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Raid 0 or 1 on a Dell 8400?

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Anonymous
February 7, 2005 11:20:31 PM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

Would I be better off using a Raid 0 or Raid 1 on my Dell Dimension
8400? I currently have 2 WD 200GB SATA drives. I was contemplating
installing another 200GB SATA drive for my backup files. I will be
using this PC for mostly video editing, word processing, and general
Web surfing.


Thanks
-John-

More about : raid dell 8400

Anonymous
February 7, 2005 11:20:32 PM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

<whyme@nowhere.com> wrote in message
news:kiif01tjkd6pge0r6fi5ksnesaj8v4kipl@4ax.com...
> Would I be better off using a Raid 0 or Raid 1 on my Dell Dimension
> 8400? I currently have 2 WD 200GB SATA drives. I was contemplating
> installing another 200GB SATA drive for my backup files. I will be
> using this PC for mostly video editing, word processing, and general
> Web surfing.
>
>
> Thanks
> -John-

Use Raid1 if you want disk-failure protection, use Raid0 for performance.

I would suggest putting your OS and Apps on a Raid1 set, and put all your
video on a Raid0 set. That would give you the best balance between fault
tolerance and performance.

Conversely, you could use Raid 0+1 for reliability and performance, but you
would only get 1/2 of the storage capacity of your drives.

- NuTs
Anonymous
February 7, 2005 11:20:32 PM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

whyme,
I'd go for raid 1. Raid 0 is for speed but from what others have said
the advantage isn't that great plus you have twice the chance to loose
your data, if one of the drives fail data is all gone. With raid 1 you
have a mirrored image. The down side is that if a virus infects your
files it'll happen on both drives. Since my computer didn't come with
two drives (ebay) I use an external usb 2 drive to back up my data.
Paul


whyme@nowhere.com wrote:
> Would I be better off using a Raid 0 or Raid 1 on my Dell Dimension
> 8400? I currently have 2 WD 200GB SATA drives. I was contemplating
> installing another 200GB SATA drive for my backup files. I will be
> using this PC for mostly video editing, word processing, and general
> Web surfing.
>
>
> Thanks
> -John-
Related resources
Anonymous
February 7, 2005 11:20:32 PM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

If you don't know the difference in the two, you probably don't need to use
RAID period.
<whyme@nowhere.com> wrote in message
news:kiif01tjkd6pge0r6fi5ksnesaj8v4kipl@4ax.com...
> Would I be better off using a Raid 0 or Raid 1 on my Dell Dimension
> 8400? I currently have 2 WD 200GB SATA drives. I was contemplating
> installing another 200GB SATA drive for my backup files. I will be
> using this PC for mostly video editing, word processing, and general
> Web surfing.
>
>
> Thanks
> -John-
Anonymous
February 7, 2005 11:20:33 PM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

"NuTCrAcKeR" <nutcracker@internationalhacker.org> wrote:
>Use Raid1 if you want disk-failure protection, use Raid0 for performance.

Check first and see if Raid0 actually improves performance. Without a
hardware XOR engine, it may actually be slower. My built in RAID0
controller (ITE8211 based?) is _slower_ than separate drives...
Anonymous
February 7, 2005 11:20:33 PM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

"Aaron P." wrote:
>
> If you don't know the difference in the two, you probably don't need to use
> RAID period.

That's kinda what I was thinking.

Typically, a RAID1 configuration is used to mirror "mission critical"
data. While that term might sound a bit severe, the intention is to
enable the user to get up and running, ASAP, after a hard drive failure.

A good example would be a business that relies heavily on its computer
system, and can't afford ANY downtime (e.g., a bank).

Notan
Anonymous
February 7, 2005 11:20:34 PM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

> Typically, a RAID1 configuration is used to mirror "mission critical"
> data. While that term might sound a bit severe, the intention is to
> enable the user to get up and running, ASAP, after a hard drive failure.
>

Actually, Raid1 allows the computer to continue to function, with the data
intact WHILE the drive fails. There is no "getting up and running" involved,
because the systme never goes down. Replace the drive at the earliest
possible time to restore redundancy.

- NuTs
!