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wireless card a/b/g/ protocols

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  • Wireless
  • Laptops
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Anonymous
a b F Wireless
a b D Laptop
January 17, 2005 8:40:42 PM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

I'm looking at the several choices of wireless card for a Dell 9200 laptop.
Does anyone know what is the difference between a/b/g protocols?
Thank you.
Steffo

More about : wireless card protocols

Anonymous
a b F Wireless
a b D Laptop
January 17, 2005 8:40:43 PM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

"Steffo" <steffo@nospam.com> wrote in message
news:41ebea8c_2@news.bluewin.ch...
| I'm looking at the several choices of wireless card for a Dell 9200
laptop.
| Does anyone know what is the difference between a/b/g protocols?
| Thank you.
| Steffo
|

802.11 Standards - 802.11b 802.11a 802.11g
http://compnetworking.about.com/cs/wireless80211/a/aa80...

--
D

I'm not an MVP a VIP nor do I have ESP.
I was just trying to help.
Please use your own best judgment before implementing any suggestions or
advice herein.
No warranty is expressed or implied.
Your mileage may vary.
See store for details. :) 

Remove shoes to E-mail.
Anonymous
a b F Wireless
a b D Laptop
January 17, 2005 9:07:07 PM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

Thank you very much!

HillBillyBuddhist wrote:
> "Steffo" <steffo@nospam.com> wrote in message
> news:41ebea8c_2@news.bluewin.ch...
>> I'm looking at the several choices of wireless card for a Dell 9200
>> laptop. Does anyone know what is the difference between a/b/g
>> protocols? Thank you.
>> Steffo
>>
>
> 802.11 Standards - 802.11b 802.11a 802.11g
> http://compnetworking.about.com/cs/wireless80211/a/aa80...
Related resources
Anonymous
a b F Wireless
a b D Laptop
January 17, 2005 10:46:08 PM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

802.11a is obsolete.
802.11b is really adequate for 90+% of SOHO users.
802.11g is faster.
802.11g with "turbo" is fastest of all.

But when your internet connection is slower than the slowest 802.11, what
difference does it make which one you have? Well, avoid 802.11a anyway.

.... Ben Myers

On Mon, 17 Jan 2005 17:40:42 +0100, "Steffo" <steffo@nospam.com> wrote:

>I'm looking at the several choices of wireless card for a Dell 9200 laptop.
>Does anyone know what is the difference between a/b/g protocols?
>Thank you.
>Steffo
>
>
Anonymous
a b F Wireless
a b D Laptop
January 17, 2005 10:46:09 PM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

It makes a huge difference if you share files in your house. Go with G.

Tom
<ben_myers_spam_me_not @ charter.net (Ben Myers)> wrote in message
news:41ec14e0.23214771@nntp.charter.net...
> 802.11a is obsolete.
> 802.11b is really adequate for 90+% of SOHO users.
> 802.11g is faster.
> 802.11g with "turbo" is fastest of all.
>
> But when your internet connection is slower than the slowest 802.11, what
> difference does it make which one you have? Well, avoid 802.11a anyway.
>
> ... Ben Myers
>
> On Mon, 17 Jan 2005 17:40:42 +0100, "Steffo" <steffo@nospam.com> wrote:
>
>>I'm looking at the several choices of wireless card for a Dell 9200
>>laptop.
>>Does anyone know what is the difference between a/b/g protocols?
>>Thank you.
>>Steffo
>>
>>
>
Anonymous
a b F Wireless
a b D Laptop
January 17, 2005 10:46:09 PM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

In article <41ec14e0.23214771@nntp.charter.net>, ben_myers_spam_me_not @
charter.net (Ben Myers) says...

> 802.11a is obsolete.

I beg to differ. 802.11a found wide use in industrial
environments. I know that a friend of mine is still using it, and I know
you can still buy hardware that speaks it.

It's uncommon to find it in the 'consumer' arena, but I would
hardly use the 'O' word. "Obsolete," to me, means that no one, anywhere
on the planet, is using it for any purpose. That's certainly not the
case with 802.11a.

> difference does it make which one you have? Well, avoid 802.11a anyway.

All the multi-standard wireless cards I've come across to date
support 802.11a. There's really no point in trying to avoid it.

Keep the peace(es).


--
Dr. Anton T. Squeegee, Director, Dutch Surrealist Plumbing Institute.
(Known to some as Bruce Lane, ARS KC7GR,
kyrrin (a/t) bluefeathertech[d=o=t]calm -- www.bluefeathertech.com
"If Salvador Dali had owned a computer, would it have been equipped
with surreal ports?"


----== Posted via Newsfeeds.Com - Unlimited-Uncensored-Secure Usenet News==----
http://www.newsfeeds.com The #1 Newsgroup Service in the World! >100,000 Newsgroups
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Anonymous
a b F Wireless
a b D Laptop
January 18, 2005 2:13:14 AM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

Right. File sharing is certainly better with g or Turbo g or whatever the
almost-ratified standard is called... Ben Myers

On Mon, 17 Jan 2005 15:30:25 -0500, "Tom Scales" <tomtoo@softhome.net> wrote:

>It makes a huge difference if you share files in your house. Go with G.
>
>Tom
><ben_myers_spam_me_not @ charter.net (Ben Myers)> wrote in message
>news:41ec14e0.23214771@nntp.charter.net...
>> 802.11a is obsolete.
>> 802.11b is really adequate for 90+% of SOHO users.
>> 802.11g is faster.
>> 802.11g with "turbo" is fastest of all.
>>
>> But when your internet connection is slower than the slowest 802.11, what
>> difference does it make which one you have? Well, avoid 802.11a anyway.
>>
>> ... Ben Myers
>>
>> On Mon, 17 Jan 2005 17:40:42 +0100, "Steffo" <steffo@nospam.com> wrote:
>>
>>>I'm looking at the several choices of wireless card for a Dell 9200
>>>laptop.
>>>Does anyone know what is the difference between a/b/g protocols?
>>>Thank you.
>>>Steffo
>>>
>>>
>>
>
>
Anonymous
a b F Wireless
a b D Laptop
January 18, 2005 8:10:19 AM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

<ben_myers_spam_me_not @ charter.net (Ben Myers)> wrote

> 802.11a is obsolete.

It is? I better trash my 802.11a WLAN. All of my 802.11a hardware is
D-Link, taking advantage of their proprietary 108 MBS "turbo mode". Of
course, actual throughput isn't 108 MBS, however I am capable of realtime
video editing/rendering across my WLAN. I haven't done any "benchmarks",
however I transfer enormous amount of data around, which has proven to be
seamless with 802.11a. Thats good enough for me. One of my friends that
has a Linksys 802.11g WLAN commented that file transfers on my WLAN
outperforms transfers on his.

> Well, avoid 802.11a anyway.

I wouldn't say "avoid it", however I probably would recommend 802.11g for
most "consumers" now -- simply because hardware is much more easily
available. Plus, all the new "cool stuff" such as "wireless media players"
are utilizing 802.11g. For anyone wanting simply a rock solid WLAN to
transfer enormous amount of data around, I'd probably recommend 802.11a to
them -- however it will require more effort to locate hardware and it will
be more expensive. I also prefer 802.11a because it operates at 5 Ghz,
which is a much less congested spectrum than 2.4 Ghz. As for the "range
limitation" with 802.11a, I view that as a "security feature". I have a
multimode (802.11a, 802.11b) router, which saturates nearly all of my house
with both bands (5 Ghz and 2.4 Ghz). At times, my neighbor can see a faint
802.11b signal coming my house (I can also, at times, pick his 802.11b up as
well), however he never sees my 802.11a.

Its not "obsolete", however most consumers would probably be better off with
802.11g. However, if large file transfers are intended (and/or
experiencing interference problems in 2.4 Ghz), then 802.11a is worth
consideration. Expect to pay top $$ though. As for accessing public
hotspots, my 802.11a card for my laptop is also capable of 802.11b -- so it
works just fine. I can't see using public hotspots for anything else than
internet access, which 802.11b is well adequate for.

Just wanted throw a few cents out, as I've been extremely pleased with
802.11a for my needs. :^)
Anonymous
a b F Wireless
a b D Laptop
January 18, 2005 8:13:55 AM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

There are some name-brand top-of-the-line 802.11b cards which have no clue about
802.11a. Examples? The Proxim/Agere/Lucent Orinoco Gold cards. Cisco Aironet
cards.

Agreed many 802.11g cards also handle 802.11a. But unless one wants VERY
restricted distances of transmission, there is no reason to go with 802.11a
unless it happens to be included in a card along with 802.11g. Same argument
holds for access points and wireless routers. 802.11g is the first choice with
802.11b also being nice to have for people who show up with 802.11b cards in
their notebooks.

By and large, the wifi and computer industries consider 802.11a obsolete due to
the restricted distances, whether or not it is used widely in certain
applications. Very few new 802.11a cards are being built these days, if any.
Used 802.11a devices are plentiful. Sort of like Intel's Socket 370 Pentium III
CPUs... Ben Myers

On Mon, 17 Jan 2005 15:42:07 -0800, Dr. Anton T. Squeegee
<SpammersAreVermin@dev.null> wrote:

>In article <41ec14e0.23214771@nntp.charter.net>, ben_myers_spam_me_not @
>charter.net (Ben Myers) says...
>
>> 802.11a is obsolete.
>
> I beg to differ. 802.11a found wide use in industrial
>environments. I know that a friend of mine is still using it, and I know
>you can still buy hardware that speaks it.
>
> It's uncommon to find it in the 'consumer' arena, but I would
>hardly use the 'O' word. "Obsolete," to me, means that no one, anywhere
>on the planet, is using it for any purpose. That's certainly not the
>case with 802.11a.
>
>> difference does it make which one you have? Well, avoid 802.11a anyway.
>
> All the multi-standard wireless cards I've come across to date
>support 802.11a. There's really no point in trying to avoid it.
>
> Keep the peace(es).
>
>
>--
>Dr. Anton T. Squeegee, Director, Dutch Surrealist Plumbing Institute.
>(Known to some as Bruce Lane, ARS KC7GR,
>kyrrin (a/t) bluefeathertech[d=o=t]calm -- www.bluefeathertech.com
>"If Salvador Dali had owned a computer, would it have been equipped
>with surreal ports?"
>
>
>----== Posted via Newsfeeds.Com - Unlimited-Uncensored-Secure Usenet News==----
>http://www.newsfeeds.com The #1 Newsgroup Service in the World! >100,000 Newsgroups
>---= East/West-Coast Server Farms - Total Privacy via Encryption =---
Anonymous
a b F Wireless
a b D Laptop
January 18, 2005 6:37:24 PM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

"N" I have a Belkin Pre-N, they claim it has 6 times the speed and 8
times the range. I do take all these claims with a grain of salt, but it
does work well. Cost is a bit prohibitive.
Paul


Ben Myers wrote:
> Right. File sharing is certainly better with g or Turbo g or whatever the
> almost-ratified standard is called... Ben Myers
>
> On Mon, 17 Jan 2005 15:30:25 -0500, "Tom Scales" <tomtoo@softhome.net> wrote:
>
>
>>It makes a huge difference if you share files in your house. Go with G.
>>
>>Tom
>><ben_myers_spam_me_not @ charter.net (Ben Myers)> wrote in message
>>news:41ec14e0.23214771@nntp.charter.net...
>>
>>>802.11a is obsolete.
>>>802.11b is really adequate for 90+% of SOHO users.
>>>802.11g is faster.
>>>802.11g with "turbo" is fastest of all.
>>>
>>>But when your internet connection is slower than the slowest 802.11, what
>>>difference does it make which one you have? Well, avoid 802.11a anyway.
>>>
>>>... Ben Myers
>>>
>>>On Mon, 17 Jan 2005 17:40:42 +0100, "Steffo" <steffo@nospam.com> wrote:
>>>
>>>
>>>>I'm looking at the several choices of wireless card for a Dell 9200
>>>>laptop.
>>>>Does anyone know what is the difference between a/b/g protocols?
>>>>Thank you.
>>>>Steffo
>>>>
>>>>
>>>
>>
>
!