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Integrated Graphics Card vs. Additional Graphics Card

Last response: in Laptops & Notebooks
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June 6, 2012 2:54:57 AM

Hey guys-
I'm new to this site so let me know if I am missing anything in my post.
So I have been researching all day about Intel's new 3rd Gen i-series processors and I can't figure out exactly how the 'improved integrated GPU' works.

(1) If I were to buy a laptop with an Intel i7 3rd gen processor and also have a, say, NVIDIA GeForce GT 555M 3GB graphics card, how would they work together? Would the Integrated Graphics Card run when not much video memory is needed, and the NVIDIA would run when I am playing high requirement games?

(2) Would it be smart to save some money buying a 2nd Gen Intel processor if I am buying an additional video card (since from what I've read, the 3rd Gen Intel processors only provide ~5-10% increased processing power, and their main advantage is a better integrated GPU)?

(3) Just as a side note, would the Integrated GPU on the Intel Core i7-3610QM (2.3GHz) be able to handle newer games like Starcraft II or Diablo III?

I am sorry if I am not using some of this terminology correctly or if my questions seem confusing, as I am very new to this.

Thanks in advance,
Drew Mac
a c 87 U Graphics card
a b D Laptop
June 6, 2012 3:14:10 AM

Third gen Intel Core CPUs (Ivy Bridge) in laptops have a roughly 100% improvement in their IGP over that of the IGP used in the second gen Core CPUs (Sandy Bridge).

The IGP doesn't work with the Nvidia discrete card. The laptop can switch between them. IE a game should use the Nvidia card while light work should use the Intel IGP.
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June 6, 2012 3:18:57 AM

In regards to your 2nd question, are you still talking about a laptop? Because usually you can't add an aftermarket gpu to them.
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June 6, 2012 3:19:01 AM

captaincharisma said:
............

I don't deserve an explanation?
I apologized in advance for a reason.
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June 6, 2012 3:21:56 AM

And yes you should be able to play those games with the IGPU in that processor but at much lower settings/resolutions than a dedicated card.
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June 6, 2012 3:31:30 AM

tjensen_25 said:
In regards to your 2nd question, are you still talking about a laptop? Because usually you can't add an aftermarket gpu to them.


Thanks for your response. It is a laptop and here are the specs I created today:

HP dv6tqe series
$1,024.99
Screen Size 15.6”
OS: Windows 7 Home Premium 64B
Processor: Intel Core i7-3610QM (2.3GHz)

RAM: 8GB DDR3
HD: 1TB
Graphics Card: NVIDIA GeForce GT 650M Graphics (2GB I think) GDDR5

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a c 87 U Graphics card
a b D Laptop
June 6, 2012 3:33:19 AM

Star Craft II and Diablo III are two very light games, but the HD 4000 of the Ivy Bridge i7s and i5s on the laptop market would still only be able to play them with modest settings and resolutions. Still, the HD 4000 could play them.

If you want a mainly gaming laptop, then you could get a much cheaper AMD Llano A8 laptop that has a discrete card in Crossfire with the IGP of the A8. It will be pretty fast and much cheaper than an Intel/Nidia laptop with similar performance.
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June 6, 2012 4:04:25 AM

blazorthon said:
Star Craft II and Diablo III are two very light games, but the HD 4000 of the Ivy Bridge i7s and i5s on the laptop market would still only be able to play them with modest settings and resolutions. Still, the HD 4000 could play them.

If you want a mainly gaming laptop, then you could get a much cheaper AMD Llano A8 laptop that has a discrete card in Crossfire with the IGP of the A8. It will be pretty fast and much cheaper than an Intel/Nidia laptop with similar performance.



Blazorthon,
Thanks for the suggestion.
Do you have a recommended brand/custom building website? I'm looking for a laptop under 1200$.
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June 6, 2012 4:27:25 AM

Any AMD APU laptop you look at is going to be under $900(usually). You could upgrade RAM and switch out HDD for an SSD. AMD Just came out with their new APU series with 7xxx series IGPU's so if you go that direction It's a good time to do so.

Here is a link to Tom's Hardware's coverage of the new APU. If you plan on waiting a little bit, the A10 is due to be released soon.
http://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/a10-4600m-trinity-p...
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a c 87 U Graphics card
a b D Laptop
June 6, 2012 4:37:06 AM

http://www.shopping.hp.com/en_US/home-office/-/products...

Give it the A8-3550MX APU, Radeon 7690M, and either 6GB or 8GB or 1600MHz RAM in the customizing menu and it's got a lot of performance for a laptop of its price.

I'm still looking for a laptop with a Trinity APU instead of a Llano APU like the above Llano machine. If I find a few, then they will likely be better options, but the above configuration easily beats an Intel laptop with the Nvidia GT 555M and probably beats the GT 650 too, despite being a lot cheaper.
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June 6, 2012 4:56:34 AM

Thanks you guys the very good advice. It's kind of annoying shopping for a computer without a computer but I will def look into this tomorrow and will probably have a few more questions if you are willing to answer them.
Thanks again and I'll get back to you in the morning!
-Drew
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!