Question 2

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.help_and_support (More info?)

I am confused about three things:

1. how come there are so many "independent" suppliers of security software?
MS seems to go out of its way to have an operating system that buggers
non-MS applications and self destructs in house applications over time, why
doesn't it provide a good security system with its OS?

2. Which of the independent Security applications is best? I have been a
"norton" user since 1985, so I kind of lean toward that brand, but I am not
married to it. McAffee seems to be popular, but I don't know if it really
has any distinct advantage over another brand. It is all very confusing.

3. There are a lot of links on this NG to independent gurus and problem
solvers. How do I know they can be trusted?

Really, all I want to do is use my computer in piece. I am spending way too
much of my time being a computer mechanic.

chuck
8 answers Last reply
More about question
  1. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.help_and_support (More info?)

    "persian ram" <chuck_petterson@excite.com> wrote in message
    news:u6bN9kvXFHA.2128@TK2MSFTNGP14.phx.gbl...
    >I am confused about three things:
    >
    > 1. how come there are so many "independent" suppliers of security
    > software?
    > MS seems to go out of its way to have an operating system that buggers
    > non-MS applications and self destructs in house applications over time,
    > why
    > doesn't it provide a good security system with its OS?
    >
    > 2. Which of the independent Security applications is best? I have been a
    > "norton" user since 1985, so I kind of lean toward that brand, but I am
    > not
    > married to it. McAffee seems to be popular, but I don't know if it really
    > has any distinct advantage over another brand. It is all very confusing.
    >
    > 3. There are a lot of links on this NG to independent gurus and problem
    > solvers. How do I know they can be trusted?
    >
    > Really, all I want to do is use my computer in piece. I am spending way
    > too
    > much of my time being a computer mechanic.
    >
    > chuck
    >
    >

    It's financially lucrative to compromise your computer and use it for
    nefarious purposes. As long as this is true some people will try to find a
    way to do it. Microsoft is in business to make money and rightly or wrongly
    have determined they can make more money by having more features rather than
    better security. This makes it easy for the bad guys. Most experts have
    their own favourite applications and methods for securing windows. Most of
    them work, some better than others. You'll have to do a bit of research and
    decide what's best for you. A router is a good first line of defence. Your
    post in another thread indicated you are on dialup so a router is probably
    out. There are routers for dialup but they are awkward to setup and use. On
    dialup installing SP2 and making sure the firewall is active or installing a
    third party firewall is a first step. Installing one antivirus app is the
    next step. Installing two or three antispyware apps is next. Be aware that
    several programs that claim to remove spyware actually distribute spyware.
    Lastly and most important practice safe computing. Unfortunately this means
    not surfing to questionable, but possibly interesting web sites, and not
    using p2p file sharing apps. A good place to start researching safe
    computing is here:

    http://www.aumha.org/a/health.htm

    Another excellent resource is this newsgroup. Search for posts by Shenan
    Stanley and read his tips on safe computing.

    Kerry
  2. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.help_and_support (More info?)

    In article <u6bN9kvXFHA.2128@TK2MSFTNGP14.phx.gbl>,
    chuck_petterson@excite.com says...
    > I am confused about three things:
    >
    > 1. how come there are so many "independent" suppliers of security software?

    Because there are people that don't take the time to learn to secure
    their machines and because the default settings of the OS make it prone
    to compromise.

    > MS seems to go out of its way to have an operating system that buggers
    > non-MS applications and self destructs in house applications over time, why
    > doesn't it provide a good security system with its OS?

    I've been doing this for almost 30 years and I don't think that MS does
    anything different in the above area (apps/problems), it's mostly a user
    issue when I see it.

    Security has always been a problem, as they moved from a non-secure
    platform to a still non-secure platform. The started with Businesses
    needing networks and they assumed they were also secure networks. It
    seemed like they jumped into the Internet arena without knowing how to
    change the OS and still give corporate users the same setups.

    > 2. Which of the independent Security applications is best? I have been a
    > "norton" user since 1985, so I kind of lean toward that brand, but I am not
    > married to it. McAffee seems to be popular, but I don't know if it really
    > has any distinct advantage over another brand. It is all very confusing.

    It really depends on your Internet connection and your own abilities. In
    most cases, all users should be behind a NAT device when connecting to
    the Internet with their computer(s). A NAT is the starting point.
    Personal Firewall/Security software, in the hands of the ignorant, does
    not protect the system, only gives a false sense of security.

    AV software, backed by quality/timely updates, is the next needed
    protection method.

    And then we get to users that don't protect their own system - meaning
    that they don't use a secured browser, use P2P File Sharing apps without
    knowing about all the bad things in them......

    > 3. There are a lot of links on this NG to independent gurus and problem
    > solvers. How do I know they can be trusted?

    You can't. You can only start to trust if you stay here long enough to
    learn about the people posting solutions.

    > Really, all I want to do is use my computer in piece. I am spending way too
    > much of my time being a computer mechanic.

    There are several documents on Microsofts site that tell users how to
    install securely, secure IE, and surf safely - try reading/following the
    directions.

    --
    --
    spam999free@rrohio.com
    remove 999 in order to email me
  3. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.help_and_support (More info?)

    Leythos,

    thanks for the response. Your suggestions were all good. I frequently get
    the updates from MS on both computers. I may not be as diligent as need be
    due to the inability to determine whether or not I really NEED the chnages.
    I am on a SLOW dial up line, and the upgrades are more often than not in the
    10s of megabyte range. Since MS insists that EVERY computer must be network
    capable, it complicates life for those of us who have stand alone machines.

    At least SP came on a disk (thank you MS).


    "Leythos" <void@nowhere.lan> wrote in message
    news:MPG.1cfa97c8b1c6f6269897d4@news-server.columbus.rr.com...
    > In article <u6bN9kvXFHA.2128@TK2MSFTNGP14.phx.gbl>,
    > chuck_petterson@excite.com says...
    > > I am confused about three things:
    > >
    > > 1. how come there are so many "independent" suppliers of security
    software?
    >
    > Because there are people that don't take the time to learn to secure
    > their machines and because the default settings of the OS make it prone
    > to compromise.
    >
    > > MS seems to go out of its way to have an operating system that buggers
    > > non-MS applications and self destructs in house applications over time,
    why
    > > doesn't it provide a good security system with its OS?
    >
    > I've been doing this for almost 30 years and I don't think that MS does
    > anything different in the above area (apps/problems), it's mostly a user
    > issue when I see it.
    >
    > Security has always been a problem, as they moved from a non-secure
    > platform to a still non-secure platform. The started with Businesses
    > needing networks and they assumed they were also secure networks. It
    > seemed like they jumped into the Internet arena without knowing how to
    > change the OS and still give corporate users the same setups.
    >
    > > 2. Which of the independent Security applications is best? I have been
    a
    > > "norton" user since 1985, so I kind of lean toward that brand, but I am
    not
    > > married to it. McAffee seems to be popular, but I don't know if it
    really
    > > has any distinct advantage over another brand. It is all very
    confusing.
    >
    > It really depends on your Internet connection and your own abilities. In
    > most cases, all users should be behind a NAT device when connecting to
    > the Internet with their computer(s). A NAT is the starting point.
    > Personal Firewall/Security software, in the hands of the ignorant, does
    > not protect the system, only gives a false sense of security.
    >
    > AV software, backed by quality/timely updates, is the next needed
    > protection method.
    >
    > And then we get to users that don't protect their own system - meaning
    > that they don't use a secured browser, use P2P File Sharing apps without
    > knowing about all the bad things in them......
    >
    > > 3. There are a lot of links on this NG to independent gurus and problem
    > > solvers. How do I know they can be trusted?
    >
    > You can't. You can only start to trust if you stay here long enough to
    > learn about the people posting solutions.
    >
    > > Really, all I want to do is use my computer in piece. I am spending way
    too
    > > much of my time being a computer mechanic.
    >
    > There are several documents on Microsofts site that tell users how to
    > install securely, secure IE, and surf safely - try reading/following the
    > directions.
    >
    > --
    > --
    > spam999free@rrohio.com
    > remove 999 in order to email me
  4. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.help_and_support (More info?)

    Persian

    I am presently on dialup too, but I still get the updates, some of which are
    quite large.. that is no excuse for not getting them..

    --
    Mike Hall
    MVP - Windows Shell/User
    http://dts-l.org/goodpost.htm


    "persian ram" <chuck_petterson@excite.com> wrote in message
    news:ehUqQ2vXFHA.2684@TK2MSFTNGP09.phx.gbl...
    > Leythos,
    >
    > thanks for the response. Your suggestions were all good. I frequently
    > get
    > the updates from MS on both computers. I may not be as diligent as need
    > be
    > due to the inability to determine whether or not I really NEED the
    > chnages.
    > I am on a SLOW dial up line, and the upgrades are more often than not in
    > the
    > 10s of megabyte range. Since MS insists that EVERY computer must be
    > network
    > capable, it complicates life for those of us who have stand alone
    > machines.
    >
    > At least SP came on a disk (thank you MS).
    >
    >
    > "Leythos" <void@nowhere.lan> wrote in message
    > news:MPG.1cfa97c8b1c6f6269897d4@news-server.columbus.rr.com...
    >> In article <u6bN9kvXFHA.2128@TK2MSFTNGP14.phx.gbl>,
    >> chuck_petterson@excite.com says...
    >> > I am confused about three things:
    >> >
    >> > 1. how come there are so many "independent" suppliers of security
    > software?
    >>
    >> Because there are people that don't take the time to learn to secure
    >> their machines and because the default settings of the OS make it prone
    >> to compromise.
    >>
    >> > MS seems to go out of its way to have an operating system that buggers
    >> > non-MS applications and self destructs in house applications over time,
    > why
    >> > doesn't it provide a good security system with its OS?
    >>
    >> I've been doing this for almost 30 years and I don't think that MS does
    >> anything different in the above area (apps/problems), it's mostly a user
    >> issue when I see it.
    >>
    >> Security has always been a problem, as they moved from a non-secure
    >> platform to a still non-secure platform. The started with Businesses
    >> needing networks and they assumed they were also secure networks. It
    >> seemed like they jumped into the Internet arena without knowing how to
    >> change the OS and still give corporate users the same setups.
    >>
    >> > 2. Which of the independent Security applications is best? I have
    >> > been
    > a
    >> > "norton" user since 1985, so I kind of lean toward that brand, but I am
    > not
    >> > married to it. McAffee seems to be popular, but I don't know if it
    > really
    >> > has any distinct advantage over another brand. It is all very
    > confusing.
    >>
    >> It really depends on your Internet connection and your own abilities. In
    >> most cases, all users should be behind a NAT device when connecting to
    >> the Internet with their computer(s). A NAT is the starting point.
    >> Personal Firewall/Security software, in the hands of the ignorant, does
    >> not protect the system, only gives a false sense of security.
    >>
    >> AV software, backed by quality/timely updates, is the next needed
    >> protection method.
    >>
    >> And then we get to users that don't protect their own system - meaning
    >> that they don't use a secured browser, use P2P File Sharing apps without
    >> knowing about all the bad things in them......
    >>
    >> > 3. There are a lot of links on this NG to independent gurus and problem
    >> > solvers. How do I know they can be trusted?
    >>
    >> You can't. You can only start to trust if you stay here long enough to
    >> learn about the people posting solutions.
    >>
    >> > Really, all I want to do is use my computer in piece. I am spending
    >> > way
    > too
    >> > much of my time being a computer mechanic.
    >>
    >> There are several documents on Microsofts site that tell users how to
    >> install securely, secure IE, and surf safely - try reading/following the
    >> directions.
    >>
    >> --
    >> --
    >> spam999free@rrohio.com
    >> remove 999 in order to email me
    >
    >
  5. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.help_and_support (More info?)

    Kerry and others,

    good replies from all, and I thank you. Wish I had a way of saving the e
    mail files. they are the only items I cannot back up. XP fixed that little
    convenice available in Windows 9x. :o(

    The infected computer had SP1 and all of the MS updates through a year ago.
    The size of the downloads from MS are frustrating on dialup. MS software
    engineers don't have to live with such an inconvenience, so I doubt they
    really consider such a factor. I have Norton anti virus and firewall with
    auto updates installed and I have been running two spy ware programs since
    the first of this year. Of course something snuck through despite my
    efforts.

    We don't do any p2p and the sites my wife visits one wouldn't associate with
    being a source for mischief. But, there you are.

    We try to practice safe computing, but it is just like birth control:
    abstinence is the only sure method of prevention.

    c'est le vie

    chuck


    "Kerry Brown" <kerry@kdbNOSPAMsys-tems.c*a*m> wrote in message
    news:#WB7dAwXFHA.616@TK2MSFTNGP12.phx.gbl...
    > "persian ram" <chuck_petterson@excite.com> wrote in message
    > news:u6bN9kvXFHA.2128@TK2MSFTNGP14.phx.gbl...
    > >I am confused about three things:
    > >
    > > 1. how come there are so many "independent" suppliers of security
    > > software?
    > > MS seems to go out of its way to have an operating system that buggers
    > > non-MS applications and self destructs in house applications over time,
    > > why
    > > doesn't it provide a good security system with its OS?
    > >
    > > 2. Which of the independent Security applications is best? I have been
    a
    > > "norton" user since 1985, so I kind of lean toward that brand, but I am
    > > not
    > > married to it. McAffee seems to be popular, but I don't know if it
    really
    > > has any distinct advantage over another brand. It is all very
    confusing.
    > >
    > > 3. There are a lot of links on this NG to independent gurus and problem
    > > solvers. How do I know they can be trusted?
    > >
    > > Really, all I want to do is use my computer in piece. I am spending way
    > > too
    > > much of my time being a computer mechanic.
    > >
    > > chuck
    > >
    > >
    >
    > It's financially lucrative to compromise your computer and use it for
    > nefarious purposes. As long as this is true some people will try to find a
    > way to do it. Microsoft is in business to make money and rightly or
    wrongly
    > have determined they can make more money by having more features rather
    than
    > better security. This makes it easy for the bad guys. Most experts have
    > their own favourite applications and methods for securing windows. Most of
    > them work, some better than others. You'll have to do a bit of research
    and
    > decide what's best for you. A router is a good first line of defence. Your
    > post in another thread indicated you are on dialup so a router is probably
    > out. There are routers for dialup but they are awkward to setup and use.
    On
    > dialup installing SP2 and making sure the firewall is active or installing
    a
    > third party firewall is a first step. Installing one antivirus app is the
    > next step. Installing two or three antispyware apps is next. Be aware that
    > several programs that claim to remove spyware actually distribute spyware.
    > Lastly and most important practice safe computing. Unfortunately this
    means
    > not surfing to questionable, but possibly interesting web sites, and not
    > using p2p file sharing apps. A good place to start researching safe
    > computing is here:
    >
    > http://www.aumha.org/a/health.htm
    >
    > Another excellent resource is this newsgroup. Search for posts by Shenan
    > Stanley and read his tips on safe computing.
    >
    > Kerry
    >
    >
  6. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.help_and_support (More info?)

    "persian ram" <chuck_petterson@excite.com> wrote in message
    news:%23vcmLbyXFHA.2076@TK2MSFTNGP15.phx.gbl...
    > Kerry and others,
    >
    > good replies from all, and I thank you. Wish I had a way of saving the e
    > mail files. they are the only items I cannot back up. XP fixed that
    > little
    > convenice available in Windows 9x. :o(
    >
    > The infected computer had SP1 and all of the MS updates through a year
    > ago.
    > The size of the downloads from MS are frustrating on dialup. MS software
    > engineers don't have to live with such an inconvenience, so I doubt they
    > really consider such a factor. I have Norton anti virus and firewall with
    > auto updates installed and I have been running two spy ware programs since
    > the first of this year. Of course something snuck through despite my
    > efforts.
    >
    > We don't do any p2p and the sites my wife visits one wouldn't associate
    > with
    > being a source for mischief. But, there you are.
    >
    > We try to practice safe computing, but it is just like birth control:
    > abstinence is the only sure method of prevention.
    >
    > c'est le vie
    >
    > chuck
    >
    >

    It's a rough and tumble world on the internet. I've seen computers infected
    by clicking on a link in a google search. They were redirected to a porno
    site and that was it. It took most of a day to clean it up.

    You can back up email quite easily. Here's a program to do it with Outlook
    Express:

    http://www.outlook-express-backup.com/

    You can also just copy the files to a backup folder or disk. In XP the files
    are usuallt here:

    C:\Documents and Settings\username\Local Settings\Application
    Data\Identities\{64177125-F9F1-46EA-BC2C-2C9ECD377813}\Microsoft\Outlook
    Express

    You have to have view hidden files on. Replace username with your user name.
    The number in curly brackets will vary.

    Kerry
    > "Kerry Brown" <kerry@kdbNOSPAMsys-tems.c*a*m> wrote in message
    > news:#WB7dAwXFHA.616@TK2MSFTNGP12.phx.gbl...
    >> "persian ram" <chuck_petterson@excite.com> wrote in message
    >> news:u6bN9kvXFHA.2128@TK2MSFTNGP14.phx.gbl...
    >> >I am confused about three things:
    >> >
    >> > 1. how come there are so many "independent" suppliers of security
    >> > software?
    >> > MS seems to go out of its way to have an operating system that buggers
    >> > non-MS applications and self destructs in house applications over time,
    >> > why
    >> > doesn't it provide a good security system with its OS?
    >> >
    >> > 2. Which of the independent Security applications is best? I have
    >> > been
    > a
    >> > "norton" user since 1985, so I kind of lean toward that brand, but I am
    >> > not
    >> > married to it. McAffee seems to be popular, but I don't know if it
    > really
    >> > has any distinct advantage over another brand. It is all very
    > confusing.
    >> >
    >> > 3. There are a lot of links on this NG to independent gurus and problem
    >> > solvers. How do I know they can be trusted?
    >> >
    >> > Really, all I want to do is use my computer in piece. I am spending
    >> > way
    >> > too
    >> > much of my time being a computer mechanic.
    >> >
    >> > chuck
    >> >
    >> >
    >>
    >> It's financially lucrative to compromise your computer and use it for
    >> nefarious purposes. As long as this is true some people will try to find
    >> a
    >> way to do it. Microsoft is in business to make money and rightly or
    > wrongly
    >> have determined they can make more money by having more features rather
    > than
    >> better security. This makes it easy for the bad guys. Most experts have
    >> their own favourite applications and methods for securing windows. Most
    >> of
    >> them work, some better than others. You'll have to do a bit of research
    > and
    >> decide what's best for you. A router is a good first line of defence.
    >> Your
    >> post in another thread indicated you are on dialup so a router is
    >> probably
    >> out. There are routers for dialup but they are awkward to setup and use.
    > On
    >> dialup installing SP2 and making sure the firewall is active or
    >> installing
    > a
    >> third party firewall is a first step. Installing one antivirus app is the
    >> next step. Installing two or three antispyware apps is next. Be aware
    >> that
    >> several programs that claim to remove spyware actually distribute
    >> spyware.
    >> Lastly and most important practice safe computing. Unfortunately this
    > means
    >> not surfing to questionable, but possibly interesting web sites, and not
    >> using p2p file sharing apps. A good place to start researching safe
    >> computing is here:
    >>
    >> http://www.aumha.org/a/health.htm
    >>
    >> Another excellent resource is this newsgroup. Search for posts by Shenan
    >> Stanley and read his tips on safe computing.
    >>
    >> Kerry
    >>
    >>
    >
    >
  7. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.help_and_support (More info?)

    Kerry,

    Thanks for this reply!!! This was fast to use and free!! It worked as
    advertised.

    Much more manageable than other suggestions!!

    chuck

    "Kerry Brown" <kerry@kdbNOSPAMsys-tems.c*a*m> wrote in message
    news:Oz2wN1yXFHA.616@TK2MSFTNGP12.phx.gbl...
    >
    > "persian ram" <chuck_petterson@excite.com> wrote in message
    > news:%23vcmLbyXFHA.2076@TK2MSFTNGP15.phx.gbl...
    > > Kerry and others,
    > >
    > > good replies from all, and I thank you. Wish I had a way of saving the
    e
    > > mail files. they are the only items I cannot back up. XP fixed that
    > > little
    > > convenice available in Windows 9x. :o(
    > >
    > > The infected computer had SP1 and all of the MS updates through a year
    > > ago.
    > > The size of the downloads from MS are frustrating on dialup. MS
    software
    > > engineers don't have to live with such an inconvenience, so I doubt they
    > > really consider such a factor. I have Norton anti virus and firewall
    with
    > > auto updates installed and I have been running two spy ware programs
    since
    > > the first of this year. Of course something snuck through despite my
    > > efforts.
    > >
    > > We don't do any p2p and the sites my wife visits one wouldn't associate
    > > with
    > > being a source for mischief. But, there you are.
    > >
    > > We try to practice safe computing, but it is just like birth control:
    > > abstinence is the only sure method of prevention.
    > >
    > > c'est le vie
    > >
    > > chuck
    > >
    > >
    >
    > It's a rough and tumble world on the internet. I've seen computers
    infected
    > by clicking on a link in a google search. They were redirected to a porno
    > site and that was it. It took most of a day to clean it up.
    >
    > You can back up email quite easily. Here's a program to do it with Outlook
    > Express:
    >
    > http://www.outlook-express-backup.com/
    >
    > You can also just copy the files to a backup folder or disk. In XP the
    files
    > are usuallt here:
    >
    > C:\Documents and Settings\username\Local Settings\Application
    > Data\Identities\{64177125-F9F1-46EA-BC2C-2C9ECD377813}\Microsoft\Outlook
    > Express
    >
    > You have to have view hidden files on. Replace username with your user
    name.
    > The number in curly brackets will vary.
    >
    > Kerry
    > > "Kerry Brown" <kerry@kdbNOSPAMsys-tems.c*a*m> wrote in message
    > > news:#WB7dAwXFHA.616@TK2MSFTNGP12.phx.gbl...
    > >> "persian ram" <chuck_petterson@excite.com> wrote in message
    > >> news:u6bN9kvXFHA.2128@TK2MSFTNGP14.phx.gbl...
    > >> >I am confused about three things:
    > >> >
    > >> > 1. how come there are so many "independent" suppliers of security
    > >> > software?
    > >> > MS seems to go out of its way to have an operating system that
    buggers
    > >> > non-MS applications and self destructs in house applications over
    time,
    > >> > why
    > >> > doesn't it provide a good security system with its OS?
    > >> >
    > >> > 2. Which of the independent Security applications is best? I have
    > >> > been
    > > a
    > >> > "norton" user since 1985, so I kind of lean toward that brand, but I
    am
    > >> > not
    > >> > married to it. McAffee seems to be popular, but I don't know if it
    > > really
    > >> > has any distinct advantage over another brand. It is all very
    > > confusing.
    > >> >
    > >> > 3. There are a lot of links on this NG to independent gurus and
    problem
    > >> > solvers. How do I know they can be trusted?
    > >> >
    > >> > Really, all I want to do is use my computer in piece. I am spending
    > >> > way
    > >> > too
    > >> > much of my time being a computer mechanic.
    > >> >
    > >> > chuck
    > >> >
    > >> >
    > >>
    > >> It's financially lucrative to compromise your computer and use it for
    > >> nefarious purposes. As long as this is true some people will try to
    find
    > >> a
    > >> way to do it. Microsoft is in business to make money and rightly or
    > > wrongly
    > >> have determined they can make more money by having more features rather
    > > than
    > >> better security. This makes it easy for the bad guys. Most experts have
    > >> their own favourite applications and methods for securing windows. Most
    > >> of
    > >> them work, some better than others. You'll have to do a bit of research
    > > and
    > >> decide what's best for you. A router is a good first line of defence.
    > >> Your
    > >> post in another thread indicated you are on dialup so a router is
    > >> probably
    > >> out. There are routers for dialup but they are awkward to setup and
    use.
    > > On
    > >> dialup installing SP2 and making sure the firewall is active or
    > >> installing
    > > a
    > >> third party firewall is a first step. Installing one antivirus app is
    the
    > >> next step. Installing two or three antispyware apps is next. Be aware
    > >> that
    > >> several programs that claim to remove spyware actually distribute
    > >> spyware.
    > >> Lastly and most important practice safe computing. Unfortunately this
    > > means
    > >> not surfing to questionable, but possibly interesting web sites, and
    not
    > >> using p2p file sharing apps. A good place to start researching safe
    > >> computing is here:
    > >>
    > >> http://www.aumha.org/a/health.htm
    > >>
    > >> Another excellent resource is this newsgroup. Search for posts by
    Shenan
    > >> Stanley and read his tips on safe computing.
    > >>
    > >> Kerry
    > >>
    > >>
    > >
    > >
    >
    >
  8. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.help_and_support (More info?)

    "persian ram" <chuck_petterson@excite.com> wrote in message
    news:%23TvKabVYFHA.980@TK2MSFTNGP12.phx.gbl...
    > Kerry,
    >
    > Thanks for this reply!!! This was fast to use and free!! It worked as
    > advertised.
    >
    > Much more manageable than other suggestions!!
    >
    > chuck

    Glad it worked. Did you download the backup program or just copy the files?

    Kerry

    >
    > "Kerry Brown" <kerry@kdbNOSPAMsys-tems.c*a*m> wrote in message
    > news:Oz2wN1yXFHA.616@TK2MSFTNGP12.phx.gbl...
    >>
    >> "persian ram" <chuck_petterson@excite.com> wrote in message
    >> news:%23vcmLbyXFHA.2076@TK2MSFTNGP15.phx.gbl...
    >> > Kerry and others,
    >> >
    >> > good replies from all, and I thank you. Wish I had a way of saving the
    > e
    >> > mail files. they are the only items I cannot back up. XP fixed that
    >> > little
    >> > convenice available in Windows 9x. :o(
    >> >
    >> > The infected computer had SP1 and all of the MS updates through a year
    >> > ago.
    >> > The size of the downloads from MS are frustrating on dialup. MS
    > software
    >> > engineers don't have to live with such an inconvenience, so I doubt
    >> > they
    >> > really consider such a factor. I have Norton anti virus and firewall
    > with
    >> > auto updates installed and I have been running two spy ware programs
    > since
    >> > the first of this year. Of course something snuck through despite my
    >> > efforts.
    >> >
    >> > We don't do any p2p and the sites my wife visits one wouldn't associate
    >> > with
    >> > being a source for mischief. But, there you are.
    >> >
    >> > We try to practice safe computing, but it is just like birth control:
    >> > abstinence is the only sure method of prevention.
    >> >
    >> > c'est le vie
    >> >
    >> > chuck
    >> >
    >> >
    >>
    >> It's a rough and tumble world on the internet. I've seen computers
    > infected
    >> by clicking on a link in a google search. They were redirected to a porno
    >> site and that was it. It took most of a day to clean it up.
    >>
    >> You can back up email quite easily. Here's a program to do it with
    >> Outlook
    >> Express:
    >>
    >> http://www.outlook-express-backup.com/
    >>
    >> You can also just copy the files to a backup folder or disk. In XP the
    > files
    >> are usuallt here:
    >>
    >> C:\Documents and Settings\username\Local Settings\Application
    >> Data\Identities\{64177125-F9F1-46EA-BC2C-2C9ECD377813}\Microsoft\Outlook
    >> Express
    >>
    >> You have to have view hidden files on. Replace username with your user
    > name.
    >> The number in curly brackets will vary.
    >>
    >> Kerry
    >> > "Kerry Brown" <kerry@kdbNOSPAMsys-tems.c*a*m> wrote in message
    >> > news:#WB7dAwXFHA.616@TK2MSFTNGP12.phx.gbl...
    >> >> "persian ram" <chuck_petterson@excite.com> wrote in message
    >> >> news:u6bN9kvXFHA.2128@TK2MSFTNGP14.phx.gbl...
    >> >> >I am confused about three things:
    >> >> >
    >> >> > 1. how come there are so many "independent" suppliers of security
    >> >> > software?
    >> >> > MS seems to go out of its way to have an operating system that
    > buggers
    >> >> > non-MS applications and self destructs in house applications over
    > time,
    >> >> > why
    >> >> > doesn't it provide a good security system with its OS?
    >> >> >
    >> >> > 2. Which of the independent Security applications is best? I have
    >> >> > been
    >> > a
    >> >> > "norton" user since 1985, so I kind of lean toward that brand, but I
    > am
    >> >> > not
    >> >> > married to it. McAffee seems to be popular, but I don't know if it
    >> > really
    >> >> > has any distinct advantage over another brand. It is all very
    >> > confusing.
    >> >> >
    >> >> > 3. There are a lot of links on this NG to independent gurus and
    > problem
    >> >> > solvers. How do I know they can be trusted?
    >> >> >
    >> >> > Really, all I want to do is use my computer in piece. I am spending
    >> >> > way
    >> >> > too
    >> >> > much of my time being a computer mechanic.
    >> >> >
    >> >> > chuck
    >> >> >
    >> >> >
    >> >>
    >> >> It's financially lucrative to compromise your computer and use it for
    >> >> nefarious purposes. As long as this is true some people will try to
    > find
    >> >> a
    >> >> way to do it. Microsoft is in business to make money and rightly or
    >> > wrongly
    >> >> have determined they can make more money by having more features
    >> >> rather
    >> > than
    >> >> better security. This makes it easy for the bad guys. Most experts
    >> >> have
    >> >> their own favourite applications and methods for securing windows.
    >> >> Most
    >> >> of
    >> >> them work, some better than others. You'll have to do a bit of
    >> >> research
    >> > and
    >> >> decide what's best for you. A router is a good first line of defence.
    >> >> Your
    >> >> post in another thread indicated you are on dialup so a router is
    >> >> probably
    >> >> out. There are routers for dialup but they are awkward to setup and
    > use.
    >> > On
    >> >> dialup installing SP2 and making sure the firewall is active or
    >> >> installing
    >> > a
    >> >> third party firewall is a first step. Installing one antivirus app is
    > the
    >> >> next step. Installing two or three antispyware apps is next. Be aware
    >> >> that
    >> >> several programs that claim to remove spyware actually distribute
    >> >> spyware.
    >> >> Lastly and most important practice safe computing. Unfortunately this
    >> > means
    >> >> not surfing to questionable, but possibly interesting web sites, and
    > not
    >> >> using p2p file sharing apps. A good place to start researching safe
    >> >> computing is here:
    >> >>
    >> >> http://www.aumha.org/a/health.htm
    >> >>
    >> >> Another excellent resource is this newsgroup. Search for posts by
    > Shenan
    >> >> Stanley and read his tips on safe computing.
    >> >>
    >> >> Kerry
    >> >>
    >> >>
    >> >
    >> >
    >>
    >>
    >
    >
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