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Cheaper LCD Panels On the Way; Wallets Rejoice

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June 2, 2009 7:17:56 PM

Sweeeeeet! Everone loves the idea of low cost high quality TV's.
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June 2, 2009 7:41:43 PM

Aren't Hot Cathodes what they usually use in CRT's... I wish I knew more about this, I'm curious why they were previously using cold cathodes for LCDs and why they're switching now...
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June 2, 2009 7:46:22 PM

this means better blacks?? or just more brightness?
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June 2, 2009 8:06:09 PM

I still prefer the now so cheap CRTs. Can't beat their 40+ years of proven reliability :)  (And repairability... and uglyness... but I couldn't care less, 40$CAN for a 22 inches 1600x1200 85HZ screen for which I have spare parts, there's nothing to complain on this. Screw LCD.. and such :)  )
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June 2, 2009 8:06:12 PM

just more brightness.
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June 2, 2009 8:25:01 PM

Quote:
Most of all, Hitachi said that HCFL panels will require only two to three times less lamps, all while delivering more brightness.


Oh come on, you're KILLING me.

For some reason, Excel 07 doesn't like the formula "two to three times less"...
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June 2, 2009 8:26:31 PM

I have never repaired a CRT. Isn't that dangerous?

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June 2, 2009 8:29:14 PM

ksenterAren't Hot Cathodes what they usually use in CRT's... I wish I knew more about this, I'm curious why they were previously using cold cathodes for LCDs and why they're switching now...

I believe they are. Its amazing how often people look backwards and find a more efficient solution. Who knows why they used cold cathodes, probably just something they always did with LCDs, and no one bothered to consider hot cathodes until now.
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June 2, 2009 8:30:19 PM

joebob2000Oh come on, you're KILLING me.For some reason, Excel 07 doesn't like the formula "two to three times less"...

Yea that made me cringe too.

jacobdrjI have never repaired a CRT. Isn't that dangerous?

Yea. I think there are reasons why you can't throw CRT units away either. Something bad lol.

Hot Cathodes? Initially I would have thought this would be a bad switch from cold cathodes, but if it really does mean cheaper equal, or better quality LCDs, then I'm happy. I've been waiting for a sub $200 28" monitor.
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June 2, 2009 8:32:42 PM

jertherI still prefer the now so cheap CRTs. Can't beat their 40+ years of proven reliability (And repairability... and uglyness... but I couldn't care less, 40$CAN for a 22 inches 1600x1200 85HZ screen for which I have spare parts, there's nothing to complain on this. Screw LCD.. and such )

I bet it looks nice next to your LPs.
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June 2, 2009 8:38:07 PM

Very true. Much like we are now trying to reinvent our electric grid to DC. It is possible to do now, where in the 1800's it was impractical. Think of how much more efficient our grid will be when we don't have to use power supplies (AC adapters) on all our fans and electronics.
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June 2, 2009 8:39:49 PM

jertherI still prefer the now so cheap CRTs. Can't beat their 40+ years of proven reliability (And repairability... and uglyness... but I couldn't care less, 40$CAN for a 22 inches 1600x1200 85HZ screen for which I have spare parts, there's nothing to complain on this. Screw LCD.. and such )

Welcome to the future, we value progress here.
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June 2, 2009 8:55:40 PM

It looks very BAD. It's ugly and most of all HEAVY! But hey, I have no fun looking at it from behind and lifting it :) 

Of course this is old technology. But I still think it is worth the 40$ for such a high definition, which IMHO is more important than having the latest technology. But it's two different world: brand new and used stuff.

The headline states "Wallets rejoice". What kind of state of the art screen do you get for 40$? New, forget it. Used, there's a good chance of having something very good and that will still work in two years.

As for repair: it's not THAT dangerous. It's dangerous to hit it with a hammer or a mace. But you could even drop it and chances are that it won't even break. Have you dropped a TV? :)  Only the plastic takes the hit.

Voltages are high inside but don't carry much power. The real danger there is to take a shock and dropping off your chair on the neck.

In my job, I see so many LCD screens destroyed by people who still don't get that you DO NOT PUT YOUR FINGER IN THE SCREEN. I didn't see such things on CRTs and I wouldn't even dare dropping one.

Well, my whole point is not really relevant to the topic here, it's just about the wallet part ;)  I like technology. I just don't have the money to buy the latest, and that's why I prefer repairable electronics. I could go on forever on this.. maybe on an article that's more about it :) 
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Anonymous
June 2, 2009 9:01:09 PM

I won't know if it consumes less than OLED screen, since Oled already consumes less energy, while being brighter and more colorful. Would this be what they are talking about?
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Anonymous
June 2, 2009 9:06:28 PM

Does this mean like CTR and OLED that with a lot of bright sunlight it will be hard to see the screen?
On current TFT/LCD technology the sun can be used as backlight to light the screen
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June 2, 2009 9:59:48 PM

Hey, I still have my 21" Sony Trinitron CRT and game on it. I tried gaming on my nice 24" LCD but it really didn't work for me with the wide aspect ratio. Sadly the CRT is showing signs of age, it might have to go soon :(  Maybe I can get a smoking hot (har har) cathode LCD :) 
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June 2, 2009 10:47:05 PM

Me like.

Buying a brand new 1280x1024 LCD costs less than $100, so what will these be at?

The biggest thing I can think of a use for is my fathers laptop. The thing is a massive beast, and such resulting in a huge screen requiring a lot of power. This would make significant longer battery life.
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June 2, 2009 10:54:03 PM

I didn't see any mention of when this tech would be available.

@hellwig. The reason they haven't used the old style cathode is because they are huge. That is what took up the bulk of the CRT's. This scant article left all that pertinent info out. Hitachi must have come up with a way to make a hot cathode unit or units that were very slim.
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June 2, 2009 11:00:23 PM

This sounds nice. Hope they come out in the next 6 - 7 months so I can get a 32 - 37 inch TV.
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June 3, 2009 12:45:57 AM

Honestly I thought LCDs hit rock bottom for prices but lower prices are welcome but all means. True Story... I moved my 19" LCD monitor today to chase down some dust bunnies only to find a 15" LCD monitor tucked behind it. Holy bleep these things are so cheap that I forget that I even have them.
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June 3, 2009 12:51:21 AM

ksenterAren't Hot Cathodes what they usually use in CRT's... I wish I knew more about this, I'm curious why they were previously using cold cathodes for LCDs and why they're switching now...



No, CRT's are actually what the acronym stands for. Cathode Ray Tube's. Literally, a thick glass tube shaped in the proper manner, with the "front" or viewing side coated in a reactive phospherescent(sp?) material that generated a picture depending the intensity of the beam hitting it.
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June 3, 2009 1:44:22 AM

jertherAs for repair: it's not THAT dangerous. It's dangerous to hit it with a hammer or a mace. But you could even drop it and chances are that it won't even break. Have you dropped a TV? Only the plastic takes the hit.

Voltages are high inside but don't carry much power. The real danger there is to take a shock and dropping off your chair on the neck.


Last I checked the high voltage line in the CRTs would light you up enough to kill you. But that is easily mitigated by grounding your screw driver as you pop the plug out of the tube (not something to try unless you've been shown how to do it properly though). Also I've found hitting CRTs with hammers isn't that dangerous given that the tubes implode.
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Anonymous
June 3, 2009 4:02:44 AM

Will they last longer? Or will they commonly find themselves out with the evening trash? I think I'll stick with proven technology until this HCFL is matured. I don't want to buy a monitor at the same rate I buy incandescent light bulbs.
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June 3, 2009 5:35:04 AM

ram 2500I don't want to buy a monitor at the same rate I buy incandescent light bulbs.

LOL. New screen every few months or less :p 
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June 3, 2009 5:55:25 AM

nukemasterLOL. New screen every few months or less


But if they cost the same as light bulbs do you really care?
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June 3, 2009 7:02:33 AM

jacobdrjI have never repaired a CRT. Isn't that dangerous?


It's as dangerous as walking on a sidewalk. It can kill, you know?
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June 3, 2009 7:42:11 AM

Quote:
On a 32-inch display, a HCFL panel will require anywhere from four to six lamps, while an older CCFL display can take up to 14 lamps.


Hmm... There is another reason in using such a high number of lamps, besides brightness, which is color and brightness uniformity. All current LCDs more or less suffer from lack of uniformity. Now, I bet it would take quite a bit more engineering behind a HCFL panel, to avoid having it display bands of light... Wonder how thick the diffusing filters would make the panel.

And besides, I had enough with LCD tech already, no matter what method chosen for back lighting them - be it CCFL, HCFL or LED light bulbs or campfires... Shouldn't we be heading towards real OLED displays anyway? :( 
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June 3, 2009 9:18:26 AM

CRTs are dying. All Electronics die, sooner or later. TV repair shops have almost NO CRTs or Rear-projections TV on the bench nowadays. Because people aren't willing to spend the $$$ to repair them. A typical out-of-warrnaty projection TV repair is about $600. Parts are becoming a problem... again, why make parts for people who'd rather spend $800 on a 48" (720) TV or $1200+ on a 50+" 1080p TV... then spend $600 to repair a 4+ year old SD TV?

When my bedroom 13" SONY died last year, I did spend $70 on a used 27" SONY CRT (it needed a part) that would work with my other Sony A/V remotes... also, the TV has an excellent picture and huge add-on stereo speakers and 4 inputs. It retailed about $800 new. Funny thing, the style looks exactly like the 13" TV... but bigger. :) 

I am looking forward to buying an HD-TV LCD/whatever someday, maybe 2010.
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June 3, 2009 11:27:15 AM

demonhorde665
you sir are being a smart ass and an ill informed one at that, catho-ray tubes are infact very dangerous to repair on the back side of the CRT tube is electrically charged coil , the entire back of the tube is also charged by this coil , the charge is powerful enough to kill 20 people if they lined up and touched the back of the crt. Yes i know many people work on these often (my grandfather was always fixing this old black and white set he had). the tube usually disipates this charge after about 3 days of being turned off, making the tube safe to touch, however, in rare cases this electric charge has been know to last for 2-3 weeks. generally it is a very good idea to be really careful when working on old crt tv's. next time you should get better informed before mocking, and making sarcasm at some one else's question, especially when it is a very good question.

Offended easily? I do believe the mocking statement could be taken both ways. Yes it can be dangerous; If you think about it, just about anything can be dangerous. However, if you do a little research/are trained in CRT repair in some way, then the risk is not so great.

Anyways, this will be an interestin development. If this can replace the CCRTs with equal/better quality then perhaps I can finally get some more viewsonic professional series monitors for on the cheap.. $600 a piece is a hard bullet to swallow now. Great piece of hardware though.
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June 3, 2009 2:07:54 PM

Its about time...
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June 3, 2009 3:21:26 PM

ceterasIt's as dangerous as walking on a sidewalk. It can kill, you know?

And I do avoid it when possible. Were it my choice, I wouldn't drive. I have to drive, I don't have to repair a CRT, especially when the repair costs far exceed replacement, not to mention doing it yourself, without training, is probably putting yourself up to unnecessary risk.
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Wow, why are people so down about the fact that the power grid of the future is going to be DC?
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June 3, 2009 4:56:18 PM

jacobdrjWow, why are people so down about the fact that the power grid of the future is going to be DC?

I have never heard this befor. Can you cite some evidence to show that we are switching to DC? Forgive me for being skeptical, but there was a good reason we use AC today and switching the entire power grid to DC would be a monumental task. If we can't even switch to the metric system, I don't see how the hell we are going to switch our power system.
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June 3, 2009 6:08:05 PM

jacobdrjVery true. Much like we are now trying to reinvent our electric grid to DC. It is possible to do now, where in the 1800's it was impractical. Think of how much more efficient our grid will be when we don't have to use power supplies (AC adapters) on all our fans and electronics.




The only parts of our distribution grid that is DC (or ever will be DC) are long underwater interconnects and bulk transfer lines. Shielded underwater interconnects would create too much reactive power losses due to the capacitance between the conductor and the shielding using AC to make them practical for long links, and synchronizing AC grids isn't always feasable when connecting several grids that are on different generation networks, so they connect them with DC lines and use static AC inverters (which can be easily phase sync'ed) on the receiving end to convert back to AC that can be easily synchronized with the receiving network.
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June 3, 2009 7:56:04 PM

LeJayI bet it looks nice next to your LPs.

LP's still reproduce music better than anything that's been made since. SACD and DVD-A are close, but no cigar.
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June 3, 2009 8:26:52 PM

kato128Last I checked the high voltage line in the CRTs would light you up enough to kill you. But that is easily mitigated by grounding your screw driver as you pop the plug out of the tube (not something to try unless you've been shown how to do it properly though). Also I've found hitting CRTs with hammers isn't that dangerous given that the tubes implode.


It takes around 20 mA through the heart to cause something really bad. Maybe even less. This so small but given the body's resistance, this is hard to achieve and even harder to direct to the heart. Hell, there are people who survive to a lightning strike.

I really like the sideways analogy :)  There's also: If you took a bath, and slip on the soap bar.. OMG YOU COULD DIE!

And someone else brang a VERY GOOD point: repair cost often goes beyond replacement cost. And that's a shame IMHO, although it's good for progress. That's what is killing today's electronics techs.

As for hitting with a hammer, year the screen implodes, but glass chunks get thrown and rebounds from the inside and you could end up with some IN YOUR EYE AND DIE!!!

Haha, come on, it's nowhear near an A-Bomb :p  in fact I'm more frighten to play with a microwave oven than a 36" CRT TV. WAYYYY more frighten.
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June 7, 2009 6:07:39 PM

You MUST be stupid. I've had enough of yourincompetence, and I'm sick and tired of YESTERDAY news.

Sony already uses HDFL backlights in their Bravia TV sets, I'm talking avout products that are already on the market for some time. THIS IS NO NEWS, get over it!
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June 7, 2009 6:08:01 PM

You MUST be stupid. I've had enough of yourincompetence, and I'm sick and tired of YESTERDAY news.

Sony already uses HDFL backlights in their Bravia TV sets, I'm talking avout products that are already on the market for some time. THIS IS NO NEWS, get over it!
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