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Intel: Core i5 'Lynnfield' Still on Track for 2H'09

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May 26, 2009 10:31:00 PM

"The P55 chipset will be priced at US$40.”

Is this a typo?
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May 26, 2009 10:42:18 PM

Hehe, yeah, the chipset will cost $40, and for every additional PCI, SATA, and Lan slot...
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May 26, 2009 10:52:11 PM

I wonder how much will core i5 differentiate from i7 on the benchmarks... would it worth waiting ?
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May 26, 2009 11:16:24 PM

the chipset cost is just that, the chipset. Not actual retail boards.
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May 26, 2009 11:21:04 PM

I am also curious as to whether or not these will have any improvements over the i7.

The i7 has proven to be the most clock efficient, and overclocks like a champ.
The cheapest i7 is $280 right now, and I personally want it. Will we have any reason other than price alone to get an i5?
I'm personally hoping it can exploit the benefits of ddr3 better and have even better clock efficiency.
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May 26, 2009 11:42:01 PM

How many processor cores will the i5 have? Is it still a quad core but smaller? Tri-core? Dual? what?
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May 26, 2009 11:42:50 PM

Can someone tell me what the Core i5 is? I thought i7 was the "more mainstream" product (Xeon being the top-end). What makes i5 different from i7? How is $500+ "more mainstream"?
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May 26, 2009 11:43:50 PM

freiheitnerCan someone tell me what the Core i5 is? I thought i7 was the "more mainstream" product (Xeon being the top-end). What makes i5 different from i7? How is $500+ "more mainstream"?


Sorry, meant $200+.
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May 26, 2009 11:48:33 PM

Bloomfield (i7) is high end desktop, Lynnfield is mainstream desktop, and Xeon components are meant as server/workstation CPUs.
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May 26, 2009 11:55:26 PM


PigbearmanHow many processor cores will the i5 have? Is it still a quad core but smaller? Tri-core? Dual? what?

I'm pretty sure i5 is going to be Quad, I could be wrong though.
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Anonymous
May 27, 2009 1:09:23 AM

i5 is a toned down i7. Dual channel memory instead of triple channel.

Not sure what other things they took out offhand.

Those prices are too expensive tho.
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May 27, 2009 1:26:53 AM

I would loosely liken the Core i5's/Core i7's to the Pentium Dual Cores/Core 2 Duo's....but in quad-core format.

Obviously completely different chipsets and memory are involved but I'm talking about mindset.

Is that fair?
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May 27, 2009 3:01:03 AM

I have a feeling that this idea of releasing two separate sockets for Nehalem is going to be one of Intel's biggest bad ideas since NetBurst.
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May 27, 2009 3:40:29 AM

mrubermonkeyI have a feeling that this idea of releasing two separate sockets for Nehalem is going to be one of Intel's biggest bad ideas since NetBurst.


I think it's certainly an interesting idea. In a way, it allows them to give high performance features to the enthusiast crowd, without having to be as price efficient to cater to everyone. They can use P55 as the gimped, cheaper option meant for budgets, not performance.

I can see it going either way, but the pricing of the i5's has me worried. If they perform aswell as the i7's what's the point? And the 2 most expensive i5's cost as much as the 2 least expensive i7's. What the hell is that about?
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May 27, 2009 3:59:28 AM

i5 initial TDP will be 95w. Come 1st Q of 2010, new i5s will be in the 65w TDP range.

i5 looks to be heading towards energy efficiency. Virtualization is probably at the forefront with these as well.

Can see the day where consumer PCs have a cloud type OS (hypothetical MS OS Virtual Cloud 2)running in the background with a VPC that takes daily snapshots for easy backup and restore (remote restore?). PC vendor customer service utopia.
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May 27, 2009 4:06:51 AM

Why are people asking what memory P55 chipset will support? It won't support DDR2 or DDR3, the processor will support DDR3 though. Chipsets don't have memory controllers anymore for the Nehalem. It's dual channel though, instead of having three channels, which will lower transfer rates, but should also lower latency a little, since dual channel setups have lower latency on the i7.

Probably it will use a little less power, for both the processor and the chipset, so it could be a very appealing platform.
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May 27, 2009 4:34:53 AM

Meh, I don't care whether it's dual channel, I really care more about the actual features and how much speed it truly gives overall. The fact it'll be priced with mobos about ~100 dollars cheaper, and a starting CPU about 80 dollars lower, this might actually be a good Phenom II buster ( provided the performance is all solid )
PCI-E 3.0, honestly, I have never heard of. Sounds like a waste to me, unless you just want to run quad SLI with GTX 395's on x4.... with little stutter. Whatever, they should have full x16 anyways.
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May 27, 2009 4:47:09 AM

Not interested, I will stick with my C2Duos 'till next generation. I have top GPUS and that's all I care about. 562 US$ for a freakin CPU? What's this, the 90's?
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May 27, 2009 4:53:03 AM

It's so obvious.....5 is a lower number than 7.....if you're going to wait for something wait for an 8 core cpu from intel and not a core i5. Personally, I think you should wait for the new 128bit CPU's that will be arriving shortly.
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May 27, 2009 5:28:34 AM

Quote:
Personally, I think you should wait for the new 128bit CPU's that will be arriving shortly.


Not sure there would be any benefit in that (at least for the next 5+ years)? 64 bit can support terrabytes of RAM as it is. Most people are still using 32 bit OSs. 99% of software is 32 bit. The world hasn't caught on to 64 bit yet, let alone thinking about 128 bit.
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May 27, 2009 8:01:36 AM

i was hearing these chips might actually be quicker because of integrated PCIe lanes in the cpu, but in saying that, Intel wont allow the 3+ PCIe 16x video card slots on i5 motherboards so as to push people to high end i7 setup's etc for more "hardcore" rigs with tri channel ram etc - see what happens tho
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May 27, 2009 2:21:34 PM

Correct me if I am wrong, but shouldn't they be trying to move forward -----> instead of backwards
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May 27, 2009 2:37:39 PM

wow....it cut off my entire post except for the first line. classic.

What I wanted to ask is...shouldn't Intel be creating an i9 to replace their "high-end" desktop chip and let the i7 become their "mainstream" chip? It seems wrong to move in the opposite direction just to compete with AMD. If they wanted real competition then create a new upper level and change the price points of the i7 to directly attack AMD prices.

For a better price, the new Phenom II chips will obliterate the i5 offerings. Right now the 955 can hold its own against Intel's best so I have a hard time understanding why anyone would spend money on a scaled back, weaker, more expensive i5 model than a a 955 BE.

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May 27, 2009 2:43:40 PM

Will it support intel's new hyperthreading like the i7 does? If so, I might be very interested in the i5 for a cheap(er) video encoding box.
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May 27, 2009 2:58:06 PM

These will be like the new core 2 duo's...upgraded basically which is great.
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May 27, 2009 3:08:31 PM

from 2.66 to 2.93 GHz, 270Mhz
from $196 to $562, $366.

I wonder how easy would it be to overclock these cpu's...
I mean, if you want a budget cpu, why in the world would you pay $366 extra for 270Mhz ?

I'll never understand the marketing people...
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May 27, 2009 3:36:14 PM

i5 will have Dual-Channel DDR3 support with its memory controller. It will lack Hyper-Treading (for the 2.6 and 2.8, not sure about the 2.93). Its a Quad-Core CPU, basically the same as the i7 and its Turbo mode won't go as high as the i7. I heard that i5 might have less L3 cache than the i7 also.

P55 will have a maximum of Two PCI-E 16X 2.0 slots (one at 16X, two at 8X each).
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May 27, 2009 4:01:23 PM

With the integrated graphics controller i5 might justify the pricing, as long as it gives some decent performance, preferably higher than today's GMA graphic controllers.

Still, as we know, PhII is about 20% slower than i7 at the extreme and as i5 is a little stripped down, it might well fall below PhII based systems.
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May 27, 2009 4:24:50 PM

TindytimAnd the 2 most expensive i5's cost as much as the 2 least expensive i7's. What the hell is that about?


It's because the i5's also contain a graphics chip, I believe, adding to the cost. And there's no way motherboards are going to be $250 from the get go. They will be 150-ish, 200 max I'd say. Look at all the recent cuts Intel chipset boards, especially older P35 boards. There are some dang good boards for under $100 now. The price per GHz seems to be on par with i7, although I was expecting them to be a little bit cheaper than these announced prices as well.

It is very interesting that they're going "backwards." If anything, however, this should REDUCE the cost of board manufacturing - no integrated graphics needed on the board at all. "Core i5 microprocessors will feature an integrated dual-channel DDR3 memory controller, integrated PCI-Express graphics controller and Direct Media Interface controller for communication with Intel P55 chipset."

I guess i7's are still going to be the most "hardcore" with triple channel compatibility and insane overclockability. i5's are really being released to deal a blow to AMD right now. They need more solid and modern competition for Phenom II, which is really taking it to Core 2 Quad right now dollar for dollar.
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May 27, 2009 4:32:13 PM

festerovic"The P55 chipset will be priced at US$40.”Is this a typo?

chipset does not equal motherboard
Those are crap tray prices on those cpu's though. I hope nobody ever buys them.
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May 27, 2009 5:33:41 PM

I read some of this stuff and wonder what people are thinking.

Intel needs solid competition for the Phenom II?????????? The Earth is flat? The Sun is cold? You're smart?

The Core 2 is considerably faster, and is a lot smaller than the Phenom II. In other words, outside of a few workloads, it's dramatically better. There's no comparision. It's cheaper to make too.

Phenom II is competitive on price though, because AMD is losing money. Intel does not more a "modern" processor to compete with the Phenom II. They could lower prices and destroy them. Even if they priced their Core 2s the same at the same clock speed, they'd seriously hurt the "modern" Phenom II, because it can't compete clock normalized.

The i5 is a good move. Actually, it made a lot of sense to release a high end chip first. What's the point of releasing a mediocre chip and then going higher? At the initial release, there would not be so much reason to buy them. This was typically how it was done long ago. The new chip would be very expensive, and high end. They would release lower end versions that moved them to the mainstream. Examples are the 386sx, 486sx, 8088, 80188, 80288 (the latter two were used mainly in embedded apps though, and rarely if ever in computers).

The i5 could offer better performance than the Core 2 at similar price points. If lower the price of the processors, and also the motherboard, the combination puts them much more squarely in the price range of the lesser Core 2, and the much lesser Phenom II. So, it could be a very popular and important release since it could finally bring Nehalem into more mainstream pricing.
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May 27, 2009 11:42:04 PM

Itll have 16x pci lanes for the graphics. Its dual channel DDR3. Itll have a very low power draw. It has turbo. Only the 2.66 model wont have HT. The 57 boards will be following the the 55s, with a better igp in them.
It looks to have the same perf as i7, in most apps, just not the tri channel, and of course limited pci lanes
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May 28, 2009 7:00:25 AM

@jaydeejohn: i5 chipsets or boards don't have IGP, as the IGP is integrated into CPU. About this, "touché" from intel againts AMD. Thing need to see is, how does this IGP on i5 compare to AMD's 780 IGP.
If it performs better, with the 95 W of power envelope for IGP+CPU, it might call trouble for AMD. If not, well, intel sells it anyway with "intel inside" program.
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May 28, 2009 9:36:51 AM

duzcizgiWith the integrated graphics controller i5 might justify the pricing, as long as it gives some decent performance, preferably higher than today's GMA graphic controllers.Still, as we know, PhII is about 20% slower than i7 at the extreme and as i5 is a little stripped down, it might well fall below PhII based systems.


Clock for clock the i7 is faster then Core2's - it cant fall below a Phenom II performance wise, as for pricing vs performance - we shall have to wait
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May 28, 2009 11:03:46 AM

apache_livesClock for clock the i7 is faster then Core2's - it cant fall below a Phenom II performance wise, as for pricing vs performance - we shall have to wait

Sorry, I wasn't clear in my previous post. I was comparing price-wise. Not clock for clock. I don't care at which speed the CPU runs, as long as it gives me the comparable/favorable performance at that given price point.
i5 will take a hit as it doesn't have 3 channel DDR3 but 2 channel DDR3 controller, making memory bandwidth-wise equal to PhII. The decisive point will be whether at a given price point i5 better or worse than competitor or not? In the segment it targets, cost is the most important. I expect mo-bo for i5 would be so cheap that they'll even throw it in as bundle for the CPU you buy. (the chipset's introduction price is $40-ish and with all the other necessary capacitors & connectors added, I guess the net cost of initial batches of mo-bos will be around $50, selling for a mere $60.) $196 for CPU+IGP + $60 for mo-bo + $40 for 2 GB DDR3 and another $100 for the rest of the necessary stuff, you can have a PC sufficient for office for about $400 + taxes. Not bad, I can say. and this is the introductory pricing. As time goes, the prices will drop significantly.
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July 16, 2009 9:59:08 AM

heres deal go here http://www.tomshardware.com/forum/255975-28-intel-core-...

it preforms identically and sometimes better than i7 and will be cheap as a platform itself. what does this mean? ram and MB wont cost 500-600 total. more like 300 for performance edged models (speculation). were told to expect entry level i5 to be under $200
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July 16, 2009 12:24:10 PM

It performs better, yes, but it have integrated video on die, and an onboard PCI-e controller, limiting the i5 platform to 16 PCI-e lanes. How many motherboard manufacturers are even going to include a PCI-e x16 bus? You're certainly not going to be running a Tri-SLI setup, and that's the only way you're going to see a benefit in a gaming applications. Since Tom's is only about gaming, they'll probably stick with the i7.
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