Cat 5e & Cat 6

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.broadbandnet.hardware,microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

Hi all,

Can I use cat 5e RJ-45 connectors and keystones with cat 6 cabling and still
be able to have the network get up to gigabit speeds?

I have attempted to dig up information on the internet and have found
nothing but contradicting information. Any information would be appreciated.

- Viperz

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5 answers Last reply
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  1. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.broadbandnet.hardware,microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

    "Viperz" wrote:
    > Can I use cat 5e RJ-45 connectors and keystones with
    > cat 6 cabling and still be able to have the network get up
    > to gigabit speeds?
    >
    > I have attempted to dig up information on the internet
    > and have found nothing but contradicting information.
    > Any information would be appreciated.


    Have you tried posting in "comp.dcom.cabling"? That
    is the most appropriate newsgroup for cabling questions.

    *TimDaniels*
  2. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.broadbandnet.hardware,microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

    In article <uqO2#l7vFHA.1716@TK2MSFTNGP10.phx.gbl>, some@body.com
    says...
    > Can I use cat 5e RJ-45 connectors and keystones with cat 6 cabling and still
    > be able to have the network get up to gigabit speeds?

    CAT5 alone supports GIG connections, even without E/6. If you use 5e
    keystone connectors, then you have a 5e connection with expensive cable.
    If you use CAT6 keystones with 5e cable you have a 5e
    installation/plant, but have nice keystones.

    If you do CAT5 properly, you can run GIG without any issues.

    --

    spam999free@rrohio.com
    remove 999 in order to email me
  3. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.broadbandnet.hardware,microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

    Thanx, that's just what I was hoping somebody would say. Is there a physical
    difference between the cat 5e and the 6 connectors? I know that the cat 6
    cables have thicker copper but I haven't been able to find anything on the
    connectors.


    "Leythos" <void@nowhere.lan> wrote in message
    news:MPG.1d9cf2d34affd98298a0f9@news-server.columbus.rr.com...
    > In article <uqO2#l7vFHA.1716@TK2MSFTNGP10.phx.gbl>, some@body.com
    > says...
    >> Can I use cat 5e RJ-45 connectors and keystones with cat 6 cabling and
    >> still
    >> be able to have the network get up to gigabit speeds?
    >
    > CAT5 alone supports GIG connections, even without E/6. If you use 5e
    > keystone connectors, then you have a 5e connection with expensive cable.
    > If you use CAT6 keystones with 5e cable you have a 5e
    > installation/plant, but have nice keystones.
    >
    > If you do CAT5 properly, you can run GIG without any issues.
    >
    > --
    >
    > spam999free@rrohio.com
    > remove 999 in order to email me
  4. Just learning a bit about this myself. This webpage may have some info useful to you - http://www.lanshack.com/cat5e-tutorial.asp#Chart
    From what I gather, the wire gage is the same between cat 5e and cat 6. The connectors are the same in that they will plug into each other but are made to different standards which effect performance. I've seen suggestions to the effect that if you are wiring a network and cannot afford the added cost of the terminations at cat 6 to go with the cat 6 wiring anyway as it is much easier to upgrade the terminations than to pull new wire. They say the wire itself is not much more expensive.
  5. 5e will run gigabit.

    6 will run gigabit. The major advantage to 6 is that the distance is somewhere around 640ft-700ft.

    There are more twists per inch in cat 6 than over cat 5e.

    other than that, they're the same wire and stuff.
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