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Display-is 1366-768 a problem?

Last response: in Laptops & Notebooks
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July 26, 2012 4:33:54 PM

I just found a note I'd scribbled in my pre-laptop shopping days: don't buy 1366x768 display. Is this really an issue? looking at ultrabooks for grad student use+movies and music but no gaming. Thanks
a b D Laptop
July 26, 2012 5:06:30 PM

I would say it's a matter of personal taste. Some people would be unhappy with such a low resolution, but for plenty of people it's not that big of a deal. The only possible issue I can see is that it's basically just a little over 720p, so if you're watching a 1080p video, it will have to be scaled down. That's basically it.
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July 26, 2012 5:23:44 PM

I recall seeing something on here that said there are some issues when displaying 1366x768 on a 15" screen. My memory on this is so vague that that is all the info I can offer, sorry. Hopefully some one will be able to expand.
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July 26, 2012 5:50:46 PM

Ceejae said:
I recall seeing something on here that said there are some issues when displaying 1366x768 on a 15" screen. My memory on this is so vague that that is all the info I can offer, sorry. Hopefully some one will be able to expand.


The only issue I see is the number of pixels on the screen. 1600x900 or higher might be a better option if you find yourself trying to work documents side-by-side in Windows 7.

Not sure how much you have to spend, but something like this (spec wise): http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168... is a good place to start.
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a b D Laptop
July 30, 2012 7:48:51 PM

For smaller displays, it's less of an issue. But you should make a point to avoid 1366x768 resolution in a 15.6" display, and 1600x900 resolution in a 17.3" display, when it is reasonable to do so. Such size/resolution combinations make things onscreen appear rather large, and displays with these size/resolution combinations are usually low-tier LCD panels with very poor image quality due to low contrast.

But there is still a fair variety of ultrabooks available with 13.3" / smaller displays with resolutions higher than 1366x768 and/or above-average image quality.

Tell us your budget.
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July 31, 2012 4:52:01 AM

Thanks again everyone, love the care and value of the replies. I'm really looking at the HP Envy 4-1038 for just under $800. it's for a grad student who's not into gaming but will watch some movies/videos on the computer.
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Best solution

a c 439 D Laptop
July 31, 2012 2:57:07 PM

A low resolution screen basically mean the desktop workspace will be a bit small for some people especially for those who do a lot of multi-tasking with various windows / programs open at the same time. It's a constant annoyance if you are trying to reference information from various sources at the same time because you will either have to constantly switch between windows or have all / most of the windows display on the screen at the same time, but the windows are not large enough to view all the information you are trying to reference.

Watching 1080p movies on a 1366x768 doesn't really present much of a problem. It is actually better to scale down a movie rather than scale up a movie to a higher resolution screen. There will be small decrease in video quality, but it will be offset by the physically small screen.
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a b D Laptop
July 31, 2012 3:31:30 PM

The poor contrast typical of a low-end laptop display will tend to be more of a detriment to image quality than media downscaling/upscaling would.
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August 2, 2012 12:13:53 AM

Best answer selected by MFeder.
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