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Cpu temperature 86 degrees celsius

Last response: in Laptops & Notebooks
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September 11, 2012 4:33:48 PM

Hi, i bought an high performance laptop to be used for everything. Hd video editing, Cinema 4d, video games etc...
It's an Asus N76VZ with an Intel i7 3610qm at 2.3 GHz, 8gb of ram and a nvidia gtx 650m.

When i do renders for cinema 4d, the ones that can take from 30 minutes to 20 hours, the cpu runs at 100% and reaches 86 degrees celsius. Is this going to reduce cpu life earlier than normal? Or is everything under control?

Thanks
a c 169 à CPUs
a b D Laptop
September 11, 2012 4:52:59 PM

strelokstk said:
Hi, i bought an high performance laptop to be used for everything. Hd video editing, Cinema 4d, video games etc...
It's an Asus N76VZ with an Intel i7 3610qm at 2.3 GHz, 8gb of ram and a nvidia gtx 650m.

When i do renders for cinema 4d, the ones that can take from 30 minutes to 20 hours, the cpu runs at 100% and reaches 86 degrees celsius. Is this going to reduce cpu life earlier than normal? Or is everything under control?

Thanks


86 centigrade is still within acceptable limits on Intel CPUs. It's high and you definitely don't want it running at that temperature 24/7 but for a short period it is okay.

Laptops are not meant for lengthy and complex workloads such as 20+ hour render jobs, there are workstations for that.
September 11, 2012 9:29:27 PM

Ok thanks! Maybe i should consider buying a laptop cooler?
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a c 169 à CPUs
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September 11, 2012 9:37:11 PM

strelokstk said:
Ok thanks! Maybe i should consider buying a laptop cooler?


In your particular use case I'd say that might not be a bad idea
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September 11, 2012 9:53:43 PM

Generally Laptop coolers are not very eff, they try to cool the "bottom" when what you need is a higher volume of air going into the vents.

And 86 is much to close to max temperature for Long period of time and you want the laptop to last.
Not sure about IB, but SB CPUs the max temp is about 95C at which point the cpu will cut back it's speed to reduce temp (throttling).

As Others pointed out 2+ hours rendering/encoding is more for a desktop.
September 11, 2012 10:06:10 PM

i think ur problem is that u have a laptop.
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September 11, 2012 10:07:24 PM

RetiredChief said:
Generally Laptop coolers are not very eff, they try to cool the "bottom" when what you need is a higher volume of air going into the vents.

And 86 is much to close to max temperature for Long period of time and you want the laptop to last.
Not sure about IB, but SB CPUs the max temp is about 95C at which point the cpu will cut back it's speed to reduce temp (throttling).

As Others pointed out 2+ hours rendering/encoding is more for a desktop.


Tjunction as per Intel for their mobile CPUs are higher than desktop CPUs, and manufacturers typically run their CPUs right up to thermal spec.

For Sandy Bridge m-series, this is 100 degrees celsius, Ivy Bridge, it is 105 degrees celsius.

As per Anandtech observations and I concur, the vast majority of laptops out there with Sandy/Ivy Bridge CPUs run very hot, 90 degrees celsius hot. Few (MBP retina for example) run around 75 degrees celsius. The throttling mechanism kicks in already around 75 degrees celsius, but only by reducing the turbo bins. On some new Dell XPS models, the throttling is so bad that the CPU is operating below normal frequencies when loaded.

Anyway, not much damage is expected, but you sure aren't getting your money's worth in speed for what you paid for, because the manufacturer skimped on cooling.
September 12, 2012 5:17:24 PM

the problem is that I can't afford a workstation.
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September 12, 2012 6:23:02 PM

strelokstk said:
the problem is that I can't afford a workstation.


I have done hundreds if not thousands of hours of simulation workload on my laptop with a Sandy Bridge CPU. It taxes one core heavily and the temperatures hover around 80 degrees cesius. I did the same on my last C2D based laptop, which ran cooler. Both had no issues. Granted, the cooling system on my laptop isn't as bad as the one on the new Dell XPS, but with both cores taxed, my CPU goes up to 90+ degrees.

There are ways you can try to lower the temperature, for example, if you are handy, you can reapply the heatsink compound on the CPU die-heatsink interface. Using something with a very high thermal conductivity usually lowers the temperature by a few degrees.

Try the laptop cooler idea, but look at the bottom of your laptop to see if there are any intake holes, if there are, and plenty, then the cooler will help. If you have one of those laptops where the intake is at the hinge or on the sides, then I'm afraid it won't help much.

HOWEVER, the temperatures you are getting is inline with what Intel specified. Modern CPUs will throttle (provided that a heatsink is attached, so the rate of temperature rise isn't very quick) to protect themselves, should the worst case scenario occur. You shouldn't have to worry about the lifespan of the CPU, at all. At higher temperatures, your fan on the heatsink will likely fail due to bearing oil evaporation though. Again, if the fan intakes are on the bottom, then the laptop cooler might help.
September 13, 2012 1:00:46 PM

here in italy summer is ending and this mornig and now (3.00 pm) it's cool because it rained and the cpu is running at 100% without going past 60 degrees.
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September 13, 2012 2:00:46 PM

strelokstk said:
here in italy summer is ending and this mornig and now (3.00 pm) it's cool because it rained and the cpu is running at 100% without going past 60 degrees.


That's good. I lived in Italy for a summer, it was hot in July-September. I remember a few people had Sony laptops there, and they choked in the heat.
!