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OEM versions of Win 7 require registration with MS

Last response: in Windows 7
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July 2, 2010 5:06:16 AM

Sorry Microsoft,
Some the distributors don't relay the fact that OEM versions of windows for system builders are for those registered with MS.
The OEM versions include a link to MS support to register and obtain pre-insatallation software.
All info is included on the sealed exterior packaging, so that you can register before opening the software.
Rookie mistake on my part.
a b $ Windows 7
July 2, 2010 11:58:56 AM

I assume you've installed all the latest drivers for Windows 7 for your motherboard? Gigabyte boards are usually pretty good. I know I have one (not the same model as yours), and it has worked flawlessly with Windows 7.
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July 2, 2010 10:01:08 PM

isamuelson,
My ignorance. OEM versions of windows require registering with microsoft and obtaining a pre-installation download for system builders.
I'll be updating this post shortly to inform others. Distributors don't specify the need to register with MS, only that OEM's are for system builders.
Gigabyte mobos are in both of my recent AMD builds. Not any issues with them at all. Definitely top end boards as far as quality and support.
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a b $ Windows 7
July 2, 2010 10:35:58 PM

jockey said:
Sorry Microsoft,
Some the distributors don't relay the fact that OEM versions of windows for system builders are for those registered with MS.
The OEM versions include a link to MS support to register and obtain pre-insatallation software.
All info is included on the sealed exterior packaging, so that you can register before opening the software.
Rookie mistake on my part.

It's unfortunate that Microsoft changed the conditions of the OEM license.
Forcing us to buy full versions has the benefit that when you change motherboards and cpu's or moving it to another pc we can keep using the same license.
On the other hand if we want to build a new system and sell the old one, we either have to pay full price for a new OS or remove the old one. This makes for a very expensive upgrade.
Secondhand systems don't bring much of a price as it is and without an OS they become virtually worthless.
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a b $ Windows 7
July 2, 2010 10:44:58 PM

What, has this chaged? Earlier this year I bought 2-OEM Win 7 Home, and installed them flawlessly.

Now, I know that OEM software will be bound to the CPU/mobo they are installed on, as part of the EULA. So I can't activate it on another computer system.

And, in order to qualify to buy OEM software, you must buy some other hardware. That's how retailer get around the EULA. You can even buy a SATA cable, and get a OEM copy of WIndows. I don't know if retailers are sticklers for this, cause everytime I've bought OEM, I also bought some hardware at the same time anyway. Like I had to buy a DVD drive, to even install Win 7.

But, if you buy a full version, and upgrade a number of components in the case, you can still install WIn 7, and not be in violation.

Right?

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a b $ Windows 7
July 2, 2010 10:50:31 PM

I don't know when the license change came in, I did read it somewhere before, I will try to find out, you shouldn't be effected.
You now need to be a registered systems builder as jockey said.
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July 3, 2010 12:00:35 AM

Jonmor68 said:
You now need to be a registered systems builder as jockey said.


That's crazy; sounds like Microsoft want to give me another reason to dump Windows completely....
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July 3, 2010 1:12:04 AM

I still have two OEM xp's from laptops and I am able to use both of them. I have two systems running off of one version. Maybe the same can be done with 7. My opinion is, if you bought, you own it. Just don't be a pirate.
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July 3, 2010 2:54:15 AM

Jonmor68 said:
It's unfortunate that Microsoft changed the conditions of the OEM license.
Forcing us to buy full versions has the benefit that when you change motherboards and cpu's or moving it to another pc we can keep using the same license.
On the other hand if we want to build a new system and sell the old one, we either have to pay full price for a new OS or remove the old one. This makes for a very expensive upgrade.
Secondhand systems don't bring much of a price as it is and without an OS they become virtually worthless.

What about when a consumer buys a pre-assembled system. Aren't they allowed to upgrade?
My OEM copy came with an activation code sticker to be applied to a system case. I would think that the case should be allowed upgrades of any components without losing windows licensing.
So many different issues with 7 out there. (Maybe the Vista ghost is haunting it!)
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a b $ Windows 7
July 3, 2010 5:16:15 AM

You can upgrade as long as you don't change the motherboard and cpu to a different type.
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a b $ Windows 7
July 3, 2010 12:37:58 PM

jockey said:
What about when a consumer buys a pre-assembled system. Aren't they allowed to upgrade?
My OEM copy came with an activation code sticker to be applied to a system case. I would think that the case should be allowed upgrades of any components without losing windows licensing.
So many different issues with 7 out there. (Maybe the Vista ghost is haunting it!)


Hi Jockey, are you saying that you can no longer get an oem version unless you are registered with MS as a builder?
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July 4, 2010 9:35:41 PM

13thmonkey said:
Hi Jockey, are you saying that you can no longer get an oem version unless you are registered with MS as a builder?

You can still purchase an OEM without being a registered builder.
UPDATE:
Left Win7 disc in rom overnight, woke up to install options.
Don't know how long it took, but I am up and running: install was successful without OPK or registration with MS.
I waited for more than an hour on previous install attempts without any HDD or ROM drive activity.
If anyone else has any problems with OEM's, let me know, I've searched and bookmarked pages of info that may be helpful, as it seems to me there have been various different issues with win7 installs.
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