Sign in with
Sign up | Sign in
Your question

Home Videos to DVD??

Last response: in Computer Brands
Share
Anonymous
January 20, 2005 11:21:58 PM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

I would like to put all our home videos (approx 35 hrs worth) onto DVD so
viewing will be easier then hooking our cam to the TV plus it would act as a
back up to our original tapes. All videos were shot with a Sony Hi 8mm
camcorder, it is not digital so rca analog connections will be a must. Would
it be smarter to get a good DVD RW for our Dell and upgrade the video card
to accept these connections or would it be better to buy a standalone DVD
RW. Also please inform on this double layer stuff I've been seeing in my
new search. I am not up on the newest or even present day DVD recorders, my
Dell XPS T1000 is 3 years old and only has a DVD drive and CDRW drive. Any
help and info would be GREATLY appreciated...

More about : home videos dvd

Anonymous
January 20, 2005 11:28:16 PM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

In article <E8ydnbm_WMCqxG3cRVn-jg@adelphia.com>, Pinger@yahoo.com
says...
> I would like to put all our home videos (approx 35 hrs worth) onto DVD so
> viewing will be easier then hooking our cam to the TV plus it would act as a
> back up to our original tapes. All videos were shot with a Sony Hi 8mm
> camcorder, it is not digital so rca analog connections will be a must. Would
> it be smarter to get a good DVD RW for our Dell and upgrade the video card
> to accept these connections or would it be better to buy a standalone DVD
> RW. Also please inform on this double layer stuff I've been seeing in my
> new search. I am not up on the newest or even present day DVD recorders, my
> Dell XPS T1000 is 3 years old and only has a DVD drive and CDRW drive. Any
> help and info would be GREATLY appreciated...

There are advantages and disadvantages to both...

If you put the DVD+-RW drive in your computer you can edit the videos
before burning them. Add titles, effects, move scenes, etc. However,
there is a learning curve involved. There is also the added advantage
of burning DVD data discs for backup and such.

If you get a stand-alone DVD recorder, you can more easily just move
your video onto DVD. Many of the better ones even have minimal editing
ability. It is definitely a MUCH MUCH simpler process than doing it on
your computer. But you lose the advanced editing/titling features.

Dual Layer is still in its infancy and I wouldn't be thinking/worrying
about it right now. I own 4 different DVD players from high-end Sony
and RCA to low/medium end Apex and Sansui. All purchased within the
past two years. NONE of them will accept Dual Layer media. I can burn
movies to Dual Layer on my computer but I can only watch them on my
computer.

I guess it really comes down to how much time do you have to spend on
moving your videos over to DVD media? I'm a computer geek and I bought
my first DVD-R drive specifically for moving all of my home movies over
to DVD. I spent hours editing each video, tweaking it, adding
transition effects, titles, etc. And at the pace I was working, it was
going to take me years to get them all moved over. And eventually the
"wow" factor of seeing all of those effects and such wore off.

So, I bought a stand-alone DVD recorders and just started copying all of
the VHS tapes and Mini-DV tapes over to DVD media without all of the
effects. My family is just as happy with straight copies as they were
with all the fancy stuff. I reserve all of that for when I have special
videos (birthdays, anniversaries, etc.).

So, my personal suggestion would be to just get the best stand alone DVD
recorder that you can afford. One with a hard drive and FireWire
support would be preferable. You can always pick up a DVD burner for
your computer later if you want to get fancy with your editing.
!