Sign in with
Sign up | Sign in
Your question

Computer Has g Adapter - Router Is b - Any Hope?

Last response: in Wireless Networking
Share
April 9, 2004 1:39:14 AM

Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

I just bought a new HP laptop with a built-in wireless adapter. It is
a Broadcom 54g MaxPerformance 802.11g. I didn't know when I bought it
that it was not g/b. My router, and most of my system is the b spec.
Is there anything I can do besides replacing all my b hardware?

Dick
Anonymous
April 9, 2004 9:33:49 AM

Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

Dick <LeadWinger> wrote in news:s1ac709iu8e0b7mn97jrvev0vj5npkiup6@4ax.com:

> Is there anything I can do besides replacing all my b hardware?

G is backwards compatible with B.

--
Lucas Tam (REMOVEnntp@rogers.com)
Please delete "REMOVE" from the e-mail address when replying.
http://members.ebay.com/aboutme/coolspot18/
April 9, 2004 9:33:50 AM

Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

On Fri, 09 Apr 2004 05:33:49 GMT, Lucas Tam <REMOVEnntp@rogers.com>
wrote:

>Dick <LeadWinger> wrote in news:s1ac709iu8e0b7mn97jrvev0vj5npkiup6@4ax.com:
>
>> Is there anything I can do besides replacing all my b hardware?
>
>G is backwards compatible with B.

The Broadcom 54g with Afterburner is significantly faster than a
normal g adapter. The spec says it is backwards compatible with the
normal g standard, but says nothing about compatibility with the b
standard.
Related resources
Anonymous
April 9, 2004 9:33:51 AM

Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

Broadcom Ships New 54gT Technology that Delivers Best Real-World
Wi-FiĀ® Performance

802.11g Standards Enhancement Provides Additional Speed for Home
Wireless Networks While Remaining Compatible with All Wi-Fi CERTIFIEDT
802.11b/g Products


"Dick" <LeadWinger> wrote in message
news:c9gc701009g7dm0kg5nq433uh29rbnqqkr@4ax.com...
> On Fri, 09 Apr 2004 05:33:49 GMT, Lucas Tam <REMOVEnntp@rogers.com>
> wrote:
>
>>Dick <LeadWinger> wrote in
>>news:s1ac709iu8e0b7mn97jrvev0vj5npkiup6@4ax.com:
>>
>>> Is there anything I can do besides replacing all my b hardware?
>>
>>G is backwards compatible with B.
>
> The Broadcom 54g with Afterburner is significantly faster than a
> normal g adapter. The spec says it is backwards compatible with the
> normal g standard, but says nothing about compatibility with the b
> standard.
Anonymous
April 9, 2004 5:55:51 PM

Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

Dick <LeadWinger> wrote:

> I just bought a new HP laptop with a built-in wireless adapter. It is
> a Broadcom 54g MaxPerformance 802.11g. I didn't know when I bought it
> that it was not g/b. My router, and most of my system is the b spec.
> Is there anything I can do besides replacing all my b hardware?

You're fine. "g" hardware supports connections with "b", though only that
the lower "b" speed.

--

Fundamentalism is fundamentally wrong.

To reply to this message, replace everything to the left of "@" with
james.knott.
April 9, 2004 5:55:52 PM

Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

On Fri, 09 Apr 2004 13:55:51 GMT, James Knott <bit_bucket@rogers.com>
wrote:

>Dick <LeadWinger> wrote:
>
>> I just bought a new HP laptop with a built-in wireless adapter. It is
>> a Broadcom 54g MaxPerformance 802.11g. I didn't know when I bought it
>> that it was not g/b. My router, and most of my system is the b spec.
>> Is there anything I can do besides replacing all my b hardware?
>
>You're fine. "g" hardware supports connections with "b", though only that
>the lower "b" speed.

Others have said the same, but the adapter is seeing two networks from
neighbors, but doesn't see mine.

Dick
Anonymous
April 9, 2004 5:56:48 PM

Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

Dick <LeadWinger> wrote:

> On Fri, 09 Apr 2004 05:33:49 GMT, Lucas Tam <REMOVEnntp@rogers.com>
> wrote:
>
>>Dick <LeadWinger> wrote in
>>news:s1ac709iu8e0b7mn97jrvev0vj5npkiup6@4ax.com:
>>
>>> Is there anything I can do besides replacing all my b hardware?
>>
>>G is backwards compatible with B.
>
> The Broadcom 54g with Afterburner is significantly faster than a
> normal g adapter. The spec says it is backwards compatible with the
> normal g standard, but says nothing about compatibility with the b
> standard.

As I recall, backwards compatibility with 802.11b, is a requirement for
802.11g hardware.

--

Fundamentalism is fundamentally wrong.

To reply to this message, replace everything to the left of "@" with
james.knott.
April 10, 2004 8:37:38 PM

Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

In article <avhd70llibldc0keaplusc7ibp02q3ii79@4ax.com>, Dick <LeadWinger> wrote:
>On Fri, 09 Apr 2004 13:55:51 GMT, James Knott <bit_bucket@rogers.com>
>wrote:
>
>>Dick <LeadWinger> wrote:
>>
>>> I just bought a new HP laptop with a built-in wireless adapter. It is
>>> a Broadcom 54g MaxPerformance 802.11g. I didn't know when I bought it
>>> that it was not g/b. My router, and most of my system is the b spec.
>>> Is there anything I can do besides replacing all my b hardware?
>>
>>You're fine. "g" hardware supports connections with "b", though only that
>>the lower "b" speed.
>
>Others have said the same, but the adapter is seeing two networks from
>neighbors, but doesn't see mine.
>
>Dick

SSID turned on aa the AP? Get right next to your AP and rescan for networks
(card likely prefers the faster networks, but should see your fine). I know
this sounds silly, but the AP is turned on...
April 11, 2004 7:32:47 PM

Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

On Sat, 10 Apr 2004 16:37:38 GMT, rico_001@hotmail.com (Rico) wrote:

>In article <avhd70llibldc0keaplusc7ibp02q3ii79@4ax.com>, Dick <LeadWinger> wrote:
>>On Fri, 09 Apr 2004 13:55:51 GMT, James Knott <bit_bucket@rogers.com>
>>wrote:
>>
>>>Dick <LeadWinger> wrote:
>>>
>>>> I just bought a new HP laptop with a built-in wireless adapter. It is
>>>> a Broadcom 54g MaxPerformance 802.11g. I didn't know when I bought it
>>>> that it was not g/b. My router, and most of my system is the b spec.
>>>> Is there anything I can do besides replacing all my b hardware?
>>>
>>>You're fine. "g" hardware supports connections with "b", though only that
>>>the lower "b" speed.
>>
>>Others have said the same, but the adapter is seeing two networks from
>>neighbors, but doesn't see mine.
>>
>>Dick
>
>SSID turned on aa the AP? Get right next to your AP and rescan for networks
>(card likely prefers the faster networks, but should see your fine). I know
>this sounds silly, but the AP is turned on...

I solved my problem , but don't know why. I changed the security key
from 128-bit to 64-bit, and all computers now see each other. What is
puzzling is that the router and all adapters are spec'd for 128-bit
security. I had been using 128-bit all along with my "B" network.
But when I added the new laptop with the Broadcom "G" adapter, it
couldn't connect no matter what I did. It's fixed, so I'm happy, but
would rather have 128-bit.

Dick
April 13, 2004 12:39:38 AM

Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

In article <nkhj70ddhth8q4bnq2bnfjcesv2vnukd4i@4ax.com>, Dick <LeadWinger> wrote:
>On Sat, 10 Apr 2004 16:37:38 GMT, rico_001@hotmail.com (Rico) wrote:
>
>>In article <avhd70llibldc0keaplusc7ibp02q3ii79@4ax.com>, Dick <LeadWinger>
> wrote:
>>>On Fri, 09 Apr 2004 13:55:51 GMT, James Knott <bit_bucket@rogers.com>
>>>wrote:
>>>
>>>>Dick <LeadWinger> wrote:
>>>>
>>>>> I just bought a new HP laptop with a built-in wireless adapter. It is
>>>>> a Broadcom 54g MaxPerformance 802.11g. I didn't know when I bought it
>>>>> that it was not g/b. My router, and most of my system is the b spec.
>>>>> Is there anything I can do besides replacing all my b hardware?
>>>>
>>>>You're fine. "g" hardware supports connections with "b", though only that
>>>>the lower "b" speed.
>>>
>>>Others have said the same, but the adapter is seeing two networks from
>>>neighbors, but doesn't see mine.
>>>
>>>Dick
>>
>>SSID turned on aa the AP? Get right next to your AP and rescan for networks
>>(card likely prefers the faster networks, but should see your fine). I know
>>this sounds silly, but the AP is turned on...
>
>I solved my problem , but don't know why. I changed the security key
>from 128-bit to 64-bit, and all computers now see each other. What is
>puzzling is that the router and all adapters are spec'd for 128-bit
>security. I had been using 128-bit all along with my "B" network.
>But when I added the new laptop with the Broadcom "G" adapter, it
>couldn't connect no matter what I did. It's fixed, so I'm happy, but
>would rather have 128-bit.
>
>Dick

Sounds like a vendor issue. I'd see if Broadcom has a new driver available.
Note also whenever you encounter a similar issue turn off all encryption
and such until things are seeing each other and working, then start
encryption and security. Until the thing works, there is nothing to
secure...
!