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External hard drive backup question

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Anonymous
March 23, 2005 3:09:09 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.help_and_support (More info?)

I have just bought an external hard drive to backup my main internal drive
on my computer.

I have not even opened the box, but my question is the procedure to do the
backup---just hook up the USB 2.0 and copy? Or is there backup software to
deal with? I thought that somewhere in XP there is a transfer utility, but
required some other connective media rather that USB. Also, after the
transfer is complete, I plan on just disconnecting the drive and storing it
away until another incremental backup is needed. Or should I just leave it
hooked up?

Any tips and advice along these lines appreciated--

Incidentally, I learned the hard way about backing up large hard drives to
removable media such as CD-R's or CD-RW. Then I noticed how cheap external
drives are compared to the media costs and unreliable media. Dumb me. Not
to mention the aggravation factor when you get to CD #22 after 5-6 hours and
the backup software reports a problem and aborts the backup!!! Happened
FIVE times!!! Twice with CD-R's. 44 CD's and 50 bucks down the drain, half
the cost of the external HDD!

I'm still pissed off about it----

TIA
Anonymous
March 23, 2005 1:03:27 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.help_and_support (More info?)

"Ferdy" wrote:
>
> (snip) I have not even opened the box, but my
> question is the procedure to do the backup---just
> hook up the USB 2.0 and copy? Or is there
> backup software to deal with? (snip)


Yep, you'll need some type of backup software. The specific location of
many files on the drive is stored in the registry, which will change if data
is simply copied back and forth.


> I thought that somewhere in XP there is a transfer
> utility, but required some other connective media
> rather that USB. (snip)


The old Windows "Backup" has not really kept up that well with changing
storage technologies. As such, you may find its capabilities somewhat
limited.


> Also, after the transfer is complete, I plan on just
> disconnecting the drive and storing it away until
> another incremental backup is needed. Or should
> I just leave it hooked up? (snip)


If you want a reliable backup, never leave the backup drive connected.
While connected, it is vulnerable to viruses, computer breakdowns, and so
on. Disconnect the drive when the backup is complete and store it away in a
secure place. That also reduces the wear and tear on the drive, increasing
it reliability.

Stewart
March 23, 2005 1:03:28 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.help_and_support (More info?)

One can consider two different approaches to 'backing-up' a working system

1. Use an application [backup] that attempts to 'copy' the entire contents
of your hard disk, or specific files and folders. Windows Backup will
perform such a function, however it will fail to copy any files [ .exe, .dll
and others] that are 'open' or in use. This will create a 'compressed' file
that maintains all the relevant information.

2. Use a disk imagine or 'cloning' application that will make an copy of the
entire disk to a second partition or disk drive. This could be Ghost or
another application.

I recommend that you use option 2, because in the event of a total disk
failure or even non-working operating syste, you can use you Ghosted image to
recreate the entire system disk in less than the time it would take to
reinstall XP. After the installation, then you could use restore to write
back to the target drive all the data 'backed up'.



"Dwight Stewart" wrote:

> "Ferdy" wrote:
> >
> > (snip) I have not even opened the box, but my
> > question is the procedure to do the backup---just
> > hook up the USB 2.0 and copy? Or is there
> > backup software to deal with? (snip)
>
>
> Yep, you'll need some type of backup software. The specific location of
> many files on the drive is stored in the registry, which will change if data
> is simply copied back and forth.
>
>
> > I thought that somewhere in XP there is a transfer
> > utility, but required some other connective media
> > rather that USB. (snip)
>
>
> The old Windows "Backup" has not really kept up that well with changing
> storage technologies. As such, you may find its capabilities somewhat
> limited.
>
>
> > Also, after the transfer is complete, I plan on just
> > disconnecting the drive and storing it away until
> > another incremental backup is needed. Or should
> > I just leave it hooked up? (snip)
>
>
> If you want a reliable backup, never leave the backup drive connected.
> While connected, it is vulnerable to viruses, computer breakdowns, and so
> on. Disconnect the drive when the backup is complete and store it away in a
> secure place. That also reduces the wear and tear on the drive, increasing
> it reliability.
>
> Stewart
>
>
>
Related resources
Anonymous
March 23, 2005 1:03:29 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.help_and_support (More info?)

OK, thanks, this gets me started.

Doing a search on MajorGeeks.com, there are several "mirroring" type
programs to create an exact image of the main drive to the secondary drive.

Can anyone recommend the best ones?

Thanks again--
"BAR" <BAR@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
news:5A65C1D6-725D-4CAB-AC6C-7CDCDFDA16FC@microsoft.com...
> One can consider two different approaches to 'backing-up' a working system
>
> 1. Use an application [backup] that attempts to 'copy' the entire contents
> of your hard disk, or specific files and folders. Windows Backup will
> perform such a function, however it will fail to copy any files [ .exe,
> .dll
> and others] that are 'open' or in use. This will create a 'compressed'
> file
> that maintains all the relevant information.
>
> 2. Use a disk imagine or 'cloning' application that will make an copy of
> the
> entire disk to a second partition or disk drive. This could be Ghost or
> another application.
>
> I recommend that you use option 2, because in the event of a total disk
> failure or even non-working operating syste, you can use you Ghosted image
> to
> recreate the entire system disk in less than the time it would take to
> reinstall XP. After the installation, then you could use restore to write
> back to the target drive all the data 'backed up'.
>
>
>
> "Dwight Stewart" wrote:
>
>> "Ferdy" wrote:
>> >
>> > (snip) I have not even opened the box, but my
>> > question is the procedure to do the backup---just
>> > hook up the USB 2.0 and copy? Or is there
>> > backup software to deal with? (snip)
>>
>>
>> Yep, you'll need some type of backup software. The specific location of
>> many files on the drive is stored in the registry, which will change if
>> data
>> is simply copied back and forth.
>>
>>
>> > I thought that somewhere in XP there is a transfer
>> > utility, but required some other connective media
>> > rather that USB. (snip)
>>
>>
>> The old Windows "Backup" has not really kept up that well with
>> changing
>> storage technologies. As such, you may find its capabilities somewhat
>> limited.
>>
>>
>> > Also, after the transfer is complete, I plan on just
>> > disconnecting the drive and storing it away until
>> > another incremental backup is needed. Or should
>> > I just leave it hooked up? (snip)
>>
>>
>> If you want a reliable backup, never leave the backup drive connected.
>> While connected, it is vulnerable to viruses, computer breakdowns, and so
>> on. Disconnect the drive when the backup is complete and store it away in
>> a
>> secure place. That also reduces the wear and tear on the drive,
>> increasing
>> it reliability.
>>
>> Stewart
>>
>>
>>
Anonymous
March 23, 2005 1:03:29 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.help_and_support (More info?)

A couple of other questions before I get started, please.

Will the new drive be pre-formatted to NTFS standard, correctly partitioned
and ready? Will the imaging software take care of this?

Also, is there a way to boot from the secondary hard drive to test the
backup's reliability and integrity?

TIA, again



"BAR" <BAR@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
news:5A65C1D6-725D-4CAB-AC6C-7CDCDFDA16FC@microsoft.com...
> One can consider two different approaches to 'backing-up' a working system
>
> 1. Use an application [backup] that attempts to 'copy' the entire contents
> of your hard disk, or specific files and folders. Windows Backup will
> perform such a function, however it will fail to copy any files [ .exe,
> .dll
> and others] that are 'open' or in use. This will create a 'compressed'
> file
> that maintains all the relevant information.
>
> 2. Use a disk imagine or 'cloning' application that will make an copy of
> the
> entire disk to a second partition or disk drive. This could be Ghost or
> another application.
>
> I recommend that you use option 2, because in the event of a total disk
> failure or even non-working operating syste, you can use you Ghosted image
> to
> recreate the entire system disk in less than the time it would take to
> reinstall XP. After the installation, then you could use restore to write
> back to the target drive all the data 'backed up'.
>
>
>
> "Dwight Stewart" wrote:
>
>> "Ferdy" wrote:
>> >
>> > (snip) I have not even opened the box, but my
>> > question is the procedure to do the backup---just
>> > hook up the USB 2.0 and copy? Or is there
>> > backup software to deal with? (snip)
>>
>>
>> Yep, you'll need some type of backup software. The specific location of
>> many files on the drive is stored in the registry, which will change if
>> data
>> is simply copied back and forth.
>>
>>
>> > I thought that somewhere in XP there is a transfer
>> > utility, but required some other connective media
>> > rather that USB. (snip)
>>
>>
>> The old Windows "Backup" has not really kept up that well with
>> changing
>> storage technologies. As such, you may find its capabilities somewhat
>> limited.
>>
>>
>> > Also, after the transfer is complete, I plan on just
>> > disconnecting the drive and storing it away until
>> > another incremental backup is needed. Or should
>> > I just leave it hooked up? (snip)
>>
>>
>> If you want a reliable backup, never leave the backup drive connected.
>> While connected, it is vulnerable to viruses, computer breakdowns, and so
>> on. Disconnect the drive when the backup is complete and store it away in
>> a
>> secure place. That also reduces the wear and tear on the drive,
>> increasing
>> it reliability.
>>
>> Stewart
>>
>>
>>
March 24, 2005 1:37:16 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.help_and_support (More info?)

"Ferdy" <fredjr1@bellsouth.net> wrote in message
news:0I70e.72265$%Y4.61140@bignews6.bellsouth.net...
>I have just bought an external hard drive to backup my main internal drive
>on my computer.
>
> I have not even opened the box, but my question is the procedure to do the
> backup---just hook up the USB 2.0 and copy? Or is there backup software
> to deal with? I thought that somewhere in XP there is a transfer utility,
> but required some other connective media rather that USB. Also, after the
> transfer is complete, I plan on just disconnecting the drive and storing
> it away until another incremental backup is needed. Or should I just
> leave it hooked up?
>
> Any tips and advice along these lines appreciated--
>
> Incidentally, I learned the hard way about backing up large hard drives to
> removable media such as CD-R's or CD-RW. Then I noticed how cheap
> external drives are compared to the media costs and unreliable media.
> Dumb me. Not to mention the aggravation factor when you get to CD #22
> after 5-6 hours and the backup software reports a problem and aborts the
> backup!!! Happened FIVE times!!! Twice with CD-R's. 44 CD's and 50
> bucks down the drain, half the cost of the external HDD!
>
> I'm still pissed off about it----
>
> TIA
>
Thanks for your good timing. I recently Bought Ghost 9.0 on sale for $20
during a super BestBuys sale. Everything I had read said it would backup to
DVD's and also do Incremental backups. TRUE but it didn't say that it
wouldn't do incremental backups to DVD. Damn them!
Off this morning to buy a 120 external Western Digital there for $80.
Good luck
SG
Anonymous
March 24, 2005 4:01:50 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.help_and_support (More info?)

Shakey,

I would highly recommend Acronis True Image over Norton's Ghost--this was
recommended here and if you go to cnet.com and read the reviews, you'll see
why.

I have the trial version with my new external Maxtor, and it's worked great.

Question, though, to group---why does acronis partition the secondary
external drive in FAT 32? Why not NTFS? As a matter of fact, I didn't
think FAT 32 was even possible on a drive that big (80 GB).


"shakey" <shakey@sonic.net> wrote in message
news:uY5TACKMFHA.1472@TK2MSFTNGP14.phx.gbl...
>
> "Ferdy" <fredjr1@bellsouth.net> wrote in message
> news:0I70e.72265$%Y4.61140@bignews6.bellsouth.net...
>>I have just bought an external hard drive to backup my main internal drive
>>on my computer.
>>
>> I have not even opened the box, but my question is the procedure to do
>> the backup---just hook up the USB 2.0 and copy? Or is there backup
>> software to deal with? I thought that somewhere in XP there is a
>> transfer utility, but required some other connective media rather that
>> USB. Also, after the transfer is complete, I plan on just disconnecting
>> the drive and storing it away until another incremental backup is needed.
>> Or should I just leave it hooked up?
>>
>> Any tips and advice along these lines appreciated--
>>
>> Incidentally, I learned the hard way about backing up large hard drives
>> to removable media such as CD-R's or CD-RW. Then I noticed how cheap
>> external drives are compared to the media costs and unreliable media.
>> Dumb me. Not to mention the aggravation factor when you get to CD #22
>> after 5-6 hours and the backup software reports a problem and aborts the
>> backup!!! Happened FIVE times!!! Twice with CD-R's. 44 CD's and 50
>> bucks down the drain, half the cost of the external HDD!
>>
>> I'm still pissed off about it----
>>
>> TIA
>>
> Thanks for your good timing. I recently Bought Ghost 9.0 on sale for $20
> during a super BestBuys sale. Everything I had read said it would backup
> to DVD's and also do Incremental backups. TRUE but it didn't say that it
> wouldn't do incremental backups to DVD. Damn them!
> Off this morning to buy a 120 external Western Digital there for $80.
> Good luck
> SG
>
Anonymous
March 24, 2005 9:33:10 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.help_and_support (More info?)

"BAR" wrote:
>
> (snip) I recommend that you use option 2, because
> in the event of a total disk failure or even non-
>working operating system, you can use you Ghosted
> image to recreate the entire system disk in less than
> the time it would take to reinstall XP. (snip)


I use the disk image/cloning method also (Norton Ghost). Luckily, I've
only had to rebuild my computer once using a backup, but this method did
work perfectly that single time.

Stewart
March 24, 2005 11:23:05 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.help_and_support (More info?)

"Ferdy" <fredjr1@bellsouth.net> wrote in message
news:r3E0e.62086$Q83.23424@bignews5.bellsouth.net...
> Shakey,
>
> I would highly recommend Acronis True Image over Norton's Ghost--this was
> recommended here and if you go to cnet.com and read the reviews, you'll
> see why.
Just came back with new WD drive.
Appreciate your Acronis/Ghost comment but I have Ghost now and at a super
savings. Also having looked over the internet and chatrooms I find it to be
a matter of personal preferences. I see/here haters/lovers of both programs.
SG
March 24, 2005 11:23:06 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.help_and_support (More info?)

Just discovered that new WD external HD also came with Dantz Retrospect
Express baqckup software.
More options for me now.
SG
!