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Dell 4700 or eMachines T5026

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  • eMachines
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March 13, 2005 6:49:48 PM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

Trying to decide between these two machines. At a
stalemate

Here is link for eMachines model

http://tinyurl.com/5wbq9

What you all think? Which one would YOU buy and why?

Intended usage would be to put a Hauppauge TV card in
it and use it as a PVR and TV.

Would also use it for surfing net, Quicken, term
papers,etc

Advice?

More about : dell 4700 emachines t5026

Anonymous
March 14, 2005 3:00:36 AM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

I've never been impressed by the quality of materials in the eMachines boxes.
People complain about Dell support on this newsgroup, but the Dell web site is
excellent for its organization of materials and information... Ben Myers

On Sun, 13 Mar 2005 15:49:48 -0600, me@privacy.net wrote:

>Trying to decide between these two machines. At a
>stalemate
>
>Here is link for eMachines model
>
>http://tinyurl.com/5wbq9
>
>What you all think? Which one would YOU buy and why?
>
>Intended usage would be to put a Hauppauge TV card in
>it and use it as a PVR and TV.
>
>Would also use it for surfing net, Quicken, term
>papers,etc
>
>Advice?
March 14, 2005 3:00:37 AM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

>I've never been impressed by the quality of materials in the eMachines boxes.
>People complain about Dell support on this newsgroup, but the Dell web site is
>excellent for its organization of materials and information... Ben Myers

Yes...... that is one thing that is making me lean
towards staying with Dell vs eMachines.... and that is
THIS news group. Yes this news group

There does not exist a usenet group for eMachines. And
Ive always found peer to peer support better than
factory support anyway.... i.e. actual users sharing
tips and tricks of their machines

Still tho..... that $600 eMachine has some very good
specs for THAT price range
Related resources
Anonymous
March 14, 2005 3:01:15 AM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

<me@privacy.net> wrote in message
news:n6d93110gmg3bd5mlselg205lh9a1jgclp@4ax.com...
> Trying to decide between these two machines. At a
> stalemate
>
> Here is link for eMachines model
>
> http://tinyurl.com/5wbq9
>
> What you all think? Which one would YOU buy and why?
>
> Intended usage would be to put a Hauppauge TV card in
> it and use it as a PVR and TV.
>
> Would also use it for surfing net, Quicken, term
> papers,etc
>
> Advice?

I'm using a Dell PC, and we use them at the office, so I've built up some
brand loyalty. The Dells have always been nicely engineered, the components
have been solid, and they've been quiet and reliable. So, all things being
approximately equal, I tilt towards Dell. That's my report, and I think most
Dell customers would agree. (Maybe I should add that, since we're
technically savvy, it's rare for us to talk to tech support, so we have no
basis to comment about support centers in India. Personally I think tech
support is always a struggle, whether it's based at home or abroad.)
March 14, 2005 3:01:16 AM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

>Personally I think tech
>support is always a struggle, whether it's based at home or abroad.)

Agree 100 percent
March 14, 2005 3:01:16 AM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

>I'm using a Dell PC, and we use them at the office, so I've built up some
>brand loyalty. The Dells have always been nicely engineered, the components
>have been solid, and they've been quiet and reliable

Dumb question.... and off topic.... but if one wanted
to buy some computers to open up a "Internet cafe" in
their hometown..... would you go with the Dell
Optiplexes since they are designed for networks that
are centrally managed?
Anonymous
March 14, 2005 3:01:17 AM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

me@privacy.net wrote:
>> I'm using a Dell PC, and we use them at the office, so I've built up
>> some brand loyalty. The Dells have always been nicely engineered,
>> the components have been solid, and they've been quiet and reliable
>
> Dumb question.... and off topic.... but if one wanted
> to buy some computers to open up a "Internet cafe" in
> their hometown..... would you go with the Dell
> Optiplexes since they are designed for networks that
> are centrally managed?

Actually we are looking at those for the same kind of project. Cheap can
handle what the expected clientel will need and easy to network. Actually
they are almost perfect for it.

--

Joe Cilinceon
Anonymous
March 14, 2005 5:44:34 AM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

I monitor the Dell, Gateway, Compaq, and HP newsgroups, because I have hands on
servicing all of them. The Gateway newsgroup is very quiet by comparision with
this one, with very few postings about eMachines boxes. Having a newsgroup to
rely on either when you are fed the party line of BS or when you encounter
know-nothings at manufacturer's tech support is priceless, to use an ad
catchphrase... Ben Myers

On Sun, 13 Mar 2005 19:06:19 -0600, me@privacy.net wrote:

>>I've never been impressed by the quality of materials in the eMachines boxes.
>>People complain about Dell support on this newsgroup, but the Dell web site is
>>excellent for its organization of materials and information... Ben Myers
>
>Yes...... that is one thing that is making me lean
>towards staying with Dell vs eMachines.... and that is
>THIS news group. Yes this news group
>
>There does not exist a usenet group for eMachines. And
>Ive always found peer to peer support better than
>factory support anyway.... i.e. actual users sharing
>tips and tricks of their machines
>
>Still tho..... that $600 eMachine has some very good
>specs for THAT price range
Anonymous
March 14, 2005 5:44:34 AM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

Essentially any computer running Win 2000 or Win XP Pro can be centrally managed
and reside on a network domain. Windows XP Home computers do not lend
themselves to central management.

If you want to do something for cheap, look at the Dell Outlet on the Dell web
site. If you catch it at the right time, some of the prices are stunning.

.... Ben Myers

On Sun, 13 Mar 2005 19:09:41 -0600, me@privacy.net wrote:

>>I'm using a Dell PC, and we use them at the office, so I've built up some
>>brand loyalty. The Dells have always been nicely engineered, the components
>>have been solid, and they've been quiet and reliable
>
>Dumb question.... and off topic.... but if one wanted
>to buy some computers to open up a "Internet cafe" in
>their hometown..... would you go with the Dell
>Optiplexes since they are designed for networks that
>are centrally managed?
Anonymous
March 14, 2005 5:52:02 AM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

depends on the number of machines that you are talking about.
if you are about to venture into something like the easyeverything cafe in
times square with 800 stations then go optiplex for a machine that is
thoroughly tested and certified with major software brands and for the
extended product life cycle (so the first machine you receive is identical
to the last). for small operations, even up to 30 machine there is not much
incentive to go with optiplex... but there is a huge incentive to get
identical or near identical hardware so that you can 'clone' or 'ghost' a
new drive image (of software) that you barrow from another machine as these
machines will inevitably need to be refreshed from time to time (even if you
lock them down as 'limited' users they can still get virus' and the
like...).



<me@privacy.net> wrote in message
news:7to931lbr8qn0mis2t5ock1o046gf3hlgn@4ax.com...
> >I'm using a Dell PC, and we use them at the office, so I've built up some
>>brand loyalty. The Dells have always been nicely engineered, the
>>components
>>have been solid, and they've been quiet and reliable
>
> Dumb question.... and off topic.... but if one wanted
> to buy some computers to open up a "Internet cafe" in
> their hometown..... would you go with the Dell
> Optiplexes since they are designed for networks that
> are centrally managed?
March 14, 2005 11:36:46 AM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

> Having a newsgroup to
>rely on either when you are fed the party line of BS or when you encounter
>know-nothings at manufacturer's tech support is priceless,

Yes... news groups are VERY handy!
March 14, 2005 11:38:42 AM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

>Actually we are looking at those for the same kind of project. Cheap can
>handle what the expected clientel will need and easy to network. Actually
>they are almost perfect for it.

I see

My other thoughts on this Internet Cafe thing was to
use thin clients and a server. In other words to have
all apps on the server.... and to use them via the thin
clients

What abt THAT idea vs centrally managed system?
March 14, 2005 11:41:07 AM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

> but there is a huge incentive to get
>identical or near identical hardware so that you can 'clone' or 'ghost' a
>new drive image (of software) that you barrow from another machine as these
>machines will inevitably need to be refreshed from time to time (even if you
>lock them down as 'limited' users they can still get virus' and the
>like...).

Agree....

But what abt a massive server and a thin client setup
vs centrally managed PCs?

Might that make more sense in an Internet cafe since
all apps will reside on the central server and one
accesses them via thin clients?
March 14, 2005 11:43:17 AM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

>I'd seriously look at thin clients. Having any kind or *real* pc in the
>hands of those folks can be a significant security exposure.

Sorry Hank.... didn't get to your suggestion above till
last..... after id posted questions abt thin client
system

So....you think thin client is THE "way" to do an
Internet Cafe?

Right now all I need is a new PC for myself..... but Im
kicking around opening an internet cafe in my small
town. Hence the dual questions.
Anonymous
March 14, 2005 11:59:50 AM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

<me@privacy.net> wrote in message
news:ek8b319n7tqdr8nm4glhtft7c8hdmact7u@4ax.com...
> >I'd seriously look at thin clients. Having any kind or *real* pc in the
>>hands of those folks can be a significant security exposure.
>
> Sorry Hank.... didn't get to your suggestion above till
> last..... after id posted questions abt thin client
> system
>
> So....you think thin client is THE "way" to do an
> Internet Cafe?
>
> Right now all I need is a new PC for myself..... but Im
> kicking around opening an internet cafe in my small
> town. Hence the dual questions.


Random thoughts....

As an ideal solution, thin clients might be the way to go to minimize
end-user problems. What I am wondering, however, is how cost-effective
those would be versus an entry level (let's say) Dimension 3000 that has
most all input devices disabled and the BIOS locked, and how that might
relate to server costs and demands for central activity. ? In other words,
would the demands on the server be far less by using PC's (thereby requiring
less cost for any server itself) as well as the TC versus PC costs.

It's been years since I've even glances at TC prices, so I confess I don't
know. But that might be another consideration.


Stew
Anonymous
March 14, 2005 5:40:42 PM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

Whether or not to use thin clients depends on your target market, and the
perceived needs of the market. If you want offer internet access, plain and
simple, thin clients will do the job and minimize the risks of contracting
viruses, worms and malware. Going a bit beyond internet access to offer access
to a suite like Micro$oft Office is still doable with thin clients. Beyond
basic internet+office, thin clients tend to be woefully inadequate. I support
clients who use thin clients in one way or another. Forget PhotoShop, gaming,
and several other species of software which are either compute-intensive or
graphics-intensive... Ben Myers

On Mon, 14 Mar 2005 08:38:42 -0600, me@privacy.net wrote:

>>Actually we are looking at those for the same kind of project. Cheap can
>>handle what the expected clientel will need and easy to network. Actually
>>they are almost perfect for it.
>
>I see
>
>My other thoughts on this Internet Cafe thing was to
>use thin clients and a server. In other words to have
>all apps on the server.... and to use them via the thin
>clients
>
>What abt THAT idea vs centrally managed system?
March 14, 2005 5:40:43 PM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

> Beyond
>basic internet+office, thin clients tend to be woefully inadequate. I support
>clients who use thin clients in one way or another. Forget PhotoShop, gaming,
>and several other species of software which are either compute-intensive or
>graphics-intensive... Ben Myers

I see

Thanks for that info.

But Im curious how they are woefully inadequate for
other purposes?
March 14, 2005 5:40:43 PM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

>Beyond
>basic internet+office, thin clients tend to be woefully inadequate. I support
>clients who use thin clients in one way or another. Forget PhotoShop, gaming,
>and several other species of software which are either compute-intensive or
>graphics-intensive... Ben Myers

On thing that I thought abt AGAINST thin clients is
that if the "cafe" idea does not work and I have to
sell the equip..... that maybe Id have an easier time
selling true desktop PCs vs thin clients?

Yes? No?
Anonymous
March 14, 2005 6:47:22 PM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

Stew,

You're right. The price of a new thin client is right up there with that of a
Dimension 3000. Used thin clients of various types are pretty inexpensive on
eBay, but to buy and deploy them, one needs to know what they will and what they
will not do. In comparsion, a Dimension 3000 or similar box needs to be locked
down as best as possible to keep it from getting totally hosed up by the
security holes in Windows and the malicious or naive uses by patrons of the
cafe. For this, I would have identical hardware setups and keep a spare hard
drive or two around imaged and to install when the inevitably trashed hard drive
occurs... Ben Myers

On Mon, 14 Mar 2005 08:59:50 -0600, "S.Lewis" <stew1960@cover.bellsouth.net>
wrote:

>
><me@privacy.net> wrote in message
>news:ek8b319n7tqdr8nm4glhtft7c8hdmact7u@4ax.com...
>> >I'd seriously look at thin clients. Having any kind or *real* pc in the
>>>hands of those folks can be a significant security exposure.
>>
>> Sorry Hank.... didn't get to your suggestion above till
>> last..... after id posted questions abt thin client
>> system
>>
>> So....you think thin client is THE "way" to do an
>> Internet Cafe?
>>
>> Right now all I need is a new PC for myself..... but Im
>> kicking around opening an internet cafe in my small
>> town. Hence the dual questions.
>
>
>Random thoughts....
>
>As an ideal solution, thin clients might be the way to go to minimize
>end-user problems. What I am wondering, however, is how cost-effective
>those would be versus an entry level (let's say) Dimension 3000 that has
>most all input devices disabled and the BIOS locked, and how that might
>relate to server costs and demands for central activity. ? In other words,
>would the demands on the server be far less by using PC's (thereby requiring
>less cost for any server itself) as well as the TC versus PC costs.
>
>It's been years since I've even glances at TC prices, so I confess I don't
>know. But that might be another consideration.
>
>
>Stew
>
>
Anonymous
March 14, 2005 7:11:39 PM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

and application server type arrangement it is only economical when
implemented in large scale. it has a large initial cost for a high end
server capable of supporting multiple virtual sessions and for software and
the cost of client machines remain effectively the same. an application
server does centralize management but also puts all of your eggs in one
basket so to speak. i don't see it as helpful for an internet cafe. i see
it as extremely valuable for a mobile workforce that wants to connect to
their 'desktop' from various locations (in and out of the 'office') or a
flexible office arrangement where people do not have assigned desks but want
to pull up their previous session at whatever desk they may be assigned for
the day.

<me@privacy.net> wrote in message
news:vg8b31h47i8makrlbpferuk3u0ht7sv2pq@4ax.com...
>> but there is a huge incentive to get
>>identical or near identical hardware so that you can 'clone' or 'ghost' a
>>new drive image (of software) that you barrow from another machine as
>>these
>>machines will inevitably need to be refreshed from time to time (even if
>>you
>>lock them down as 'limited' users they can still get virus' and the
>>like...).
>
> Agree....
>
> But what abt a massive server and a thin client setup
> vs centrally managed PCs?
>
> Might that make more sense in an Internet cafe since
> all apps will reside on the central server and one
> accesses them via thin clients?
Anonymous
March 14, 2005 7:22:14 PM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

good point about gamming. i have heard that local area network gamming is
one of the hottest tickets for these internet cafes.

<ben_myers_spam_me_not @ charter.net (Ben Myers)> wrote in message
news:4235a15d.2302870@nntp.charter.net...
> Whether or not to use thin clients depends on your target market, and the
> perceived needs of the market. If you want offer internet access, plain
> and
> simple, thin clients will do the job and minimize the risks of contracting
> viruses, worms and malware. Going a bit beyond internet access to offer
> access
> to a suite like Micro$oft Office is still doable with thin clients.
> Beyond
> basic internet+office, thin clients tend to be woefully inadequate. I
> support
> clients who use thin clients in one way or another. Forget PhotoShop,
> gaming,
> and several other species of software which are either compute-intensive
> or
> graphics-intensive... Ben Myers
>
> On Mon, 14 Mar 2005 08:38:42 -0600, me@privacy.net wrote:
>
>>>Actually we are looking at those for the same kind of project. Cheap can
>>>handle what the expected clientel will need and easy to network. Actually
>>>they are almost perfect for it.
>>
>>I see
>>
>>My other thoughts on this Internet Cafe thing was to
>>use thin clients and a server. In other words to have
>>all apps on the server.... and to use them via the thin
>>clients
>>
>>What abt THAT idea vs centrally managed system?
>
Anonymous
March 14, 2005 7:58:07 PM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

there is nothing really wrong with the emachines computer itself, and it may
be extremely important to the buyer to be able to take it home with them
from their local bestbuy store (or the like), but it is not in my opinion a
particular great value in terms of bang for the buck and it is has some
pretty undesirable warranty procedures.

the emachines comes with a one year warranty that can be extended to two or
three years. the warranty procedure involves paying $20 to initiate a
conversation with their technical support team. this fee is waived if the
machine is under warranty and they determine that the machine is defective.
i don't have much experience with this so can't tell you how aggressive they
enforce this fee... for instance, if you get a virus/spyware/whatever and
call them and they tell you to reload the operating system do they waive the
fee or do they determine that the machine is not defective and so you pay
for their advice? if they determine that there is a hardware problem then
you have to ship computer to them for repair (unlike dell that will ship
spare parts for you to replace yourself or dispatch a service person to
replace the part if you have an in home warranty).

that emachines t5026 is similar to a dimension 3000.
the $599 emachines is purchased locally so sales tax will most certainly be
collected as well.
it has the same chip set as found in the dimension 4700 but the 4700 can
have a 'real' (non integrated) video card added to it (it seems that the
emachines does not have the pciexpress slot for upgrading the video, the
documentation online is incomplete). all other things being equal i was
able to price a 4700 for about $775 that comes with a 15" lcd, 1 year in
home warranty, and a processor with 800Mhz fsb instead of the 533mhz fsb of
the emachines (free shipping and no sales tax collected to most states).
if you watch dell closely you can get better deals that this and purchase
without a monitor too. but of course you will typically have to wait a week
to ten days for a dell to arrive and you can take an emachines computer home
today. good luck.
it come with




<me@privacy.net> wrote in message
news:n6d93110gmg3bd5mlselg205lh9a1jgclp@4ax.com...
> Trying to decide between these two machines. At a
> stalemate
>
> Here is link for eMachines model
>
> http://tinyurl.com/5wbq9
>
> What you all think? Which one would YOU buy and why?
>
> Intended usage would be to put a Hauppauge TV card in
> it and use it as a PVR and TV.
>
> Would also use it for surfing net, Quicken, term
> papers,etc
>
> Advice?
March 14, 2005 7:58:08 PM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

>all other things being equal i was
>able to price a 4700 for about $775 that comes with a 15" lcd, 1 year in
>home warranty, and a processor with 800Mhz fsb instead of the 533mhz fsb of
>the emachines

OK

You guys have convinced me to stay with Dell. If
nothing else because of this great discussion we are
having on this usenet group!! Again.... I can find
no eMachine usenet group at all...and I HATE web based
forums!

Thanks all

Still tho... now Ive got to decide WHICH Dell to go
with if Im really serious abt this Internet Cafe thing.
Seems like Optiplexes might be best if NOT doing the
thin client route, huh?
Anonymous
March 14, 2005 8:05:21 PM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

"that emachines t5026 is similar to a dimension 3000."
should read...
the emachines t5026 is similar to a dimension 3000 in that it appears to
lack a slot for the installation of a pciexpress video card but it has the
same chipset as the dimension 4700 which enjoys slightly better integrated
graphics performance than the 3000 and the possibility of faster 'dual
channel' memory support. the 4700 does have a pciexpress video card slot
for future expansion and this feature is the bigest distinction between the
3000 and the 4700.

"Christopher Muto" <muto@worldnet.att.net> wrote in message
news:zojZd.2423$qN3.1191@trndny01...
> there is nothing really wrong with the emachines computer itself, and it
> may be extremely important to the buyer to be able to take it home with
> them from their local bestbuy store (or the like), but it is not in my
> opinion a particular great value in terms of bang for the buck and it is
> has some pretty undesirable warranty procedures.
>
> the emachines comes with a one year warranty that can be extended to two
> or three years. the warranty procedure involves paying $20 to initiate a
> conversation with their technical support team. this fee is waived if the
> machine is under warranty and they determine that the machine is
> defective. i don't have much experience with this so can't tell you how
> aggressive they enforce this fee... for instance, if you get a
> virus/spyware/whatever and call them and they tell you to reload the
> operating system do they waive the fee or do they determine that the
> machine is not defective and so you pay for their advice? if they
> determine that there is a hardware problem then you have to ship computer
> to them for repair (unlike dell that will ship spare parts for you to
> replace yourself or dispatch a service person to replace the part if you
> have an in home warranty).
>
> that emachines t5026 is similar to a dimension 3000.
> the $599 emachines is purchased locally so sales tax will most certainly
> be collected as well.
> it has the same chip set as found in the dimension 4700 but the 4700 can
> have a 'real' (non integrated) video card added to it (it seems that the
> emachines does not have the pciexpress slot for upgrading the video, the
> documentation online is incomplete). all other things being equal i was
> able to price a 4700 for about $775 that comes with a 15" lcd, 1 year in
> home warranty, and a processor with 800Mhz fsb instead of the 533mhz fsb
> of the emachines (free shipping and no sales tax collected to most
> states). if you watch dell closely you can get better deals that this and
> purchase without a monitor too. but of course you will typically have to
> wait a week to ten days for a dell to arrive and you can take an emachines
> computer home today. good luck.
> it come with
>
>
>
>
> <me@privacy.net> wrote in message
> news:n6d93110gmg3bd5mlselg205lh9a1jgclp@4ax.com...
>> Trying to decide between these two machines. At a
>> stalemate
>>
>> Here is link for eMachines model
>>
>> http://tinyurl.com/5wbq9
>>
>> What you all think? Which one would YOU buy and why?
>>
>> Intended usage would be to put a Hauppauge TV card in
>> it and use it as a PVR and TV.
>>
>> Would also use it for surfing net, Quicken, term
>> papers,etc
>>
>> Advice?
>
>
Anonymous
March 14, 2005 11:05:58 PM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

why not start a new thread about this internet cafe thing. you tacked your
question on to someone else's question and given proper etiquette none of us
should have even replied... spell out exactly what you are trying to do, how
many machines, what sort of environment (personal/friendly or automated),
how you intend to bill people (per hour or time purchased up front with
usernames and passwords)... in europe there are an endless amount of
internet cafes that have a half dozen machines and just bill per hour based
on your start and finish time from the clock on the wall... in new york
city there is the easyeverything cafe that is open 24 hours a day and has
over 800 terminals... just an example of two very different models.

<me@privacy.net> wrote in message
news:D gpb31ppcj4isasi1g1ip6apq0p3r4gu58@4ax.com...
> >all other things being equal i was
>>able to price a 4700 for about $775 that comes with a 15" lcd, 1 year in
>>home warranty, and a processor with 800Mhz fsb instead of the 533mhz fsb
>>of
>>the emachines
>
> OK
>
> You guys have convinced me to stay with Dell. If
> nothing else because of this great discussion we are
> having on this usenet group!! Again.... I can find
> no eMachine usenet group at all...and I HATE web based
> forums!
>
> Thanks all
>
> Still tho... now Ive got to decide WHICH Dell to go
> with if Im really serious abt this Internet Cafe thing.
> Seems like Optiplexes might be best if NOT doing the
> thin client route, huh?
Anonymous
March 14, 2005 11:07:57 PM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

<ben_myers_spam_me_not @ charter.net (Ben Myers)> wrote in message
news:4235b01b.6077252@nntp.charter.net...
> Stew,
>
> You're right. The price of a new thin client is right up there with that
> of a
> Dimension 3000. Used thin clients of various types are pretty
> inexpensive on
> eBay, but to buy and deploy them, one needs to know what they will and
> what they
> will not do. In comparsion, a Dimension 3000 or similar box needs to be
> locked
> down as best as possible to keep it from getting totally hosed up by the
> security holes in Windows and the malicious or naive uses by patrons of
> the
> cafe. For this, I would have identical hardware setups and keep a spare
> hard
> drive or two around imaged and to install when the inevitably trashed hard
> drive
> occurs... Ben Myers
>


Sounds like a plan to me at $299 to $499 each ( the latter if one puts an
LCD with it). :-)


Stew
Anonymous
March 14, 2005 11:47:38 PM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

All the previously mentioned types of software are very intensive in their use
of the graphics subsystem. Even with gigabit Ethernet, having all the bits
flowing across an Ethernet to the thin client seems like 56K dialup again
compared to having a graphics adapter right there in the system.

Likewise, Dimension 3000s may not be too good for gaiming compared to a computer
with 8xAGP or PCI-Express graphics.

Thin clients are hard to resell, which is why there are so many up for auction
on eBay... Ben Myers

On Mon, 14 Mar 2005 13:21:41 -0600, me@privacy.net wrote:

>> Beyond
>>basic internet+office, thin clients tend to be woefully inadequate. I support
>>clients who use thin clients in one way or another. Forget PhotoShop, gaming,
>>and several other species of software which are either compute-intensive or
>>graphics-intensive... Ben Myers
>
>I see
>
>Thanks for that info.
>
>But Im curious how they are woefully inadequate for
>other purposes?
March 15, 2005 4:16:40 PM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

>Thin clients are hard to resell, which is why there are so many up for auction
>on eBay... Ben Myers

Thanks Ben.... you've been a BIG help!!

I will stick with centrally managed system such as
Optiplex
March 15, 2005 4:20:50 PM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

>It's not *the* way. It's *one* way. I agree with the others in that you
>first have to decide what will be done on systems in the cafe. The more
>applications and horsepower, the less a thin client appeals. Also, if you do
>want to sell the units later, certainly regular PC's ("fat clients") will
>sell easier.....

usage will be only web surfing and web based email
Anonymous
March 16, 2005 2:39:50 AM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

me@privacy.net wrote:
>>It's not *the* way. It's *one* way. I agree with the others in that you
>>first have to decide what will be done on systems in the cafe. The more
>>applications and horsepower, the less a thin client appeals. Also, if you do
>>want to sell the units later, certainly regular PC's ("fat clients") will
>>sell easier.....
>
>
> usage will be only web surfing and web based email

If those are your only two purposes, Linux may be worth looking into.
It's fairly simple to setup Gnome or KDE in such a way that even the
most computer illiterate person can use it. You won't need to lose any
sleep over either spyware or viruses and your software costs will be
down dramatically.
Anonymous
March 16, 2005 5:22:59 AM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

Good point. OpenOffice, Firefox (or Mozilla), GIMP, etc. on Linux make for a
very inexpensive and effective computing environment as long as people are not
completely anal about compatibility with Microsoft Office formats and Word/Excel
Basic macros and all the other lock-in features... Ben Myers.

On Tue, 15 Mar 2005 23:39:50 GMT, Nicholas Andrade <sdnick484@nospam.yahoo.com>
wrote:

>me@privacy.net wrote:
>>>It's not *the* way. It's *one* way. I agree with the others in that you
>>>first have to decide what will be done on systems in the cafe. The more
>>>applications and horsepower, the less a thin client appeals. Also, if you do
>>>want to sell the units later, certainly regular PC's ("fat clients") will
>>>sell easier.....
>>
>>
>> usage will be only web surfing and web based email
>
>If those are your only two purposes, Linux may be worth looking into.
>It's fairly simple to setup Gnome or KDE in such a way that even the
>most computer illiterate person can use it. You won't need to lose any
>sleep over either spyware or viruses and your software costs will be
>down dramatically.
Anonymous
March 16, 2005 5:52:31 AM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

Ben Myers wrote:
> Good point. OpenOffice, Firefox (or Mozilla), GIMP, etc. on Linux make for a
> very inexpensive and effective computing environment as long as people are not
> completely anal about compatibility with Microsoft Office formats and Word/Excel
> Basic macros and all the other lock-in features... Ben Myers.
>
Not to mention you can use CrossOver Office if you need a machine with
true MS Office. Furthermore, if you need to lock down user permissions,
I'd go *NIX any day of the week over MS. Actually one good environment
for the internet cafe is Sun Java Desktop; it's build on Gnome, has an
Windows feel, and a very good interface to lockdown users (their target
was corporate desktops). With very little tweaking you'd have a system
safe from everything except 0-day exploits (and updating all your
programs at once to the latest version can be done in one command in Linux).
March 16, 2005 4:59:57 PM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

>> usage will be only web surfing and web based email
>
>If those are your only two purposes, Linux may be worth looking into.

Not disagreeing with you on Linux.... but I still need
to buy hardware. Hence my questions abt Optiplexes
!