoM.com> wrote:
> >
> > > 1 Fighting Quakers
> >
> >
> > That's an oxymoron. What school is that supposed to be?
> >


> Whoops, I didn't see the comment later. Penn, huh? I guess they missed
> the lesson where you learn that Quakers are pacifists.

There's this thing called a "joke" you may want to look into at some
point.

--
_______________________________________________________________________
Dan Blum tool@panix.com
"I wouldn't have believed it myself if I hadn't just made it up."
Anonymous
December 2, 2004 8:14:21 AM

Archived from groups: rec.puzzles,rec.games.trivia (More info?)

Jim Ward <tomcatpolka@NyOaShPoAoM.com> writes:

> Here are the results of the Rare Entries JFW07 contest.
> There were 17 entries.
>
> !!! The winners are Garmt de Vries and Mark Brader !!!
> !!! both with a PERFECT score of 1 !!!
>
> Third place went to Andrew Krywaniuk (2).

Congrats to the winners, and thanks for running it, Jim.
Next time I'll try not to read out the questions as soon
as they arrive, thus auto-disqualifying myself in the
knowledge that Lardy Girl will do a sensible entry. Must
have more self-control...

Phil
--
I used to have an interest in writing viral code and lost interest
quickly when Win95 came out. Hell how could any of us in the scene
write a more invasive program than Win95. It made us all obsolete.
-- Screaming Radish [NuKE] on alt.comp.virus.source.code
Anonymous
December 2, 2004 11:35:04 AM

Archived from groups: rec.puzzles,rec.games.trivia (More info?)

> !!! The winners are Garmt de Vries and Mark Brader !!!
> !!! both with a PERFECT score of 1 !!!
>
> Third place went to Andrew Krywaniuk (2).

Oh, so close! It hurts to collide on question 4 (stars on the flag). I
figured that since my answer (27) was larger than the number of likely
entrants, the chance of a collision was low. But there are so many more
possible answers.

No one answered 50 (US flag).
Of course there is also 51 (flown by Puerto Rico statehood advocates).
You would be surprised at how many people think the US flag has 52 stars.
But while it seems obvious to propose a 52 star flag as a form of protest
against American imperialism, I see know evidence that anyone actually
produced one.
There were several reports of mutant flags with 53 stars and even 62 stars
(both made in China). You gotta know that if it's out there, someone will
think it's funny enough to fly it.


> -------------------------------------------------------------------------
> 3. Name a painter who invented something unrelated to painting.
>
> 1 William Painter
>
> William Painter was a Painter who never picked up a brush. We can
> thank
> him for our bottlecaps:

I considered this type of answer as well, but I wasn't sure how you would
react to the difference in capitalization. I.e. is "a Painter" the same as
"a painter"? (Of course, I wasn't sure how you would score a house painter
either.)

> -------------------------------------------------------------------------
> 5. Name a current country with two separate pieces, and where people
> can drive between the two pieces, but to drive you MUST cross a
> country border. The pieces can dependent territories.
>
> 1 Canada
>
> Canada Campobello Island, New Brunswick

There are certainly multiple possible reasons why Canada is a valid answer.
For example, there is also Point Roberts, WA, where the BC coastline briefly
juts down below the 49th parallel.

I considered submitting this, but I knew that Mark has a proclivity for
submitting Canada and I didn't want to collide. Ironically, if I had done so
it wouldn't only have affected his placement and not mine.

> I've never heard of Carpaccio, but an appetizer named for a painter
> can't
> taste too bad

Wafer thin raw beef in oil. Tastes pretty good, but I never figured out how
they can get it past the health inspectors.

> -------------------------------------------------------------------------
> 8. Name a person who invented a widely used computer algorithm.
>
> Paul Barrett HTTPS/SSL

I wonder where you would draw the line between an algorithm and a protocol?
(Of course it's possible that you may have to invent one while creating the
other.)

> -------------------------------------------------------------------------
> 9. Name a brand of gasoline or petrol that is no longer sold.
>
> Esso is incorrect because it is still sold by Imperial Oil in Canada:
>
>
http://www.imperialoil.ca/Canada-English/Products/Fuels...
>
> I guess they never joined the ExxonMobile juggernaut.

And in Britain too, IIRC. This frequently manifests itself as a crossword
puzzle clue (Exxon abroad).

Andrew
December 2, 2004 1:34:33 PM

Archived from groups: rec.puzzles,rec.games.trivia (More info?)

"Kevin Stone" <newsaccount@HotPOP.com> wrote in message
news:3176ilF37taq9U1@individual.net...
> > 5. Name a current country with two separate pieces, and where people
> > can drive between the two pieces, but to drive you MUST cross a
> > country border. The pieces can dependent territories.
> >
> > 2 United Kingdom
>
> Where?
>
> Drive and cross a country border. I live in the UK and I can't think of
> anywhere.
>
The "correct" answer given was Gibralter. I considered this for my (in the
end non-existant) entry, but I realised that it cannot be correct.

If you accept that travel via the channel tunnel counts as driving, then you
must accept other forms of vehicle transport, such as ferries. You could
conceiveably catch a ferry direct from mainland UK to Gibralter.

However, having seen the following in the results script:

> Campobello Island (an FDR favorite) has a seasonal ferry that avoids
> the
> trip into the US, but I judged the answer correct because if you're
> out
> of season, you must drive into Maine (and cross customs).

I fail to see how that can be correct. If there is an option to avoid the US
then how can the it be that you "MUST" cross a country border? Obviously the
large number of unique answers is explained by the fact that even wrong
answers are marked correct.
Anonymous
December 2, 2004 2:10:07 PM

Archived from groups: rec.puzzles,rec.games.trivia (More info?)

gdv1000@hotmail.com schrieb:
> Kevin Stone wrote:
> > > 5. Name a current country with two separate pieces, and where people
> > > can drive between the two pieces, but to drive you MUST cross a
> > > country border. The pieces can dependent territories.
> > >
> > > 2 United Kingdom

[Gibraltar]

> Well, you *could* drive through the Channel Tunnel, even if you're not
> allowed to. Would that count as "people can drive"? Besides, isn't a
> train driven as well as a car is?

You mean the train driver of the Eurostar could, if he got off work in
Paris and drove to Gibraltar for a vacation? ;) 

Cheers
Michael
--
Still an attentive ear he lent Her speech hath caused this pain
But could not fathom what she meant Easier I count it to explain
She was not deep, nor eloquent. The argon of the howling main
-- from Lewis Carroll: The Three Usenet Trolls
Anonymous
December 2, 2004 5:33:42 PM

Archived from groups: rec.puzzles,rec.games.trivia (More info?)

Jim Ward:
>>> 5. Name a current country with two separate pieces, and where people
>>> can drive between the two pieces, but to drive you MUST cross a
>>> country border. The pieces can dependent territories.

(sic)

>>> 2 United Kingdom

Kevin Stone:
>> Where?

"Simon":
> The "correct" answer given was [Gibraltar]. ... it cannot be correct.
>
> If you accept that travel via the channel tunnel counts as driving,
> then you must accept other forms of vehicle transport, such as ferries.

I agree with this objection. I can't see any way for the UK to be a
correct answer.

>> Campobello Island (an FDR favorite) has a seasonal ferry that avoids
>> the trip into the US, but I judged the answer correct because if
>> you're out of season, you must drive into Maine ...

> I fail to see how that can be correct.

Campobello Island was my answer. I didn't actually know about the ferry,
but if I had, I would have ignored it, because the question specified
driving, not boat travel. If the UK is ruled correct, then I think
my answer must be ruled wrong.
--
Mark Brader "He added a 3-point lead" is pronounced
Toronto differently in Snooker than in Typography...
msb@vex.net -- Liam Quin

My text in this article is in the public domain.
Anonymous
December 2, 2004 5:43:10 PM

Archived from groups: rec.puzzles,rec.games.trivia (More info?)

Jim Ward:
>>>> 5. Name a current country with two separate pieces, and where people
>>>> can drive between the two pieces, but to drive you MUST cross a
>>>> country border. The pieces can dependent territories.

>>>> 2 United Kingdom

Garmt de Vries:
>> ... isn't a train driven as well as a car is?

Michael Mendelsohn:
> You mean the train driver of the Eurostar could, if he got off work in
> Paris and drove to Gibraltar for a vacation? ;) 

The Channel Tunnel includes a service tunnel in which specialized road
vehicles run. (They drive on the left, in case you wondered. Not an
issue for the trains, as those drive on the left in both Britain and
France.) So one of the people whose job is to drive in the service
tunnel could drive from the British to the French end, then switch to
a car and drive to Gibraltar.

But this and Garmt's comment are both irrelevant unless there actually is
such a person among the entrants, because the question said "you".
--
Mark Brader, Toronto | "Common sense isn't any more common on Usenet
msb@vex.net | than it is anywhere else." --Henry Spencer

My text in this article is in the public domain.
Anonymous
December 2, 2004 5:59:45 PM

Archived from groups: rec.puzzles,rec.games.trivia (More info?)

Jim Ward:
>> 3. Name a painter who invented something unrelated to painting.
>>
>> 1 William Painter
...
>> William Painter was a Painter who never picked up a brush. ...

Andrew Krywaniuk:
> I considered this type of answer as well, but I wasn't sure how you
> would react to the difference in capitalization. I.e. is "a Painter"
> the same as "a painter"?

Of course not. This answer should be ruled wrong.

> (Of course, I wasn't sure how you would score a house painter
> either.)

I spent some time looking for a house painter who would be a correct
answer, but couldn't google one up.


>> 5. Name a current country with two separate pieces, and where people
>> can drive between the two pieces, but to drive you MUST cross a
>> country border. The pieces can dependent territories.
>>
>> 1 Canada
>>
>> Canada Campobello Island, New Brunswick
>
> There are certainly multiple possible reasons why Canada is a valid answer.
> For example, there is also Point Roberts, WA, where the BC coastline briefly
> juts down below the 49th parallel.

Harrumph! That's a reason why the US is a correct answer. Or not -- it
may be argued that since Point Roberts is joined to the rest of Washington
state by territorial waters, it doesn't qualify as a "separate piece".
Likewise for Northwest Angle, MN. I'm not aware of any other places that
make Canada a correct answer. For that matter, the "territorial waters"
objection counts against Campobello Island too.

> I considered submitting this, but I knew that Mark has a proclivity for
> submitting Canada and I didn't want to collide. Ironically, if I had done
> so it wouldn't only have affected his placement and not mine.

I thought Canada was a rather clever answer (as to whether it's correct,
see above and another branch of the thread), because everyone knows about
the connectivity of Point Roberts, not to mention Alaska, but Campobello
Island is rather less well known in that respect. It would have been
ironic if Andrew *had* submitted Canada for the wrong reason, been
ruled correct, and degraded my score...

>> Esso is incorrect because it is still sold by Imperial Oil in Canada:
>> I guess they never joined the ExxonMobile juggernaut.

It surprised me when Esso didn't change to Exxon in Canada, because I'd
read that when the company chose the new name Exxon, one criterion was
that they could have exclusive rights to it everywhere in the world.

(The reason for changing in the first place was that they had been using
different names in different parts of the US. "Esso" is derived from
S.O., and part of the Standard Oil antitrust ruling of 1911 limited the
use of the name; but they had originally decided to stay with the familiar
name in areas where they were allowed to use it.)
--
Mark Brader "HE'S the brains of the outfit."
Toronto "What does that make you?"
msb@vex.net "What else? An executive!"
-- the Rocky & Bullwinkle show
My text in this article is in the public domain.
Anonymous
December 2, 2004 6:59:00 PM

Archived from groups: rec.puzzles,rec.games.trivia (More info?)

Jim Ward <tomcatpolka@NyOaShPoAoM.com> wrote in message news:<udmsq0l1k6t9himujre9dfnf7el5n2fqfg@4ax.com>...

> 6. Name a current country that administers an island, and the island
> is more than 100 miles away from the country's mainland.
>
> 2 United Kingdom
>
> Country Administers these islands
> ------- --------------------------------
> United Kingdom Bahamas

The UK is a correct answer on account of numerous other islands,
including Bermuda, British Virgin Islands, Cayman Islands, Falkland
Islands, Pitcairn Island, South Georgia and the South Sandwich
Islands, Tristan da Cunha, and Turks and Caicos Islands. The Bahamas,
however, has been an independent country since 1973.

Regardless of whether this information was provided by the entrants or
added by the contest administrator, though, this wouldn't affect the
scoring since the question asked only for the name of the
administering country.

Joshua Kreitzer
gromit82@hotmail.com
Anonymous
December 2, 2004 9:38:14 PM

Archived from groups: rec.puzzles,rec.games.trivia (More info?)

In article <com0pq$2a4$1@reader1.panix.com>, tool@panix.com (Dan Blum)
wrote:

> In rec.puzzles Harold Buck <no_one_knows@comcast.net> wrote:
> > In article
> > <no_one_knows-B262ED.21373901122004@comcast.dca.giganews.com>,
> > Harold Buck <no_one_knows@comcast.net> wrote:
>
> > > In article <udmsq0l1k6t9himujre9dfnf7el5n2fqfg@4ax.com>,
> > > Jim Ward <tomcatpolka@NyOaShPoAoM.com> wrote:
> > >
> > > > 1 Fighting Quakers
> > >
> > >
> > > That's an oxymoron. What school is that supposed to be?
> > >
>
>
> > Whoops, I didn't see the comment later. Penn, huh? I guess they missed
> > the lesson where you learn that Quakers are pacifists.
>
> There's this thing called a "joke" you may want to look into at some
> point.


Just because Ivy League football is a joke doesn't mean that they should
mock religious beliefs with their team name.

--Harold Buck


"I used to rock and roll all night,
and party every day.
Then it was every other day. . . ."
-Homer J. Simpson
Anonymous
December 2, 2004 9:43:15 PM

Archived from groups: rec.puzzles,rec.games.trivia (More info?)

In article <10quafup8ohv86f@corp.supernews.com>,
msb@vex.net (Mark Brader) wrote:

> Jim Ward:
> >>>> 5. Name a current country with two separate pieces, and where people
> >>>> can drive between the two pieces, but to drive you MUST cross a
> >>>> country border. The pieces can dependent territories.
>
> >>>> 2 United Kingdom
>
> Garmt de Vries:
> >> ... isn't a train driven as well as a car is?
>
> Michael Mendelsohn:
> > You mean the train driver of the Eurostar could, if he got off work in
> > Paris and drove to Gibraltar for a vacation? ;) 
>
> The Channel Tunnel includes a service tunnel in which specialized road
> vehicles run. (They drive on the left, in case you wondered. Not an
> issue for the trains, as those drive on the left in both Britain and
> France.) So one of the people whose job is to drive in the service
> tunnel could drive from the British to the French end, then switch to
> a car and drive to Gibraltar.
>
> But this and Garmt's comment are both irrelevant unless there actually is
> such a person among the entrants, because the question said "you".


Couldn't you quit your job, move to England, work hard, and get a job as
a Chunnel employee? Well, maybe you can't, but maybe the person
answering "Gibralter" could.

In fact, a quadrapalegic (sp?) enswering this question might have no
correct answers at all.

--Harold Buck


"I used to rock and roll all night,
and party every day.
Then it was every other day. . . ."
-Homer J. Simpson
Anonymous
December 2, 2004 11:24:03 PM

Archived from groups: rec.puzzles,rec.games.trivia (More info?)

Mark Brader schrieb:
> Jim Ward:
> >>>> 5. Name a current country with two separate pieces, and where people
> >>>> can drive between the two pieces, but to drive you MUST cross a
> >>>> country border. The pieces can dependent territories.

> Michael Mendelsohn:
> > You mean the train driver of the Eurostar could, if he got off work in
> > Paris and drove to Gibraltar for a vacation? ;) 

> But this and Garmt's comment are both irrelevant unless there actually is
> such a person among the entrants, because the question said "you".

If you're that literal, I think that since the question is stated in the
present tense, your answer would be ruled correct or not depending on
whether the ferry was actually running on (or near) the day of the
deadline.

http://www.quoddyloop.com/ferrydi-ci-ep.htm suggests that ferry
operations cease in early September.

Cheers
Michael
--
Still an attentive ear he lent Her speech hath caused this pain
But could not fathom what she meant Easier I count it to explain
She was not deep, nor eloquent. The argon of the howling main
-- from Lewis Carroll: The Three Usenet Trolls
Anonymous
December 2, 2004 11:51:09 PM

Archived from groups: rec.puzzles,rec.games.trivia (More info?)

On Thu, 2 Dec 2004 10:34:33 -0000, "Simon" <dont@bother.com> wrote:

>"Kevin Stone" <newsaccount@HotPOP.com> wrote in message
>news:3176ilF37taq9U1@individual.net...
>> > 5. Name a current country with two separate pieces, and where people
>> > can drive between the two pieces, but to drive you MUST cross a
>> > country border. The pieces can dependent territories.
>> >
>> > 2 United Kingdom
>>
>> Where?
>>
>> Drive and cross a country border. I live in the UK and I can't think of
>> anywhere.
>>
>The "correct" answer given was Gibralter. I considered this for my (in the
>end non-existant) entry, but I realised that it cannot be correct.
>
>If you accept that travel via the channel tunnel counts as driving, then you
>must accept other forms of vehicle transport, such as ferries. You could
>conceiveably catch a ferry direct from mainland UK to Gibralter.

I too considered it for an entry that ever appeared (partly as I got
bogged down with worrying about this!).

I think that there is a difference to a ferry, and it's that you are
effectively parked on a ferry - you can get out, walk round the deck,
have a sandwich etc. On the tunnel trains you remain in your car,
locked in a steel box. So although you are not actually driving, you
have to remain in your car throughout.

Still arguable though, but at least different to a ferry.


--
On-line canal route planner: http://www.canalplan.org.uk

(Waterways World site of the month, April 2001)
Anonymous
December 2, 2004 11:54:50 PM

Archived from groups: rec.puzzles,rec.games.trivia (More info?)

Jim Ward (tomcatpolka@NyOaShPoAoM.com) writes:
> Campobello Island (an FDR favorite) has a seasonal ferry that avoids the
> trip into the US, but I judged the answer correct because if you're out
> of season, you must drive into Maine (and cross customs). More at:
>...
> Ceuta and Melilla win for the most borders to cross to drive to (I
> didn't count them).

If ferries count, I would assume that Ceuta and Melilla are out. I would
assume that you take a direct ferry there.

Not that it matters for the contest. Llvia is a Spanish enclave in France.

But if ferries counts, Croatia is probably out. There is at least a
car ferry from Ploce to Trpanj on the Pejlsac peninsula, which permits
you to avoid the border crossings abour Neum.

> A country that wasn't picked was Brunei.

Another country that wasn't picked is Chile. And Chile is an interesting
answer, because in this case there are no isolated enclaves. If you
like you can walk the way from Puerto Natales to Aisén (take proper
equipment!). But if we are talking about driving, you need to go
through Argentina.

(However, if ferries count you can probably take the car on the boat
up to Puerto Montt.)

There are of course more possible answers: The Netherlands, Azerbaidzjan,
Tajikistan, Italy to name a few.


--
Erland Sommarskog, Stockholm, esquel@sommarskog.se
Anonymous
December 3, 2004 12:19:51 AM

Archived from groups: rec.puzzles,rec.games.trivia (More info?)

"Nick Atty" <nospam@nandj.freeserve.co.uk> wrote in message
news:tgvuq0t87bb8f8vs3r3d3i7ha1se33ihsq@4ax.com...
> On Thu, 2 Dec 2004 10:34:33 -0000, "Simon" <dont@bother.com> wrote:
>
> >"Kevin Stone" <newsaccount@HotPOP.com> wrote in message
> >news:3176ilF37taq9U1@individual.net...
> >> > 5. Name a current country with two separate pieces, and where people
> >> > can drive between the two pieces, but to drive you MUST cross a
> >> > country border. The pieces can dependent territories.
> >> >
> >> > 2 United Kingdom
> >>
> >> Where?
> >>
> >> Drive and cross a country border. I live in the UK and I can't think of
> >> anywhere.
> >>
> >The "correct" answer given was Gibralter. I considered this for my (in
the
> >end non-existant) entry, but I realised that it cannot be correct.
> >
> >If you accept that travel via the channel tunnel counts as driving, then
you
> >must accept other forms of vehicle transport, such as ferries. You could
> >conceiveably catch a ferry direct from mainland UK to Gibralter.
>
> I too considered it for an entry that ever appeared (partly as I got
> bogged down with worrying about this!).
>
> I think that there is a difference to a ferry, and it's that you are
> effectively parked on a ferry - you can get out, walk round the deck,
> have a sandwich etc. On the tunnel trains you remain in your car,
> locked in a steel box. So although you are not actually driving, you
> have to remain in your car throughout.

Well, no you don't have to, actually.

> Still arguable though, but at least different to a ferry.

If it's correct that it's possible to drive through the service tunnel
(without changing vehicles) then the answer is valid. Otherwise not.

Adrian
Anonymous
December 3, 2004 1:19:46 AM

Archived from groups: rec.puzzles,rec.games.trivia (More info?)

"Kevin Stone" wrote:

>> 5. Name a current country with two separate pieces, and where people
>> can drive between the two pieces, but to drive you MUST cross a
>> country border. The pieces can dependent territories.
>>
>> 2 United Kingdom
>
> Where?
>
> Drive and cross a country border. I live in the UK and I can't think
> of anywhere.

As I started this discussion I feel I should end it...

The point I was making wasn't driving to France - which I accept one can do.
I didn't realise that there was now a road joining Spain to Gibraltar. So I
retract my original point.

--
Kev
Anonymous
December 3, 2004 1:21:38 AM

Archived from groups: rec.puzzles,rec.games.trivia (More info?)

My answer to the driving question was Croatia.
Croatia is a country with two separate pieces. Many
other answers are countries with several separate
pieces.
Anonymous
December 3, 2004 1:50:19 AM

Archived from groups: rec.puzzles,rec.games.trivia (More info?)

Mark Brader:
> > But this and Garmt's comment are both irrelevant unless there actually is
> > such a person among the entrants, because the question said "you".

Michael Mendelsohn:
> If you're that literal, I think that since the question is stated in the
> present tense, your answer would be ruled correct or not depending on
> whether the ferry was actually running on (or near) the day of the
> deadline.

But nothing was said about a time limit on the trip. If ferries *do*
count, why can't I "drive" there by driving to the ferry dock and waiting
until spring?
--
Mark Brader, Toronto "Beware the Calends of April also."
msb@vex.net -- Peter Neumann
Anonymous
December 3, 2004 4:00:49 AM

Archived from groups: rec.puzzles,rec.games.trivia (More info?)

Jim Ward wrote:

> When counting stars, I can tally up to 10 stars with current
> flags, but I can't find an 11 star flag without going
> historical. Can we continue up to 30 without using US
> "Stars and Stripes" flags?

Looking only at current national and 1st-level subnational flags,
the list below shows what I've found. I haven't looked at every
nation's subnational flags, so there may be some that can fill in
the gaps.

1 Chile
2 Panama
3 Burundi
4 Micronesia
5 China
6 Australia
7 Venezuela
8 Alaska
9 Tuvalu
10 Cape Verde
11 Ponape (Micronesia)
12 Uzbekistan
13 Rhode Island
14 Risaralda (Colombia)
15 Cook Islands
16 Neuquen (Argentina)
17 Ohio
18
19 Indiana
20
21 Manabi (Ecuador)
22
23
24 Viseu (Portugal)
25 Amazonas (Brazil)
26
27 Brazil
28
29 Arkansas
30 Magdalena (Colombia)

40 Chuuk (Micronesia)

50 USA

--
Dan Tilque
Anonymous
December 3, 2004 11:58:59 AM

Archived from groups: rec.puzzles,rec.games.trivia (More info?)

Mark Brader wrote:

> I thought Canada was a rather clever answer (as to whether it's correct,
> see above and another branch of the thread), because everyone knows about
> the connectivity of Point Roberts, not to mention Alaska, but Campobello
> Island is rather less well known in that respect. It would have been
> ironic if Andrew *had* submitted Canada for the wrong reason, been
> ruled correct, and degraded my score...

I rather doubt that I was going to going to enter Canada on the basis of an
incorrect answer. My memory of my thought processes from several weeks ago
is rather fallible.

In retrospect, I think I considered entering the US on the basis of Point
Roberts and one other small enclave on the North side of one of the Great
Lakes. (I can't find any info about it now, but I once saw some segment on
TV about how they wanted to secede from the US and join Canada.) But then I
realized that the US would be a really dumb answer on account of Alaska.

I did consider *researching* whether Canada was a correct answer, but
decided not to on the basis that Mark would be likely to enter it.

Andrew
Anonymous
December 3, 2004 12:07:26 PM

Archived from groups: rec.puzzles,rec.games.trivia (More info?)

Jim Ward wrote:
> Here are the results of the Rare Entries JFW07 contest.
>-------------------------------------------------------------------------
....
> 8. Name a person who invented a widely used computer algorithm.
>
....
> Turner Whitted Computer Graphics

Turner Whitted wrote the paper which popularized Ray Tracing, but he
did not invent the algorithm. I would score this as wrong. Ed Catmull
would have been a much better answer for a computer graphics algorithm
inventer, as his subdivision algorithm for rendering curved surfaces
using a Z-buffer is implemented in every self-respecting graphics card
today.

Or perhaps you are refering to a different "widely used" computer
algorithm invented by Turner Whitted?


O.P.

The state flag of Oregon displays 34 stars, can you find them all?

---
Chuck Grant
Anonymous
December 3, 2004 12:43:45 PM

Archived from groups: rec.puzzles,rec.games.trivia (More info?)

Chuck Grant wrote:

>
> The state flag of Oregon displays 34 stars, can you find them
> all?

Well, 33 are obvious but I can't see a 34th. Unless you mean the
setting sun on the seal. But in vexillology, a sun is not the
same as a star.

Other additions to the list:

34 Kansas
48 Missouri

--
Dan Tilque
Anonymous
December 3, 2004 12:50:42 PM

Archived from groups: rec.puzzles,rec.games.trivia (More info?)

In article <udmsq0l1k6t9himujre9dfnf7el5n2fqfg@4ax.com>, "Jim Ward"
<tomcatpolka@nyoashpoaom.com> wrote:

> -------------------------------------------------------------------------
> 2. Name a TIME magazine "Person of the Year" that was not an
> individual person.
>
> Question 2 Answers
>
> Correct:
>
> 4 The Middle Americans
> 2 Ronald Reagan and Yuri Andropov
> 2 U.S. Scientists
> 1 American Women
> 1 Apollo Astronauts
> 1 Bill Clinton and Kenneth Starr
> 1 Generalissimo and Madame Chiang Kai-Shek
> 1 Hungarian Freedom Fighter
> 1 The American Soldier
> 1 The Computer
> 1 The Two George Bushes
> 1 Young People
>
> Person of the Year Year
> ---------------------------------------- ----
American Women 1975
Apollo Astronauts 1968
Bill Clinton and Kenneth Starr 1998
Generalissimo and Madame Chiang Kai-Shek 1937
Hungarian Freedom Fighter 1956
Ronald Reagan and Yuri Andropov 1983
The American Soldier 2003
The Computer 1982
The Middle Americans 1969
The Two George Bushes 1990
U.S. Scientists 1960
Young People 1966
>
> The "Apollo Astronauts" are also given as "American Astronauts". On the
> cover were Anders, Borman and Lovell. "Young People" are also given as
> "Twenty-Five and Under",
>
> I accepted "The Two George Bushes" because if Time wanted to honor the
> President instead of his psyche, they would've awarded it to him
> outright.
> The accompanying article shows Time was in earnest about the conceit:
>
> http://www.time.com/time/personoftheyear/archive/storie...
>
> Reminds me of flip-flops ...

ObPuzzle: Based on these groups (are there any more?) what is the maximum number of
times a real person has been a member of the Person/Man of the Year
group? Someone could be a young person (1966), Middle American (1969),
woman (1975), and soldier (2003). Conceivably she could also be a
scientist (1960) but are any 1960 scientists also 2003 soldiers?

What is the maximum number of times someone who was specifically named as
Person (Man) of the Year has been a member of the winning group?
Anonymous
December 3, 2004 4:00:30 PM

Archived from groups: rec.puzzles,rec.games.trivia (More info?)

Dan Tilque wrote:

> Jim Ward wrote:
>
>> When counting stars, I can tally up to 10 stars with current
>> flags, but I can't find an 11 star flag without going
>> historical. Can we continue up to 30 without using US
>> "Stars and Stripes" flags?
>
> Looking only at current national and 1st-level subnational
> flags, the list below shows what I've found.

Update after doing a bit more research. I found I'd made a
mistake in the other list. Neuquen province of Argentina has 18
stars, not 16. Plus there's a few additions.

1 Chile
2 Panama
3 Burundi
4 Micronesia
5 China
6 Australia
7 Venezuela
8 Alaska
9 Tuvalu
10 Cape Verde
11 Ponape (Micronesia)
12 Uzbekistan
13 Rhode Island
14 Risaralda (Colombia)
15 Cook Islands
16
17 Ohio
18 Neuquén (Argentina)
19 Indiana
20 Suchitepequez (Guatemala) [1]
21 Manabi (Ecuador)
22 Usulután (El Salvador)
23
24 Viseu (Portugal)
25 Amazonas (Brazil)
26
27 Brazil
28
29 Arkansas
30 Magdalena (Colombia)
31 Lugansk (Ukraine)
32
33 Oregon
34 Kansas

40 Chuuk (Micronesia)

48 Missouri

50 USA

58 San José (Uruguay) [2]

-------
[1] no flag -- coat of arms has 20 stars. Since many subnational
flags have the coat of arms on them, if this department ever
adopts a flag, it will likely have the 20 stars.

[2] FotW has 58, but says the number is how many municipalities
are in the department which is unknown.
Anonymous
December 3, 2004 4:04:52 PM

Archived from groups: rec.puzzles,rec.games.trivia (More info?)

"Chuck Grant" <fx4m@fx4m.con> wrote in message news:h1Wrd.602450$mD.606@attbi_s02...
>
> > 8. Name a person who invented a widely used computer algorithm.

> > Turner Whitted Computer Graphics
>
> Turner Whitted wrote the paper which popularized Ray Tracing, but he
> did not invent the algorithm. ...

Gee Chuck, that was my answer, and I was relying on

http://www.scope.at/program/speakers/whitted.html

which seemed authoritative
Anonymous
December 3, 2004 5:55:44 PM

Archived from groups: rec.puzzles,rec.games.trivia (More info?)

Andrew Krywaniuk:
> In retrospect, I think I considered entering the US on the basis of Point
> Roberts and one other small enclave on the North side of one of the Great
> Lakes. (I can't find any info about it now, but...)

The term "enclave" is not really correct, since Point Roberts and the
two other places like that are not surrounded by Canadian territory.
They just don't have a *land* connection to the main part of the land
of their respective states.

The other two are Northwest Angle, MN, and the Alburg Peninsula, VT.
Andrew is probably thinking of Northwest Angle, which is actually on
the west side of Lake of the Woods, not on one of the Great Lakes.

The Alburg Peninsula is less well known, and is irrelevant to the
question, because bridges across the lake water allow it to be
reached by car without leaving US territory. It's on the north
end of Lake Champlain, which actually was officially added to the
Great Lakes (for political reasons) by an American law in 1998, but
this designation didn't last long.

> I did consider *researching* whether Canada was a correct answer, but
> decided not to on the basis that Mark would be likely to enter it.

Aha.
--
Mark Brader, Toronto | "Mark is probably right about something,
msb@vex.net | but I forget what" -- Rayan Zachariassen

My text in this article is in the public domain.
Anonymous
December 3, 2004 11:41:01 PM

Archived from groups: rec.puzzles,rec.games.trivia (More info?)

Mark Brader schrieb:
> Mark Brader:
> > > But this and Garmt's comment are both irrelevant unless there actually is
> > > such a person among the entrants, because the question said "you".
>
> Michael Mendelsohn:
> > If you're that literal, I think that since the question is stated in the
> > present tense, your answer would be ruled correct or not depending on
> > whether the ferry was actually running on (or near) the day of the
> > deadline.
>
> But nothing was said about a time limit on the trip. If ferries *do*
> count, why can't I "drive" there by driving to the ferry dock and waiting
> until spring?

Because you'd have to stop posting to rec.puzzles, and we'd miss you?

Cheers
Michael
--
Still an attentive ear he lent Her speech hath caused this pain
But could not fathom what she meant Easier I count it to explain
She was not deep, nor eloquent. The jargon of the howling main
-- from Lewis Carroll: The Three Usenet Trolls
Anonymous
December 4, 2004 2:47:08 AM

Archived from groups: rec.puzzles,rec.games.trivia (More info?)

Clay Blankenship wrote:

>What is the maximum number of times someone who was specifically named as
>Person (Man) of the Year has been a member of the winning group?

Three - and it's only been done once, as far as I know: Franklin
Roosevelt (1932, 1934, 1941).

(And Clay, assuming you used your real E-mail address, don't you get
(a) a lot of spam/porn/whatnot, and (b) a lot of heat from your
higher-ups for posting on a DoD computer?)

-- Don
Anonymous
December 4, 2004 1:47:49 PM

Archived from groups: rec.puzzles,rec.games.trivia (More info?)

"Mark Brader" <msb@vex.net> wrote in message
news:10r0vjgrt77rt9a@corp.supernews.com...

> The other two are Northwest Angle, MN, and the Alburg Peninsula, VT.
> Andrew is probably thinking of Northwest Angle, which is actually on
> the west side of Lake of the Woods, not on one of the Great Lakes.

Yes, you are probably right that it was the Northwest Angle. The wikipedia
link (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Northwest_Angle) even mentions that the
idea of secession from the US is occasionally raised.

Andrew
Anonymous
December 6, 2004 5:02:09 AM

Archived from groups: rec.puzzles,rec.games.trivia (More info?)

gerson wrote:
> "Chuck Grant" <fx4m@fx4m.con> wrote in message news:h1Wrd.602450$mD.606@attbi_s02...
>
>>> 8. Name a person who invented a widely used computer algorithm.
>
>
>>>Turner Whitted Computer Graphics
>>
>>Turner Whitted wrote the paper which popularized Ray Tracing, but he
>>did not invent the algorithm. ...
>
>
> Gee Chuck, that was my answer, and I was relying on
>
> http://www.scope.at/program/speakers/whitted.html
>
> which seemed authoritative
>
>

He invented recursive ray tracing, not ray tracing in general.
I was there when he presented the paper at SIGGRAPH. It was a
REALLY big hit. It was one of the most memorable moments in the
history of computer graphics. His (very) short film "the compleate
angler" brought the house down.

But computer graphics using non-recursive ray tracing was already
in use at the time (although by very few).
And after a moment's reflection, I clearly see that recursive ray
tracing is easily widely enough used to make Turner Whitted
a valid answer. I withdraw my objection, and all claims to sanity.

Chuck
Anonymous
December 6, 2004 5:18:51 AM

Archived from groups: rec.puzzles,rec.games.trivia (More info?)

Dan Tilque wrote:

> Chuck Grant wrote:
>
>
>>The state flag of Oregon displays 34 stars, can you find them
>>all?
>
>
> Well, 33 are obvious but I can't see a 34th. Unless you mean the
> setting sun on the seal. But in vexillology, a sun is not the
> same as a star.
>
> Other additions to the list:
>
> 34 Kansas
> 48 Missouri
>
> --
> Dan Tilque
>
>

Of course! it was a trick question. The word "star" has many meanings.
The sun qualifies as an example of the astronomical meaning. The five
pointed ones are also abstract representations of the astronomical ones,
they are just less specific.
If I could have found a flag with a picture of a movie star or rock star
I would have included that in the question too.

Chuck
Anonymous
December 6, 2004 2:20:24 PM

Archived from groups: rec.puzzles,rec.games.trivia (More info?)

"Chuck Grant" <fx4m@fx4m.con> wrote

(I wrote)
> > ... I was relying on
> >
> > http://www.scope.at/program/speakers/whitted.html
> >
> > which seemed authoritative

> I was there ..
Interesting !

I tried some googling, and went -
(without the trailing "e")

google
"the compleat angler" whitted

but, taking the first one, it doesn't say any thing about the
film being funny (?brought the house down)

What happened ? Why was it funny ?

> ...His (very) short film "the compleate
> angler" brought the house down.

> ... I withdraw my objection, and all claims to sanity.

her-yuk :-)
Anonymous
December 7, 2004 11:23:07 PM

Archived from groups: rec.puzzles,rec.games.trivia (More info?)

On Thu, 02 Dec 2004 21:19:51 GMT, "Adrian Bailey" <dadge@hotmail.com>
wrote:

>If it's correct that it's possible to drive through the service tunnel
>(without changing vehicles) then the answer is valid. Otherwise not.

I agree with Mark Brader, Adrian Bailey, and others that boat travel
and train travel are not driving. Upon further investigation,

http://www.engineering.com/content/ContentDisplay?conte...

says about the Chunnel: "The smaller service tunnel (4.8 metres
diameter) is located between the two rail tunnels and is equipped with
a wire guidance system for specially designed service tunnel
vehicles."

Since special vehicles are used, this invalidates driving through the
service tunnel, which implies that United Kingdom is a wrong answer
for question 5. The new answer slate, with the top 3 unchanged is:

Rank Score Name 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9
---- ------- -------------------- --- --- --- --- --- --- --- --- ---
1 1 Garmt de Vries 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1
1 1 Mark Brader 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1
3 2 Andrew Krywaniuk 1 1 1 2 1 1 1 1 1
4 4 Eugene van der Pijll 1 1 2 2 1 1 1 1 1
5 8 Lardy Girl 1 4 2 1 1 1 1 1 1
6 12 John Gerson 2 2 1 1 1 3 1 1 1
6 12 Julie Waters 3 1 1 1 2 1 2 1 1
8 16 Bill Daly 2 4 1 1 1 2 1 1 1
9 24 Glen Prideaux 1 2 2 1 2 3 1 1 1
9 24 Joshua Kreitzer 1 1 2 3 1 2 1 2 1
11 34 Edmund Lewis 1 1 2 1 w 1 1 1 1
12 48 Robin Rattay 1 2 2 2 3 1 2 1 1
13 144 Kevin Stone 1 1 2 3 3 2 2 2 1
14 204 John Hindge 1 2 1 1 w 3 2 1 1
14 204 John Newmark 3 1 2 2 w 1 1 1 1
16 432 Stuart Allen 3 4 2 3 3 1 2 1 1
17 544 Lieven Marchand 1 4 2 1 1 2 2 1 w
---------------------------------------------------------------------
Question Average: 1.5 1.9 1.6 1.6 4.3 1.6 1.4 1.1 1.9

I still accepting William Painter as a painter, and Turner Whitted
as an algorithm inventor.

P.S. I also apologize for all formatting glitches! I am still figuring
out why my new cut and paste doesn't work.
Anonymous
December 8, 2004 12:44:46 AM

Archived from groups: rec.puzzles,rec.games.trivia (More info?)

Jim Ward wrote:

>
>> 16
>
> Caqueta Department (Colombia)
> http://fotw.vexillum.com/flags/co-caq.html

Very good. I thought I'd looked at all of Colombia's department
flags, but that doesn't look familiar. At any rate, I had earlier
miscounted Neuquen's stars as being 16, so I may have seen this
one but then not listed it.

>
>> 23
>
> Vice President of Brazil
> http://www.fahnenversandshop.de/fotw/flags/br_pres.html

That one actually has 52 stars. Notice the coat of arms in the
upper left. It's the same as the one on the Presidential flag
above it except that the Southern Cross has been unaccountably
(and probably mistakenly) reversed. The arms have 29 stars; add
to the 23 to get 52.

The Rear Admiral flag on the page below has 23.

>
>> 26
>
> Admiral of the Brazilian Fleet
> http://www.fotw.us/flags/br~%5Efo.html
>
> I can't find any more. :( 

But you did a good job filling in some holes.

--
Dan Tilque
Anonymous
December 8, 2004 8:22:04 AM

Archived from groups: rec.puzzles,rec.games.trivia (More info?)

Jim Ward wrote:
>I agree with Mark Brader, Adrian Bailey, and others that [...]
>train travel are not driving.

But what if you're a train driver?

--
Neil Sunderland
Braunton, Devon

Please observe the Reply-To address
Anonymous
December 8, 2004 12:59:17 PM

Archived from groups: rec.puzzles,rec.games.trivia (More info?)

In article <10rd56gq6oshu92@corp.supernews.com>,
"Dan Tilque" <dtilque@nwlink.com> wrote:

> >
> >> 26
> >
> > Admiral of the Brazilian Fleet
> > http://www.fotw.us/flags/br~%5Efo.html
> >
> > I can't find any more. :( 
>
> But you did a good job filling in some holes.
>


How many times have I heard that?

--Harold Buck


"I used to rock and roll all night,
and party every day.
Then it was every other day. . . ."
-Homer J. Simpson
Anonymous
December 8, 2004 10:09:53 PM

Archived from groups: rec.puzzles,rec.games.trivia (More info?)

On Fri, 03 Dec 2004 09:07:26 GMT, Chuck Grant <fx4m@fx4m.con> wrote:

>The state flag of Oregon displays 34 stars, can you find them all?

One of them is rising?

Can you identify these people of the year?

'36 Wallis Warfield Simpson
'55 Harlow Herbert Curtice
'78 Teng Hsiao-P'ing

I notice that the Oregon flag has a different obverse than reverse.
Are there others?
Anonymous
December 9, 2004 12:49:34 AM

Archived from groups: rec.puzzles,rec.games.trivia (More info?)

On Wed, 08 Dec 2004 19:09:53 -0500, Jim Ward
<tomcatpolka@NyOaShPoAoM.com> wrote:

>I notice that the Oregon flag has a different obverse than reverse.
>Are there others?

http://www.fotw.us/flags/flagtwos.html

Massachusetts, Paraguay, Saudi Arabia, USSR among others.
Anonymous
December 9, 2004 11:32:55 PM

Archived from groups: rec.puzzles,rec.games.trivia (More info?)

"Jim Ward" <tomcatpolka@NyOaShPoAoM.com> wrote in message
news:5k5fr0pc8d3fn8dj4erh1s7p7ueo6m6hn6@4ax.com...
>
> >The state flag of Oregon displays 34 stars, can you find them all?
>
> One of them is rising?
>
> Can you identify these people of the year?
>
> '36 Wallis Warfield Simpson
> '55 Harlow Herbert Curtice
> '78 Teng Hsiao-P'ing


Now more commonly known as Deng Xiaoping


--
Richard
Anonymous
December 10, 2004 9:59:18 PM

Archived from groups: rec.puzzles,rec.games.trivia (More info?)

On Thu, 09 Dec 2004 11:46:46 -0500, Jeffrey Turner
<jturner@localnet.com> wrote:

>> '55 Harlow Herbert Curtice

He was the Bill Gates of 1955 = the President of GM:

"Beneath all the glitter, Curtice is regarded by friends as
essentially still the small-town boy who came out of Petrieville,
Mich. He likes to watch the fights and The $64,000 Question on
television, read the papers, hunt, watch the Detroit Tigers (the night
games only). He puffs casually on Luckies, likes his Scotch and soda
strong and unstirred. His idea of Saturday fun in Flint is a run
through the Buick plant in the morning and a poker game with his City
Club cronies in the afternoon. He lives in a relatively modest red
brick corner house, with a three-car garage. In the garage: his wife's
Buick Roadmaster convertible, daughter Dorothy Anne's Buick Century
convertible, and his personal, flashy Buick Skylark convertible, now
being hopped up with a new experimental engine and transmission."

http://www.time.com/time/poy2000/archive/1955.html
!