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Change harddisk of Dell Latitude

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Anonymous
January 21, 2005 1:39:48 AM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

Hi.

I've a rather old Dell Latitude CPI D266Xt, where I'd like to change the
standard 4 GB harddisk against a newer one (bigger!). I've absolutely no
experience whatsoever regarding laptop harddisks. I only know it's IDE
and 2.5"

When looking at the shops (i.e. http://www.alternate.de), what do I have
to look out for in order not having any surprise after purchase?

Cache, RPM and access time is not relevant to me. I'm worried about the
physical connector as well as the the U-xxx speed.

Many thanks.

--
Georges
Anonymous
January 21, 2005 1:39:49 AM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

I'd be very surprised if it supports over 8GB
"Georges Heinesch" <nomorespam@nomorespam.com> wrote in message
news:35ampaF4klbimU1@individual.net...
> Hi.
>
> I've a rather old Dell Latitude CPI D266Xt, where I'd like to change the
> standard 4 GB harddisk against a newer one (bigger!). I've absolutely no
> experience whatsoever regarding laptop harddisks. I only know it's IDE and
> 2.5"
>
> When looking at the shops (i.e. http://www.alternate.de), what do I have
> to look out for in order not having any surprise after purchase?
>
> Cache, RPM and access time is not relevant to me. I'm worried about the
> physical connector as well as the the U-xxx speed.
>
> Many thanks.
>
> --
> Georges
Anonymous
January 21, 2005 1:39:50 AM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

In article <s4WHd.20306$SK6.16360@bignews3.bellsouth.net>,
tomtoo@softhome.net says...

< Top-posting corrected. Please don't top-post! See this link
for the reason why: http://www.html-faq.com/etiquette/?toppost >

> "Georges Heinesch" <nomorespam@nomorespam.com> wrote in message
> news:35ampaF4klbimU1@individual.net...
> > Hi.
> >
> > I've a rather old Dell Latitude CPI D266Xt, where I'd like to change the
> > standard 4 GB harddisk against a newer one (bigger!). I've absolutely no
> > experience whatsoever regarding laptop harddisks. I only know it's IDE and
> > 2.5"
> >
> > When looking at the shops (i.e. http://www.alternate.de), what do I have
> > to look out for in order not having any surprise after purchase?
> >
> > Cache, RPM and access time is not relevant to me. I'm worried about the
> > physical connector as well as the the U-xxx speed.
> >
> > Many thanks.
> >
> > --
> > Georges

> I'd be very surprised if it supports over 8GB

Prepare to be surprised, then. My old Dell Latitude CP-XT 233
easily supported a 20GB drive.

To answer Georges: Contrary to popular belief, the only thing
proprietary about any given laptop's hard drive seems to be the specific
'carrier' or 'sled' that the drive itself is mounted in.

Said carrier provides a transition connector to go from the
drive's standard 'mini-IDE' connection to whatever the laptop
manufacturer chose for their machine. If you can get the carrier out,
and successfully disassemble it, you should be able to swap the existing
hard drive for a larger one without any problems.

I strongly recommend that you stick with the IBM TravelStar
series. They are exceptionally rugged drives, designed explicitly for
mobile use. You should be able to find any number of such on Greed-Bay,
in any capacity you want.

Happy hunting.


--
Dr. Anton T. Squeegee, Director, Dutch Surrealist Plumbing Institute.
(Known to some as Bruce Lane, ARS KC7GR,
kyrrin (a/t) bluefeathertech[d=o=t]calm -- www.bluefeathertech.com
"If Salvador Dali had owned a computer, would it have been equipped
with surreal ports?"
Related resources
January 21, 2005 2:08:44 AM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

"Tom Scales" <tomtoo@softhome.net> skrev i meddelandet
news:s4WHd.20306$SK6.16360@bignews3.bellsouth.net...
> I'd be very surprised if it supports over 8GB
> "Georges Heinesch" <nomorespam@nomorespam.com> wrote in message
> news:35ampaF4klbimU1@individual.net...
>> Hi.
>>
>> I've a rather old Dell Latitude CPI D266Xt, where I'd like to change the
>> standard 4 GB harddisk against a newer one (bigger!). I've absolutely no
>> experience whatsoever regarding laptop harddisks. I only know it's IDE
>> and 2.5"
>>
>> When looking at the shops (i.e. http://www.alternate.de), what do I have
>> to look out for in order not having any surprise after purchase?
>>
>> Cache, RPM and access time is not relevant to me. I'm worried about the
>> physical connector as well as the the U-xxx speed.
>>
>> Many thanks.
>>
>> --
>> Georges
>
>

Its a standard 2,5" disc and di guess at least discs up to 40GB is
supported commectors om all 2,5" HDD discs will fit

Pelle
Anonymous
January 21, 2005 2:08:45 AM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

"Pelle" <krokodilen_31@msn.com> wrote in message
news:0SWHd.14846$d5.124024@newsb.telia.net...
>
> "Tom Scales" <tomtoo@softhome.net> skrev i meddelandet
> news:s4WHd.20306$SK6.16360@bignews3.bellsouth.net...
>> I'd be very surprised if it supports over 8GB
>> "Georges Heinesch" <nomorespam@nomorespam.com> wrote in message
>> news:35ampaF4klbimU1@individual.net...
>>> Hi.
>>>
>>> I've a rather old Dell Latitude CPI D266Xt, where I'd like to change the
>>> standard 4 GB harddisk against a newer one (bigger!). I've absolutely no
>>> experience whatsoever regarding laptop harddisks. I only know it's IDE
>>> and 2.5"
>>>
>>> When looking at the shops (i.e. http://www.alternate.de), what do I have
>>> to look out for in order not having any surprise after purchase?
>>>
>>> Cache, RPM and access time is not relevant to me. I'm worried about the
>>> physical connector as well as the the U-xxx speed.
>>>
>>> Many thanks.
>>>
>>> --
>>> Georges
>>
>>
>
> Its a standard 2,5" disc and di guess at least discs up to 40GB
> is supported commectors om all 2,5" HDD discs will fit
>
> Pelle
>

What makes you say this old a machine would support 40GB?
Anonymous
January 21, 2005 5:39:41 AM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

IBM sold its disk drive operation to Hitachi a while ago. The TravelStar brand
name and quality live on as the Hitachi TravelStar. I'm setting up a
replacement Hitachi TravelStar drive right now on a Dell Inspiron just out of
warranty... Ben Myers

On Thu, 20 Jan 2005 18:02:51 -0800, Dr. Anton T. Squeegee
<SpammersAreVermin@dev.null> wrote:

>In article <s4WHd.20306$SK6.16360@bignews3.bellsouth.net>,
>tomtoo@softhome.net says...
>
> < Top-posting corrected. Please don't top-post! See this link
>for the reason why: http://www.html-faq.com/etiquette/?toppost >
>
>> "Georges Heinesch" <nomorespam@nomorespam.com> wrote in message
>> news:35ampaF4klbimU1@individual.net...
>> > Hi.
>> >
>> > I've a rather old Dell Latitude CPI D266Xt, where I'd like to change the
>> > standard 4 GB harddisk against a newer one (bigger!). I've absolutely no
>> > experience whatsoever regarding laptop harddisks. I only know it's IDE and
>> > 2.5"
>> >
>> > When looking at the shops (i.e. http://www.alternate.de), what do I have
>> > to look out for in order not having any surprise after purchase?
>> >
>> > Cache, RPM and access time is not relevant to me. I'm worried about the
>> > physical connector as well as the the U-xxx speed.
>> >
>> > Many thanks.
>> >
>> > --
>> > Georges
>
>> I'd be very surprised if it supports over 8GB
>
> Prepare to be surprised, then. My old Dell Latitude CP-XT 233
>easily supported a 20GB drive.
>
> To answer Georges: Contrary to popular belief, the only thing
>proprietary about any given laptop's hard drive seems to be the specific
>'carrier' or 'sled' that the drive itself is mounted in.
>
> Said carrier provides a transition connector to go from the
>drive's standard 'mini-IDE' connection to whatever the laptop
>manufacturer chose for their machine. If you can get the carrier out,
>and successfully disassemble it, you should be able to swap the existing
>hard drive for a larger one without any problems.
>
> I strongly recommend that you stick with the IBM TravelStar
>series. They are exceptionally rugged drives, designed explicitly for
>mobile use. You should be able to find any number of such on Greed-Bay,
>in any capacity you want.
>
> Happy hunting.
>
>
>--
>Dr. Anton T. Squeegee, Director, Dutch Surrealist Plumbing Institute.
>(Known to some as Bruce Lane, ARS KC7GR,
>kyrrin (a/t) bluefeathertech[d=o=t]calm -- www.bluefeathertech.com
>"If Salvador Dali had owned a computer, would it have been equipped
>with surreal ports?"
Anonymous
January 21, 2005 5:39:42 AM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

In article <41f0652d.3348873@nntp.charter.net>, ben_myers_spam_me_not @
charter.net (Ben Myers) says...

< Top-posting corrected. Please don't top-post! See this link for
the reason why: http://www.html-faq.com/etiquette/?toppost >

<snippety>

> >> I'd be very surprised if it supports over 8GB
> >
> > Prepare to be surprised, then. My old Dell Latitude CP-XT 233
> >easily supported a 20GB drive.
> >
> > To answer Georges: Contrary to popular belief, the only thing
> >proprietary about any given laptop's hard drive seems to be the specific
> >'carrier' or 'sled' that the drive itself is mounted in.
> >
> > Said carrier provides a transition connector to go from the
> >drive's standard 'mini-IDE' connection to whatever the laptop
> >manufacturer chose for their machine. If you can get the carrier out,
> >and successfully disassemble it, you should be able to swap the existing
> >hard drive for a larger one without any problems.
> >
> > I strongly recommend that you stick with the IBM TravelStar

> IBM sold its disk drive operation to Hitachi a while ago. The TravelStar brand
> name and quality live on as the Hitachi TravelStar. I'm setting up a
> replacement Hitachi TravelStar drive right now on a Dell Inspiron just out of
> warranty... Ben Myers

Thanks, Ben, that's good to know -- But please don't top-post! ;-)


--
Dr. Anton T. Squeegee, Director, Dutch Surrealist Plumbing Institute.
(Known to some as Bruce Lane, ARS KC7GR,
kyrrin (a/t) bluefeathertech[d=o=t]calm -- www.bluefeathertech.com
"If Salvador Dali had owned a computer, would it have been equipped
with surreal ports?"


----== Posted via Newsfeeds.Com - Unlimited-Uncensored-Secure Usenet News==----
http://www.newsfeeds.com The #1 Newsgroup Service in the World! >100,000 Newsgroups
---= East/West-Coast Server Farms - Total Privacy via Encryption =---
Anonymous
January 21, 2005 6:13:44 PM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

There is no internet standard for top- or bottom-posting. It's bifurcated, and
depends on ones own tastes, preferences and experience. I happen to use a
newsreader that facilitates top-posting, and I have grown accustomed to reading
the most recent part of a message thread, responding accordingly. I'm a LIFO
kind of guy, not a FIFO one, but I can live with either type of posting.

.... Ben Myers

On Thu, 20 Jan 2005 21:48:22 -0800, Dr. Anton T. Squeegee
<SpammersAreVermin@dev.null> wrote:

>In article <41f0652d.3348873@nntp.charter.net>, ben_myers_spam_me_not @
>charter.net (Ben Myers) says...
>
> < Top-posting corrected. Please don't top-post! See this link for
>the reason why: http://www.html-faq.com/etiquette/?toppost >
>
> <snippety>
>
>> >> I'd be very surprised if it supports over 8GB
>> >
>> > Prepare to be surprised, then. My old Dell Latitude CP-XT 233
>> >easily supported a 20GB drive.
>> >
>> > To answer Georges: Contrary to popular belief, the only thing
>> >proprietary about any given laptop's hard drive seems to be the specific
>> >'carrier' or 'sled' that the drive itself is mounted in.
>> >
>> > Said carrier provides a transition connector to go from the
>> >drive's standard 'mini-IDE' connection to whatever the laptop
>> >manufacturer chose for their machine. If you can get the carrier out,
>> >and successfully disassemble it, you should be able to swap the existing
>> >hard drive for a larger one without any problems.
>> >
>> > I strongly recommend that you stick with the IBM TravelStar
>
>> IBM sold its disk drive operation to Hitachi a while ago. The TravelStar brand
>> name and quality live on as the Hitachi TravelStar. I'm setting up a
>> replacement Hitachi TravelStar drive right now on a Dell Inspiron just out of
>> warranty... Ben Myers
>
> Thanks, Ben, that's good to know -- But please don't top-post! ;-)
>
>
>--
>Dr. Anton T. Squeegee, Director, Dutch Surrealist Plumbing Institute.
>(Known to some as Bruce Lane, ARS KC7GR,
>kyrrin (a/t) bluefeathertech[d=o=t]calm -- www.bluefeathertech.com
>"If Salvador Dali had owned a computer, would it have been equipped
>with surreal ports?"
>
>
>----== Posted via Newsfeeds.Com - Unlimited-Uncensored-Secure Usenet News==----
>http://www.newsfeeds.com The #1 Newsgroup Service in the World! >100,000 Newsgroups
>---= East/West-Coast Server Farms - Total Privacy via Encryption =---
Anonymous
January 21, 2005 6:13:45 PM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

ben_myers_spam_me_not @ charter.net (Ben Myers) wrote:

>There is no internet standard for top- or bottom-posting. It's bifurcated, and
>depends on ones own tastes, preferences and experience. I happen to use a
>newsreader that facilitates top-posting, and I have grown accustomed to reading
>the most recent part of a message thread, responding accordingly. I'm a LIFO
>kind of guy, not a FIFO one, but I can live with either type of posting.

Whereas I look at top posting as being inconsiderate of the
reader. As Usenet grew in the early years, people found that
their posts had more impact if they used the interspersed
comments method. Trimming the quoted material to just enough to
put their comment in context, then commenting, then trimming more
quoted material, then commenting more, etc.

Today, I see a top post with the total quote of everything that
went before, as if the poster is telling me "If you need to find
out what I'm replying to, find it yourself, I don't have the time
or inclination to put my post in context with what has gone
before."

OTOH, I'd rather have a top post, than a post by someone who
quotes the entire previous post, consisting of 200-300 lines of
quotes from all of the posts in the thread, just to add a one
line "You're full of s[tuff]."

There's a happy medium to be found, but I don't think it will be.

For now, if a top-poster is a valued contributor, IMO naturally,
to the NG involved, I live with it. If they aren't, I KF them.
If they say anything really valuable, I'll see it in someone
else's post; typically one that has used the interspersed comment
method.

ObBlastFromThePast: Death of Usenet. News at 11.
--
OJ III
[Email to Yahoo address may be burned before reading.
Lower and crunch the sig and you'll net me at comcast.]
Anonymous
January 21, 2005 6:13:46 PM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

Well whoopde doo.

Good thing the Internet is a medium with free choice.

Personally, I think you're wrong. Perhaps in the days of 300 baud modems,
but even then, scrolling to the bottom to read a reply just seems silly
"Ogden Johnson III" <oj3usmc@yahoo.com> wrote in message
news:7t92v0p098hvkqflf7hgf4ki8ue49ibko3@4ax.com...
> ben_myers_spam_me_not @ charter.net (Ben Myers) wrote:
>
>>There is no internet standard for top- or bottom-posting. It's
>>bifurcated, and
>>depends on ones own tastes, preferences and experience. I happen to use a
>>newsreader that facilitates top-posting, and I have grown accustomed to
>>reading
>>the most recent part of a message thread, responding accordingly. I'm a
>>LIFO
>>kind of guy, not a FIFO one, but I can live with either type of posting.
>
> Whereas I look at top posting as being inconsiderate of the
> reader. As Usenet grew in the early years, people found that
> their posts had more impact if they used the interspersed
> comments method. Trimming the quoted material to just enough to
> put their comment in context, then commenting, then trimming more
> quoted material, then commenting more, etc.
>
> Today, I see a top post with the total quote of everything that
> went before, as if the poster is telling me "If you need to find
> out what I'm replying to, find it yourself, I don't have the time
> or inclination to put my post in context with what has gone
> before."
>
> OTOH, I'd rather have a top post, than a post by someone who
> quotes the entire previous post, consisting of 200-300 lines of
> quotes from all of the posts in the thread, just to add a one
> line "You're full of s[tuff]."
>
> There's a happy medium to be found, but I don't think it will be.
>
> For now, if a top-poster is a valued contributor, IMO naturally,
> to the NG involved, I live with it. If they aren't, I KF them.
> If they say anything really valuable, I'll see it in someone
> else's post; typically one that has used the interspersed comment
> method.
>
> ObBlastFromThePast: Death of Usenet. News at 11.
> --
> OJ III
> [Email to Yahoo address may be burned before reading.
> Lower and crunch the sig and you'll net me at comcast.]
Anonymous
January 21, 2005 7:11:13 PM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

As far as I understand it all 2.5" IDE disks have the same connector. If
your CPI is similar to my CPxJ the disk fits into a carrier, which holds the
drive and converts the standard IDE to the type of connector used in the
machine itself.

The machine's connector seems sturdier than the IDE one, and I suspect it is
designed to allow removal/replacement of the drive without damaging the
connector. Dell don't seem to promote this idea though, so I may be wrong.
If you had two carriers I suppose you could have a disk with Windows on it,
and another with loaded with Linux, for example.

Anyway, swapping the disk is very easy, in the CPX series anyway, and takes
around 2 minutes.

John

"Georges Heinesch" <nomorespam@nomorespam.com> wrote in message
news:35ampaF4klbimU1@individual.net...
> Hi.
>
> I've a rather old Dell Latitude CPI D266Xt, where I'd like to change the
> standard 4 GB harddisk against a newer one (bigger!). I've absolutely no
> experience whatsoever regarding laptop harddisks. I only know it's IDE
> and 2.5"
>
> When looking at the shops (i.e. http://www.alternate.de), what do I have
> to look out for in order not having any surprise after purchase?
>
> Cache, RPM and access time is not relevant to me. I'm worried about the
> physical connector as well as the the U-xxx speed.
>
> Many thanks.
>
> --
> Georges
Anonymous
January 22, 2005 2:30:08 AM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

Amen!!!

"Tom Scales" <tomtoo@softhome.net> wrote in message
news:u8cId.32190$vh.8149@bignews4.bellsouth.net...
> Well whoopde doo.
>
> Good thing the Internet is a medium with free choice.
>
> Personally, I think you're wrong. Perhaps in the days of 300 baud modems,
> but even then, scrolling to the bottom to read a reply just seems silly
> "Ogden Johnson III" <oj3usmc@yahoo.com> wrote in message
> news:7t92v0p098hvkqflf7hgf4ki8ue49ibko3@4ax.com...
>> ben_myers_spam_me_not @ charter.net (Ben Myers) wrote:
>>
>>>There is no internet standard for top- or bottom-posting. It's
>>>bifurcated, and
>>>depends on ones own tastes, preferences and experience. I happen to use
>>>a
>>>newsreader that facilitates top-posting, and I have grown accustomed to
>>>reading
>>>the most recent part of a message thread, responding accordingly. I'm a
>>>LIFO
>>>kind of guy, not a FIFO one, but I can live with either type of posting.
>>
>> Whereas I look at top posting as being inconsiderate of the
>> reader. As Usenet grew in the early years, people found that
>> their posts had more impact if they used the interspersed
>> comments method. Trimming the quoted material to just enough to
>> put their comment in context, then commenting, then trimming more
>> quoted material, then commenting more, etc.
>>
>> Today, I see a top post with the total quote of everything that
>> went before, as if the poster is telling me "If you need to find
>> out what I'm replying to, find it yourself, I don't have the time
>> or inclination to put my post in context with what has gone
>> before."
>>
>> OTOH, I'd rather have a top post, than a post by someone who
>> quotes the entire previous post, consisting of 200-300 lines of
>> quotes from all of the posts in the thread, just to add a one
>> line "You're full of s[tuff]."
>>
>> There's a happy medium to be found, but I don't think it will be.
>>
>> For now, if a top-poster is a valued contributor, IMO naturally,
>> to the NG involved, I live with it. If they aren't, I KF them.
>> If they say anything really valuable, I'll see it in someone
>> else's post; typically one that has used the interspersed comment
>> method.
>>
>> ObBlastFromThePast: Death of Usenet. News at 11.
>> --
>> OJ III
>> [Email to Yahoo address may be burned before reading.
>> Lower and crunch the sig and you'll net me at comcast.]
>
>
Anonymous
January 22, 2005 11:12:26 AM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

Dr. Anton T. Squeegee wrote:

>>I'd be very surprised if it supports over 8GB
>
> Prepare to be surprised, then. My old Dell Latitude CP-XT 233
> easily supported a 20GB drive.

I only heard about the 128 GB limit. The BIOS and the operating system
have to be able to deal with this. Win2000 SP3 does. Since I plan to put
an 80 GB drive in, it would be good to know whether this one will work
properly or not.

Thanks for your answers.

--
Georges
Anonymous
January 22, 2005 5:36:05 PM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

The BIOS limitations on hard disk capacity have changed over time.

The original IBM AT had only a table of drive capacities in its BIOS. If your
drive did not match one of the table entries, you were in trouble.

286 AT clone and 386 systems improved on the drive table problem by introducing
user defined capacities. You had to enter the numbers of tracks, cylinders, and
heads manually into the setup.

With late 386 and 486 systems came autotyping, automatic recognition of drive
capacities up to 524MB.

Subsequent BIOS barriers were/are 2.1GB (late 486 & early Pentium), 8.4GB (late
Pentium and early Pentium II), 32GB (late Pentium II & early Pentium III), and
128GB. Some oddball motherboards, notably DEC-branded and Micronics with a
cobbled up version of Phoenix BIOS had unusual limits of 4.2GB or 8GB.

Now you've heard about almost all of the BIOS limitations except for IBM's
MicroChannel computers, which came from another planet, anyway.

.... Ben Myers

On Sat, 22 Jan 2005 08:12:26 +0100, Georges Heinesch <nomorespam@nomorespam.com>
wrote:

>Dr. Anton T. Squeegee wrote:
>
>>>I'd be very surprised if it supports over 8GB
>>
>> Prepare to be surprised, then. My old Dell Latitude CP-XT 233
>> easily supported a 20GB drive.
>
>I only heard about the 128 GB limit. The BIOS and the operating system
>have to be able to deal with this. Win2000 SP3 does. Since I plan to put
>an 80 GB drive in, it would be good to know whether this one will work
>properly or not.
>
>Thanks for your answers.
>
>--
>Georges
Anonymous
January 22, 2005 10:28:04 PM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

Ben Myers wrote:

> Subsequent BIOS barriers were/are 2.1GB (late 486 & early Pentium), 8.4GB (late
> Pentium and early Pentium II), 32GB (late Pentium II & early Pentium III), and
> 128GB. Some oddball motherboards, notably DEC-branded and Micronics with a
> cobbled up version of Phoenix BIOS had unusual limits of 4.2GB or 8GB.

The Dell Latitude Cpi D266XT is a PII 266 Mhz. Hence, I guess that the
32 GB limit could already create a problem. But how can I find out. I
purchased already a 200 GB drive for another Dell compueter (Dimension
PIII, 450 MHz) where the BIOS only supported 128 GB drives.

Hence this time, I would like to be sure that I don't waste GBs, but how
can I find out?

Thanks.

--
Georges
Anonymous
January 22, 2005 11:03:02 PM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

Strictly a guess, but you are safe up to 8.4GB, with some odds that a 20GB or
30GB will be OK. My guesswork has to do with the larger capacities, not the
smaller ones.

To find out for sure, you'll need a response from someone who has actually
succeeded with a larger drive.

I have a client's dead Latitude Cpi D300XT here with a 4GB drive in it. The 4GB
capacity was shipped with the unit from the factory. I have no intention of
fixing it, only parting it out... Ben Myers

On Sat, 22 Jan 2005 19:28:04 +0100, Georges Heinesch <nomorespam@nomorespam.com>
wrote:

>Ben Myers wrote:
>
>> Subsequent BIOS barriers were/are 2.1GB (late 486 & early Pentium), 8.4GB (late
>> Pentium and early Pentium II), 32GB (late Pentium II & early Pentium III), and
>> 128GB. Some oddball motherboards, notably DEC-branded and Micronics with a
>> cobbled up version of Phoenix BIOS had unusual limits of 4.2GB or 8GB.
>
>The Dell Latitude Cpi D266XT is a PII 266 Mhz. Hence, I guess that the
>32 GB limit could already create a problem. But how can I find out. I
>purchased already a 200 GB drive for another Dell compueter (Dimension
>PIII, 450 MHz) where the BIOS only supported 128 GB drives.
>
>Hence this time, I would like to be sure that I don't waste GBs, but how
>can I find out?
>
>Thanks.
>
>--
>Georges
Anonymous
January 23, 2005 12:34:43 AM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

> Ben Myers wrote:
> > Subsequent BIOS barriers were/are 2.1GB (late 486 & early Pentium),
> > 8.4GB (late Pentium and early Pentium II), 32GB (late Pentium II &
> > early Pentium III), and 128GB.

"Georges Heinesch" wrote:
> The Dell Latitude Cpi D266XT is a PII 266 Mhz. Hence, I guess that
> the 32 GB limit could already create a problem. But how can I find out.

Georges, it should be pointed out that Ben's rough guidelines are meant to
relate bios limits common when those classes of machines first came out, but
that doesn't mean a subsequent bios update couldn't have been produced to
exceed the previous limits. If the original CPiD bios didn't support 8.4GB
or 32GB, a later flash bios update might have. As Ben said, the only way to
know for sure is to ask someone who has the same machine and/or bios.

If I had to guess, I'd say your chances for 80GB are good, but you may need
to make sure you're using the latest bios update. I would think the bios's
of CPi models are relatively similar to each other, and my CPiA366 has no
trouble with a 40GB drive and a 2001 bios version (A15).

You may want to visit Dell's forum (http://forums.us.dell.com/) and ask.
There are a couple guys there that work with a lot of older Dells and seem
to have a very good idea of what can/cannot be done with various machines.
Anonymous
January 23, 2005 5:59:23 AM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

Whether or not a motherboard manufacturer or name-brand computer "manufacturer"
updates a BIOS to expand BIOS drive limits is best viewed on a case-by-case or
manufacturer-by-manufacturer basis. In my experience, the BIOS updates which
raised disk drive limits have actually been pretty rare.

The manufacturers of motherboards with poorly written English language
documentation (read that as China, Taiwan, and S. Korea) typically heave
motherboards over the transom onto an unsuspecting public and never want to be
heard from again. BIOS updates for these boards are rare indeed.

The leading manufacturers of motherboards (keeps changing, but Intel designs and
Asus boards have long been among the leaders) need to compete aggressively with
one another, both for the generic white-box business and OEM business with name
brand companies like Dell. Intel still designs nearly all of the
almost-standard form factor boards used by Dell, and Intel issues BIOS updates
when the market demands or when there are egregious technical errors to fix.
Dell takes the Intel BIOS cores for desktops and puts its own look-and-feel
around them. It does the same with the notebook BIOS core provided by its
notebook manufacturer.

Certainly the OP ought to search out a BIOS update for his Latitude CPi system.
My sense of the Latitude CPi motherboards is that they are all the same design
and they use the same BIOS as long as the processor bus speed is the same. From
the standpoint of intelligent cost-effective hardware design, this would be
logical. So the OP's 266MHz, your 366MHz and my client's now-dead 300MHz system
probably share the same design and BIOS. The best way to verify this, of
course, is to search the Dell web site for a BIOS upgrade and see if the 266 and
366 CPi systems have the same BIOS download.

The OP should take comfort in the fact that a 40GB drive works just fine in your
system. Would I go larger than 40GB on a 266MHz system? Probably not. And I
would certainly compare the power consumption between the current drive and any
candidate replacement drive... Ben Myers

On Sat, 22 Jan 2005 21:34:43 GMT, "dg1261" <dg1261nojunk@cs.com> wrote:

>
>> Ben Myers wrote:
>> > Subsequent BIOS barriers were/are 2.1GB (late 486 & early Pentium),
>> > 8.4GB (late Pentium and early Pentium II), 32GB (late Pentium II &
>> > early Pentium III), and 128GB.
>
>"Georges Heinesch" wrote:
>> The Dell Latitude Cpi D266XT is a PII 266 Mhz. Hence, I guess that
>> the 32 GB limit could already create a problem. But how can I find out.
>
>Georges, it should be pointed out that Ben's rough guidelines are meant to
>relate bios limits common when those classes of machines first came out, but
>that doesn't mean a subsequent bios update couldn't have been produced to
>exceed the previous limits. If the original CPiD bios didn't support 8.4GB
>or 32GB, a later flash bios update might have. As Ben said, the only way to
>know for sure is to ask someone who has the same machine and/or bios.
>
>If I had to guess, I'd say your chances for 80GB are good, but you may need
>to make sure you're using the latest bios update. I would think the bios's
>of CPi models are relatively similar to each other, and my CPiA366 has no
>trouble with a 40GB drive and a 2001 bios version (A15).
>
>You may want to visit Dell's forum (http://forums.us.dell.com/) and ask.
>There are a couple guys there that work with a lot of older Dells and seem
>to have a very good idea of what can/cannot be done with various machines.
>
>
Anonymous
January 24, 2005 9:56:32 AM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

well, that's you all over, isn't it.
lurking around the dell group posting inaccuracies on the basis of
owning a few dells, rather than knowing what you're talking about when
it comes to PC hardware.

for the record, the definitive answer here is that all CP models will
take at least 20GB laptop drives. all 2.5" laptop drives have the same
pinouts, which are adapted to the laptop by the drive carrier. they
come in two thicknesses: 9.5 and 11mm - and the CP dells (like most
laptops bar the ultralights) will take either.
the end.

ric
Anonymous
January 24, 2005 1:42:29 PM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

"ric" <publicmail@infobubble.co.uk> wrote:

>well, that's you all over, isn't it.
>lurking around the dell group posting inaccuracies on the basis of
>owning a few dells, rather than knowing what you're talking about when
>it comes to PC hardware.

So you have decided to lurk around the dell group and stalk this
poster who seems to have pissed you off supremely, and post this
canned screed every time you see one of his/her posts.

Since you didn't include any attribution/quote of the post you
found so offensive, I don't know who it is that set you off. I
do know, though, which one of you is going to end up in the twit
filter.
--
OJ III
[Email to Yahoo address may be burned before reading.
Lower and crunch the sig and you'll net me at comcast.]
Anonymous
January 24, 2005 5:57:13 PM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

Based on his posts, I suspect it's me. Not sure why, as I am always careful
to say when I "KNOW" and when I "THINK".

Yeah, I love to be here, helping, unpaid, just to give bad advice.


"Ogden Johnson III" <oj3usmc@yahoo.com> wrote in message
news:ll5av0dg3j4uuj4luh1j7ptkomaecodina@4ax.com...
> "ric" <publicmail@infobubble.co.uk> wrote:
>
>>well, that's you all over, isn't it.
>>lurking around the dell group posting inaccuracies on the basis of
>>owning a few dells, rather than knowing what you're talking about when
>>it comes to PC hardware.
>
> So you have decided to lurk around the dell group and stalk this
> poster who seems to have pissed you off supremely, and post this
> canned screed every time you see one of his/her posts.
>
> Since you didn't include any attribution/quote of the post you
> found so offensive, I don't know who it is that set you off. I
> do know, though, which one of you is going to end up in the twit
> filter.
> --
> OJ III
> [Email to Yahoo address may be burned before reading.
> Lower and crunch the sig and you'll net me at comcast.]
January 27, 2005 1:50:40 PM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

>>>>> Tom Scales writes:

Tom> Based on his posts, I suspect it's me. Not sure why, as I am always careful
Tom> to say when I "KNOW" and when I "THINK".

His header did indeed reference one of your posts.

Tom> Yeah, I love to be here, helping, unpaid, just to give bad advice.


Tom> "Ogden Johnson III" <oj3usmc@yahoo.com> wrote in message
news> ll5av0dg3j4uuj4luh1j7ptkomaecodina@4ax.com...
>> "ric" <publicmail@infobubble.co.uk> wrote:
>>
>>> well, that's you all over, isn't it.
>>> lurking around the dell group posting inaccuracies on the basis of
>>> owning a few dells, rather than knowing what you're talking about when
>>> it comes to PC hardware.
>>
>> So you have decided to lurk around the dell group and stalk this
>> poster who seems to have pissed you off supremely, and post this
>> canned screed every time you see one of his/her posts.
>>
>> Since you didn't include any attribution/quote of the post you
>> found so offensive, I don't know who it is that set you off. I
>> do know, though, which one of you is going to end up in the twit
>> filter.
>> --
>> OJ III
>> [Email to Yahoo address may be burned before reading.
>> Lower and crunch the sig and you'll net me at comcast.]




--
Andrew Hall
(Now reading Usenet in alt.sys.pc-clone.dell...)
Anonymous
January 29, 2005 2:22:36 AM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

dg1261 wrote:

> ...
> If I had to guess, I'd say your chances for 80GB are good, but you may need
> to make sure you're using the latest bios update. I would think the bios's
> of CPi models are relatively similar to each other, and my CPiA366 has no
> trouble with a 40GB drive and a 2001 bios version (A15).

I have the latest version (A12).

> You may want to visit Dell's forum (http://forums.us.dell.com/) and ask.
> There are a couple guys there that work with a lot of older Dells and seem
> to have a very good idea of what can/cannot be done with various machines.

That's what I did already. No clear answer so far ;(

Thanks for your help.

--
Georges
!