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Wireless Router vs Wireless Access Point

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April 10, 2004 11:31:09 AM

Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

What is the functional difference between a wireless router and a
wireless access point? When/why would you choose an access point over
a router?
Anonymous
a b F Wireless
April 10, 2004 7:18:19 PM

Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

Hi Dick;

A wireless router is basically a router and access point all in one.
You would buy an access point if you had an existing network and wanted to
add wireless capability. You would plug the access point into an existing
router, hub or switch.
Going back as this stuff was emerging there was a price advantage to just
buying an access point. But as things progressed wireless routers sold in
greater numbers and the prices became more competitive. To the point that
now in many instances a wireless router will cost you less than an access
point.
There is very little reason any longer to buy an access point as most
wireless routers now can function as an access point.
HTH;
TomA
"Dick" <LeadWinger> wrote in message
news:251g70t41gg6ejbrb8fjno2rhg6obkm923@4ax.com...
> What is the functional difference between a wireless router and a
> wireless access point? When/why would you choose an access point over
> a router?
April 10, 2004 7:18:20 PM

Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

Thanks Tom. I have a connection problem with a wireless "g" adapter
trying to communicate with a "b" network. I am at the point that I
want to buy either a WAP or a wireless router.

With your explanation, it sounds like I might as well get a router.
Considering the D-Link DI-624. I have tried everything I can think of
(read many articles) about getting a network connection. Nothing
works. I get the little network icon on the taskbar, and it says I
have one or more networks I can choose from. When I open it, I see
the network icon (looks like a chess pawn), but there is nothing next
to it. When I go into control panel/network, and enter the SSID and
WEP encryption key, it appears in the bottom box, but I can't get it
to take the 128 bit WEP. It keeps reverting back to the 64 bit key.
And it won't connect with the router. I have about run out of ideas.
It should be noted that the existing "b" network has been running for
several months without a problem. It's just that the new "g" adapter
won't connect to it. If you have any ideas I would love to hear them.
I'm about ready to order the "g" router and start over. The existing
"b" router is a combo cable modem and wireless router. I can turn off
the wireless, and set it to bridge the output so it is just a plain
cable modem.

Dick

On Sat, 10 Apr 2004 15:18:19 GMT, "Tom A"
<jetski2@optonline.net.NOSPAM> wrote:

>Hi Dick;
>
>A wireless router is basically a router and access point all in one.
>You would buy an access point if you had an existing network and wanted to
>add wireless capability. You would plug the access point into an existing
>router, hub or switch.
>Going back as this stuff was emerging there was a price advantage to just
>buying an access point. But as things progressed wireless routers sold in
>greater numbers and the prices became more competitive. To the point that
>now in many instances a wireless router will cost you less than an access
>point.
>There is very little reason any longer to buy an access point as most
>wireless routers now can function as an access point.
>HTH;
>TomA
>"Dick" <LeadWinger> wrote in message
>news:251g70t41gg6ejbrb8fjno2rhg6obkm923@4ax.com...
>> What is the functional difference between a wireless router and a
>> wireless access point? When/why would you choose an access point over
>> a router?
>
Related resources
Anonymous
a b F Wireless
April 10, 2004 7:48:35 PM

Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

Dick <LeadWinger> wrote in news:251g70t41gg6ejbrb8fjno2rhg6obkm923@
4ax.com:

> What is the functional difference between a wireless router and a
> wireless access point? When/why would you choose an access point over
> a router?
>

http://www.homenethelp.com/web/explain/about-NAT.asp

That's what a wire/wireless router does that WAP cannot do. I think most
wireless routers are AP's as well.

http://www.homenethelp.com/web/explain/about-wireless80...

If you want to go wireless and have a wired router, then you plug a WAP
into the router.

Duane :) 
Anonymous
a b F Wireless
April 10, 2004 8:09:47 PM

Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

Thinking beyond your house or SOHO, but think in a larger office / corporate
office / conference center / existing network ... if you want wireless on an
existing network, in various locations, you would install access points
throughout the environment in order to extend the network.

Aside from having a different router, a different 16 port 10/100 switch and
a different access point - which all allow me to physically place each piece
of equipment wherever I want it - I also have a pair of access points set up
as a point to point bridge - so I can get two buildings connected via
wireless.


"Tom A" <jetski2@optonline.net.NOSPAM> wrote in message
news:%eUdc.14666$Eg.2944720@news4.srv.hcvlny.cv.net...
> Hi Dick;
>
> A wireless router is basically a router and access point all in one.
> You would buy an access point if you had an existing network and wanted to
> add wireless capability. You would plug the access point into an existing
> router, hub or switch.
> Going back as this stuff was emerging there was a price advantage to just
> buying an access point. But as things progressed wireless routers sold in
> greater numbers and the prices became more competitive. To the point that
> now in many instances a wireless router will cost you less than an access
> point.
> There is very little reason any longer to buy an access point as most
> wireless routers now can function as an access point.
> HTH;
> TomA
> "Dick" <LeadWinger> wrote in message
> news:251g70t41gg6ejbrb8fjno2rhg6obkm923@4ax.com...
> > What is the functional difference between a wireless router and a
> > wireless access point? When/why would you choose an access point over
> > a router?
>
>
December 28, 2011 9:32:29 AM


Hi, may I ask you a question: Can you plug a WAP (wireless access point) into another WAP? And thereby extend the range even further.
---- Eddie

Quote:
Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

Hi Dick;

A wireless router is basically a router and access point all in one.
You would buy an access point if you had an existing network and wanted to
add wireless capability. You would plug the access point into an existing
router, hub or switch.
Going back as this stuff was emerging there was a price advantage to just
buying an access point. But as things progressed wireless routers sold in
greater numbers and the prices became more competitive. To the point that
now in many instances a wireless router will cost you less than an access
point.
There is very little reason any longer to buy an access point as most
wireless routers now can function as an access point.
HTH;
TomA
"Dick" <LeadWinger> wrote in message
news:251g70t41gg6ejbrb8fjno2rhg6obkm923@4ax.com...
> What is the functional difference between a wireless router and a
> wireless access point? When/why would you choose an access point over
> a router?

January 11, 2013 4:41:01 AM

Nitupsar said:
Hi, may I ask you a question: Can you plug a WAP (wireless access point) into another WAP? And thereby extend the range even further.
---- Eddie



Yes u can connect one wap with another giving both of the the same SSID number
January 16, 2013 8:27:33 AM

Nitupsar: I think what you're referring to are wireless repeaters, which extend the range of an existing wireless network. Those keep the same SSID as kvdshrm said, though chaining repeaters together is probably a bad idea (though it is possible). This is because wireless repeaters halve the throughput of a wireless network.

January 17, 2013 4:40:57 AM

jamesshelton said:
Nitupsar: I think what you're referring to are wireless repeaters, which extend the range of an existing wireless network. Those keep the same SSID as kvdshrm said, though chaining repeaters together is probably a bad idea (though it is possible). This is because wireless repeaters halve the throughput of a wireless network.



Dear James,

Can you enlighten me with other approaches that can be used to bridge repeaters without keeping the same SSID?

thanks in advace
kvdshrm
January 17, 2013 5:16:23 AM

kvdshrm said:
Dear James,

Can you enlighten me with other approaches that can be used to bridge repeaters without keeping the same SSID?

thanks in advace
kvdshrm


I think the way to do that would be to use a bridge to pick up the original signal, connect the bridge to an access point via Ethernet cable, and enable the access point on a different SSID. Essentially, Wireless Signal 1 is bridged into a wired network by the bridge and then that new wired network is made wireless-accessible by adding an access point to it.

Optimally through you would just run an Ethernet cable directly from the main router to the access point.
!