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Windows 7 RC Useful for 13 Months

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May 1, 2009 5:06:53 PM

Gah, spare computer... tempting to install.... must resist....
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Anonymous
a b $ Windows 7
May 1, 2009 5:09:46 PM

I don't care if Microsoft is being charitable or not, it's just good business. It benefits consumers, who'll have a more favorable impression (in turn benefiting Microsoft). Besides, it's unlikely that everybody would wait till June to upgrade.
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May 1, 2009 5:10:08 PM

I think that the more friendly and open to people they are, the better responses they will get and ultimately a better product will be released.
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Anonymous
a b $ Windows 7
May 1, 2009 5:10:25 PM

I have installed RC upgrading from Beta, and so far, it looks good. One nice improvement over the Beta is that you can turn off the UAC, while still having the sidebar visible. I won't wait until June 2010, as soon as rtm is available i will go for it.
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May 1, 2009 5:10:36 PM

Im sick of vista to be honest. It always felt like a new skirt for Windows xp... Wasn't worth the money.

Windows 7 looks amazing. Going to try out the RC for sure.
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May 1, 2009 5:20:01 PM

Its a big ol trialware. Once people upgrade to 7 for free, they won't want to go back to Vista or XP. At that time they will turn windows 7 paying customer, or windows 7 pirate.
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May 1, 2009 5:35:34 PM

downixGah, spare computer... tempting to install.... must resist....

Why not? That's what spare computers are for -- messing around with! :D 

I'm probably going to install the RC on my primary machine, which is currently running Vista.
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May 1, 2009 5:46:47 PM

I will install it dual boot on my Mac Mini and probably use it as my primary OS on my gaming machine.
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May 1, 2009 6:02:47 PM

This is the same as how they give out free licenses to students. Like the selling drugs analogy. First hit is free to hook the consumer.
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May 1, 2009 6:31:55 PM

hmm WinCrack
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May 1, 2009 6:34:21 PM

I love Vista and wasn't that impressed with Windows 7. It's basically just Vista with a different theme and some cool little tricks you can do with your mouse. I had 7 installed for a weekend and immediatly went back to Vista after having some issues with Blu-ray playback, If they can fix these issues, as well as let me use the graphics of my 4890 with the PhysX of my 8800, than I'm sold. I'm not going to upgrade because of ill feelings towards Vista though, I love it and I really dont see what all the complaints were about. I turned off UAC and the security warnings about UAC being off and never looked back.
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May 1, 2009 6:46:35 PM

Had 7 and went back to Vista? I suppose if Blu-ray was a problem, then it was necessary, but I'm surprised you didn't see a major performance boost. I have an AMD 9850BE quad-core box with 4GB of RAM. I had Vista 32-bit Ultimate on it, and have now put on Windows 7 x64 in a dual-boot configuration. It's possible that upgrading to 64-bit had something to do with it, but my computer is now so fast, I doubt I will ever go back to my Vista partition. If anything, when the RTM release comes out, I'll wipe out my Vista partition and install it there to convert over from the beta/RC build. Other than a single BSOD I got trying to enable the Crystalizer in the Sound Blaster X-Fi driver (which I blame on the beta driver, not Windows itself), I haven't had any trouble at all getting all my apps and hardware to work with it.
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May 1, 2009 7:06:47 PM

Oh no, ivorycruncher, now you'll get a million responses about how 64-bit is not faster than 32-bit from angry 32-bit fanbois! But maybe its possible it has something to do with the memory addressing (maybe windows slows down with 4GB and a 32-bit OS).

I can't imagine its a good idea to put Win 7 RC on a primary-use machine. If I recall, they don't want people upgrading from Beta to RC, and I personally hate re-installing from scratch. It is tempting to fire up my old P4 and give it a go.
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May 1, 2009 7:29:28 PM

im definitly going to DL this :D 
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May 1, 2009 7:34:22 PM

I think Microsoft is finally realizing it no longer has the OS market under its thumb and starting to use good marketing strategy. Like it was stated in the article, the longer users have the free copy of Windows 7, the more dependent they'll become. This is probably the only reason Linux even exists outside of business server rooms and enthusiast developer machines. Now I'm wondering if Apple will follow a similar strategy too so I can finally try out OS X =)
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May 1, 2009 7:37:15 PM

I think Microsoft is finally realizing it no longer has the OS market under its thumb and starting to use good marketing strategy. Like it was stated in the article, the longer users have the free copy of Windows 7, the more dependent they'll become. This is probably the only reason Linux even exists outside of business server rooms and enthusiast developer machines. Now I'm wondering if Apple will follow a similar strategy too so I can finally try out OS X =)
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May 1, 2009 7:48:13 PM

@hellwig

That's why I said that x64 MIGHT have had something to do with it, but I'm guessing not much since pretty much all my apps are still 32-bit. And btw, I previously had 2GB of RAM under Vista, and upgraded to 4GB (yes, I know it can only address 3GB in 32-bit; I was preparing for x64) because Guild Wars appears to have a bit of a memory leak that flooded my machine into virtual memory after a couple hours of gameplay. It did give me a noticeable speed boost, but it was still sluggish overall. Windows 7 is just way faster, no matter which way you look at it. I also have 7 32-bit on an old Dell Latitude D600 with a Pentium M 1.6GHz CPU and 768MB of RAM. Aside from lacking Aero capability, it runs very well (I dare say even a little better than XP)! I once tried putting Vista on that exact same model of laptop, and it was what I would consider barely usable.

As for running it on my main machine, I held off putting the beta on it, but the post-beta builds have proven to run very smoothly on my test boxes, and since I had a spare partition on a secondary hard drive (which was actually my old XP installation before switching to Vista), I had nothing to lose by setting up a dual-boot. All I have to do to get rid of it is reset my boot loader and delete the Windows 7 partition. My test boxes are a bit on the weak side, so I wanted to see how it would do on a true custom-built performance PC. Having used it several days now, I'm guessing I'll be running this build until the RTM comes out (maybe even until the RC time-bombs out), and I bet I won't ever have any need or desire to reboot into my Vista partition.
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May 1, 2009 7:57:46 PM

Windows XP -> Vista changes = Better thread scheduling, better driver model, ability to use GPU for rendering desktop items, thread priorities for media/data transactions (Your music won't stop playing because your doing some heavy computation in another program etc.).

Vista -> Win7 changes = Improved Vista driver model, Improved GPU Rendering of desktop, Improved threaded desktop rendering, changed way desktop handles Graphics Memory.

Those are some of the major changes I know there are more, but most of the more descriptive changes are usually only understood and apply to programmers and most people don't seem to appreciate/see the changes unless you point them out with examples.
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May 1, 2009 8:03:58 PM

i think this is a SMART move on M$'s part. they are turning around their negative publicity and everyone benefits. they are going to get more loyal customer with this new practice model and i sure hell will be one of them! finally, they are listening to the users and it's paying off!
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Anonymous
a b $ Windows 7
May 1, 2009 8:09:34 PM

I think it's a nice gesture of MS.
With this it is really being a help to those who want to know more of the OS, without pushing them to activate or register within 3 days.

Basically, especially in the beginning a lot of illegal versions of the OS are spreading the internet, many of which need that time to be convinced if the OS is good enough.
Now they can do that with ease of mind, knowing they are not breaking the law, at least not for a year, and still reaping the benefits of the newer OS.
There's a saying that says:

If you want to get a product, first reach out your hand to give cash.
That's a nice gesture. Totally opposite to first demanding users to pay before they can actually have an Os that might not suit their needs.

It's a bit in the lines of WOW. Download and play WOW for free for a couple of days, after which you need to purchase.

Users running illegal OSes have no more excuses apart from not having enough cash to pay to buy an OS(which they normally will be able to get in this couple of months time).
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May 1, 2009 8:19:22 PM

Sure, you can use it for a year, but if it's not going to be patched, why would you want to?
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May 1, 2009 9:42:29 PM

Why would you say it's not gonna be patched? It's in testing, that's why microsoft is doing this well and the other reasons (imo all of them in the article not just a certain one). Microsoft wants users to feel good about this os really good since vista took such nasty hit at first.
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May 2, 2009 4:50:24 AM

Honestly people, this is nothing new. When Vista came out, it was the same thing. They release the betas and RCs for free, with a set timebomb for deactivation after the RTM comes out. If memory serves, those builds were good for several months to a year as well. I'm just glad that the Windows 7 RC feels so finished, when Vista, even in its current form, still feels like an incomplete beta.
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May 2, 2009 5:24:29 AM

HothrIts a big ol trialware. Once people upgrade to 7 for free, they won't want to go back to Vista or XP. At that time they will turn windows 7 paying customer, or windows 7 pirate.


I orignially obtained Win7 via my cannons and rum.
But since then I have made it legit.
Getting the RC build legit will be nice.

I didn't even bother with setting it on my secondary computer.
Just repartitioned it, lost all my files, but backed up some important stuff.
Then I accidentally destroyed my backups by reformatting my USB. >_>
However, since then, running the build 7000x64 has done well for me.
Except for trying to use MagicIso... that failed, horribly. Yay for convenient restore points.

Go Win7 all the way!
I'll likely go and pay for it in 13 months.
Its got my hooked.

Such an easy transition straight form XPx32 also.
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May 2, 2009 7:59:56 AM

I WOULD install Windows 7 RC on my desktop, but my game saves would be wiped, and that's something I wouldn't want to happen.

Ah. Maybe when I reformat it sometime in June. Then Windows 7 RC will be on this machine.
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May 2, 2009 5:20:34 PM

Is it just me or have Microsoft been worryingly charitable as of late? Microsoft being kind makes me a bit nervous.
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May 3, 2009 3:53:39 AM

13 and 7... how ironic
anyways i will be definitely be downloading the rc on cinco de mayo
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May 3, 2009 11:07:46 PM

ivorycruncherHad 7 and went back to Vista? I suppose if Blu-ray was a problem, then it was necessary, but I'm surprised you didn't see a major performance boost. I have an AMD 9850BE quad-core box with 4GB of RAM. I had Vista 32-bit Ultimate on it, and have now put on Windows 7 x64 in a dual-boot configuration. It's possible that upgrading to 64-bit had something to do with it, but my computer is now so fast, I doubt I will ever go back to my Vista partition. If anything, when the RTM release comes out, I'll wipe out my Vista partition and install it there to convert over from the beta/RC build. Other than a single BSOD I got trying to enable the Crystalizer in the Sound Blaster X-Fi driver (which I blame on the beta driver, not Windows itself), I haven't had any trouble at all getting all my apps and hardware to work with it.


I have vista ultimate 64. one major reason for your speed boost was moving to 64 bit. i used xp 32 adn 64 on the same comp and it was amasing how much faster 64 bit was over 32 bit. As far as a speed difference from vista to 7 i expect none personaly.
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May 4, 2009 12:10:21 AM

Quote:
I have vista ultimate 64. one major reason for your speed boost was moving to 64 bit. i used xp 32 adn 64 on the same comp and it was amasing how much faster 64 bit was over 32 bit. As far as a speed difference from vista to 7 i expect none personaly.


I beg to differ on not seeing a speed boost. I've installed Windows 7 32-bit on machines that previously had Vista 32-bit, and there was quite a noticeable improvement in speed. Case in point, a Dell Optiplex GX280 I used at my last job, wuth a P4 2.8GHz single core CPU and 2GB of RAM. Vista ran like a dog on that thing, but when I installed the Windows 7 beta, it because actually usable again. Trust me, they haven't been doing nothing the past 3+ years in the performance department. Granted, the speed increase will probably be more noticeable on older, slower PCs, but it's there no matter what.

Seriously guys, give Windows 7 a chance. It's not another blunder like Vista. This is a serious product, which performs very well and is years beyond XP in security, plus it has new features that make it easier than ever for consumers to install and configure hardware and peripherals. Try it and see the changes for yourself before you judge it.
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May 4, 2009 8:58:51 AM

I didnt say it didnt have a speed boost i just said i doubt it. Vista was no blunder for me i personaly love the OS and ill be getting windows 7 when it comes out. The only problem i have ever had with vista was how they had sound controls. It always set my mic to lin in as the source and the only way i could ever change it was on my soundblaster extras software. On every other comp that has no sound blaster i had to just say screw it and get a usb headset cuz i for the life of me cannot get a mic to work on vista. other then that i have had no issues at all running vista. I hope windows 7 adds on to all the nice things vista has.
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a b $ Windows 7
May 4, 2009 1:06:01 PM

Finally, good strategy from Microsoft. Given the, umm, widespread hesitation of more serious users to adopt Vista, Microsoft is letting us kick the tires and test drive in hopes that we will actually like one of their releases, instead of being forced into it.
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May 4, 2009 1:37:16 PM

ivorycruncherHad 7 and went back to Vista? I suppose if Blu-ray was a problem, then it was necessary, but I'm surprised you didn't see a major performance boost. I have an AMD 9850BE quad-core box with 4GB of RAM. I had Vista 32-bit Ultimate on it, and have now put on Windows 7 x64 in a dual-boot configuration. It's possible that upgrading to 64-bit had something to do with it, but my computer is now so fast, I doubt I will ever go back to my Vista partition. If anything, when the RTM release comes out, I'll wipe out my Vista partition and install it there to convert over from the beta/RC build. Other than a single BSOD I got trying to enable the Crystalizer in the Sound Blaster X-Fi driver (which I blame on the beta driver, not Windows itself), I haven't had any trouble at all getting all my apps and hardware to work with it.


Totally, 64 bit is the way to go if you got the hardware headroom. I used to run Vista 32 bit with 2gb ram. I purchased 4gb and run Vista 64 bit. The thing just flies, no headaches, no freezing, no problems at all. Boot-up is just a bit slow, but my pc is loaded with crapware at startup (skype, msn, xfire, webcamthing, sidebar, rocketdock, x-fi software, garena and hamachi)
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May 4, 2009 7:41:18 PM

hmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmm looks like MS trying to wipe out their bad memories....... sneaky
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May 5, 2009 9:59:06 AM

I don't think I will install this. I love my Vista 64-bit, never had any problems, and I suspect Windows 7 is getting high praise ONLY from regular users because of lack of default nagging UAC and faster system start (which is really nothing important).
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May 5, 2009 2:56:17 PM

Quote:
I don't think I will install this. I love my Vista 64-bit, never had any problems, and I suspect Windows 7 is getting high praise ONLY from regular users because of lack of default nagging UAC and faster system start (which is really nothing important).


*sigh* I wasn't going to respond to this thread anymore, but I really hate it when people make stupid assumptions like this, thinking they know everything. I am anything BUT a "regular user." I was building PCs before I was out of high school, and have been doing IT work ever since, through college (workstudy program) and beyond. I have about 5 PCs of various vintage in my place right now, all custom built by yours truly (except the laptop). Two of the newest ones and the laptop were previously running Vista, and now they are running Windows 7 RC. Even when sticking with 32-bit Windows 7, the performance improvements are remarkable, and I'm not just talking about bootup time and UAC improvements. Everything about it just feels snappier and more responsive, things that used to lag no longer do, and Aero is more fluid then ever. In case you didn't know (or forgot), Microsoft has made performance the #1 top priority in their development of Windows 7.

If Vista works fine for you, then go ahead and wait until the final release of Windows 7 is up for sale, but trust me, you WILL want to upgrade to it once it's out. I suspect that while XP may still linger on a while, Vista sales will die very, very quickly after the release of Windows 7. It really is just that good.
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May 5, 2009 3:39:29 PM

@ivorycruncher: (don't like quoting long posts)

You're right, it's just an assumption of mine, but to call it "stupid" is an insult.
But nevermind that, you made certain points, which other people who claim to have used Windows 7 beta did not. I am also in IT business for a long time (since 1994) and I have seen many versions, and it was ALWAYS the same thing: people dissing newer Windows and praising old (and a year later, LAUGHING at people still using older one).
Then Vista came, culminated this trend (adding its own huge blunder that is UAC), and a year later still not getting enough praise (in my opinion, reason is not being such a leap forward like WinXp to Win98)
This though, such unanimous high opinion from beta testers - is a surprising thing, but I was (and I still am) afraid it's only a response to a "cleaner" Windows to a bit of a resource hog that is Vista.
"Snappier" response sounds good, but if I can't see more than that, it cannot make me (an older guy) waste some time and energy installing it in a moment, when there is little support for various hardware I use. Vista brought DirectX10 (sadly, supported very little by software companies), Readyboost and Aero. What Windows 7 REALLY brings us? I'm afraid it brings us nothing much, but effort to take back customers driven away by long bootup and UAC.

P.S.
I WILL try it out though, WHEN I have some spare time :) 
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May 5, 2009 4:24:22 PM

You're right, I shouldn't have called it stupid, and I apologize for that.

That aside, hearing "such unanimous high opinion from beta testers" should tell you something. This version of Windows is so much more than a cleanup of Vista. In Vista, much appeared to have been changed simply for the sake of change, and a lot of it didn't make much sense, or really offer any new benefit. Although Windows 7 is not perfect, you can definitely see changes that work towards a goal of truly making the OS more user-friendly. There are LOTS of new features in it. I don't know if I'd go so far as to say they're innovations, but they are definitely much-needed and long-overdue features that are a welcome sight for sore eyes.

The new hardware/peripheral management features alone almost make it worth the upgrade. They are really striving to develop a true plug-n-play environment, where you never have to worry about installing special software for a peripheral. You just plug it in, and it works. Linking bluetooth devices used to be very tedious, but Windows 7 found my generic bluetooth transceiver automatically, and the add hardware wizard treated my bluetooth devices just like any other peripheral, making for an effortless installation that didn't require any clumsy third-party software. And the interface for installing, configuring, and troubleshooting all your hardware and peripherals is very clean and user-friendly (unlike the Device Manager).

Also, multimedia is a big focus with the new Windows Media Player and Media Center apps better than ever. Plus, support for many newer audio/video codecs is now built-in, including the H.264 video codec, which means you typically won't have to go searching for codecs to install, which can be a nightmare for some typical users who don't even know what a codec is. This is definitely the version of Windows you want for a home theater PC.

So, there is MUCH more to Windows 7 than just cheap tricks to try and win back users who got disgusted with Vista. With Vista behind them, they've had over 3 years to really take it to a new level. Honestly, I was probably as skeptical as you were until the first time I installed the beta, at which point I got blown away by how good it was already. Please do try it. I think you will be pleasantly surprised. =)
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