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Cool Your PC or Lpatop with Ionic Wind

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May 21, 2009 11:59:30 PM

B-
Check your spelling.
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May 22, 2009 12:05:26 AM

lpatop lol
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May 22, 2009 12:22:46 AM

Neat idea but what about possible electrical noise,etc?
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May 22, 2009 1:20:26 AM

Great, now when i go to work on peoples laptops i will be met with a 6000v 'welcome sign' that shocks the piss out of me.
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May 22, 2009 1:29:53 AM

How about quiet desktop solutions?

liquid cooling is great and all, but if you're building a cheap HTPC, it may be out of budget.
This is saying cheap, quiet, efficient. I like the idea of it. Makes sense if you want something quiet that performs well.
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May 22, 2009 1:34:15 AM

It would be cheaper and better just to make the heat sink bigger simply by spreading it out throughout the chasis via heat pipes.
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May 22, 2009 1:36:29 AM

anamaniacHow about quiet desktop solutions?liquid cooling is great and all, but if you're building a cheap HTPC, it may be out of budget.This is saying cheap, quiet, efficient. I like the idea of it. Makes sense if you want something quiet that performs well.


Performs well, Unless you get dust.. Im in Iraq right now... This would never work here and I know common folk refuse to dust their PC's... it will spell disaster!!
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May 22, 2009 2:03:15 AM

PC_GIGreat, now when i go to work on peoples laptops i will be met with a 6000v 'welcome sign' that shocks the piss out of me.


How about 1 amp? /gg
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May 22, 2009 2:26:46 AM

simplyderpHow about 1 amp? /gg




You have never heard, "Volts Hurt, Amps Kill"???
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May 22, 2009 2:56:41 AM

What about it producing ozone? Even Sharper Image admits that their ionic breeze air purifier produces ozone.

I wouldn't want to have to google myself out of a locked closet with one of these in my laptops...
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May 22, 2009 5:34:09 AM

Insta buy. cold=good.
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May 22, 2009 7:28:07 AM

When they fix the problems its got, I'll buy it
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Anonymous
a b D Laptop
May 22, 2009 12:05:48 PM

They seem to forget that this is exactly how electrostatic air cleaners work. So in one month, your PC will be clogged up.
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Anonymous
a b D Laptop
May 22, 2009 12:09:21 PM

Very very old news. First time I heard of the ionized air fan idea was in an Elektor electronics magazine back in 1982 or 1983 where they presented it as a diy description, maybe someone can dig up which back issue it was in. The inherent problem is of course that ionizing air generates ozon which is toxic.
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May 22, 2009 1:26:26 PM

simplyderpHow about 1 amp? /gg

6000 V * 1 amp = 6000 joule is quite enough to char you. I wonder if there's that much energy in the laptop battery, though.
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Anonymous
a b D Laptop
May 22, 2009 1:54:03 PM

Have you ever introduced latex to ozone (latex glove, etc)? the ozone will eat it right up. I didn't know about ozone till I watched a special about it.
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May 22, 2009 2:24:31 PM

the smallest statice electric spark is around 500 volts,,,3000 is really nothing if there is minimal amount of power flowing through it,,,the only way to get a good shock off the system is if you touch both ends at the same time,, then you're just being an idiot
as for making heatsink bigger,,this is for a laptop, ppl are trying to make them smaller, not heavier
I agree the ozone part may be an issue,,but who knows how much is actually generated, it may take days in a completely sealed room to have enough to cause a problem.
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May 22, 2009 3:00:04 PM

"...costs less than the conventional fan..."

Hm... costs less to produce, it will not be cheap for us.
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May 22, 2009 3:57:12 PM

Sounds interesting and practical too. I would definitely want to have one if it was available.
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Anonymous
a b D Laptop
May 22, 2009 5:30:33 PM

uses less power than a fan, even after the conversion of 3000V in a laptop? I'd like to see this!
Surely there are safety issues with 3000V being on a device like a laptop; risk of getting electrocuted, risk of distorting radiofrequencies like wireless lan, cellphone signals, the internal sound card, interferring with hearing devices (or perhaps pacemakers)...

It's pretty hard to imagine, looking at my laptop, that this device will be able to extend more heat than a fan, seeing that my laptop's fan is pretty powerful and needs a lot of air to cool it.
So perhaps the system used needs a larger surface? It's hard to imagine it could extract more heat from a laptop than a fan would, while not being able to provide the same airflow.

What would happen if an obstacle would be next to the laptop (eg: an empty plastic bottle placed next to the fan's exhaust)? With less airflow, and still more heat being extracted, the bottle could locally heat up a lot, and perhaps even melt.

Hard to believe... Especially if they say that it 'costs less than a fan'. Since a laptop fan costs less than $1, it is hard to believe those claims are true!
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May 22, 2009 5:31:12 PM

MonkeySweatbut who knows how much is actually generated, it may take days in a completely sealed room to have enough to cause a problem.

ponder 30-50 ionic coooled laptops on a 4hour plane ride...

I'll pass on that one, thanks
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May 22, 2009 6:53:45 PM

It sounds like it has a lot of issues still to solve. If its takes more power than a fan it could be a no go anyways.
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May 22, 2009 7:08:38 PM

Wow, what a great idea, except for the fact that electrical discharges like that create Ozone. Now you can only use that laptop with the new ionic wind cooling system in a well-ventilated area. And the idea of adding a prefilter that they proposed? Wow, apparently these people have never worked on a laptop before. Filters on laptops are in general a really bad idea. The average user never cleans out their laptop fans with with compressed air, and adding a filter would just exagerate the problem becuase it would trap more dirt and I cant even count the number of laptops that have come into my shop because theyre randomly turning off or rebooting, just to discover the heatsink completely entombed in a crust of dust and fuzz. Youre best bet is just to pass small dust straight thru the heatsink and blow it back out like most of them already do. But of course with an electrostatic charge being used to move the air, I can only imagine how that would turn out. Stick to the $1 brushless DC fan in my opinion.
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May 22, 2009 7:50:24 PM

don't comment on power converters unless you know how they work... voltage doubling effects from a DC standpoint work by manipulating charge on a capacitor. there is no way for this voltage to supply any amount of steady state current whatsoever, so in the event that the charge is rapidly removed, the event would be similar to an ESD event. so the power supply which generates 6 kV only needs to keep up with the leakage current(generally small, microamps worst case)

oh and P = I*V is in watts, which is in joules / sec, so 1,000,000 V of potential discharging with 1 microamp (average) over 1 sec is 1 W of power during that 1 sec, and 1 J of energy is discharged.

as others have said, the problem with ionizing air is the ozone it produces
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Anonymous
a b D Laptop
May 23, 2009 2:50:18 PM

this is a quite old system to create airflow. I suggest people to search google for small UFO/helicopter like flying devices using this technique. The main probem is the efficiency...
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May 23, 2009 5:52:20 PM

As partially already pointed out, problems are: high voltage generation (efficiency, reliability problems in commercially available CCFL inverters), electrocution danger (only organoleptically unpleasant, if proper done - high source impedance), ozone generation, potential EMC problems (LV digital electronics and HV don't cohabit nicely, electrically charged particles in LV HZ electronic circuits can wreak havoc), particle contamination is a show stopper (conductive particles - insect zapper anyone? - and humidity, can quickly short the electrodes).

All in all, it might (somehow) work in a lab, but the real world is much tougher.

eddieroolzSounds interesting and practical too. I would definitely want to have one if it was available.

And if it also has a m$ sticker, it's a done deal... best ever.
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May 25, 2009 5:37:56 AM

Have you ever heard an Ionic Breeze when they go bad i.e. collect too much dust? The sound is unbearable... It would make a computer unusable.
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May 25, 2009 6:18:57 AM

There's a reason the "Ionic Breeze" flopped and was discontinued. Not just because it didn't work, but because it was hazardous to your health as well. OZONE = BAD. How bad? Lung cancer bad. Could never be used in closed spaces with recycled/recirculated air supplies.

Why do they still think this is a good idea?
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May 27, 2009 11:49:14 AM

how can something this elaborate be cheaper than a plastic fan with a simple motor? and the reiability issue with fans - well if the tiny power supply fails on this thing, then what? and what about enviroments where air isn't clean ? I just returned from a trip to our wielders, and there's a ton of metallic dust inside the computers there. Wouldn't this solution break in such a location?
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